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Will you vaccinate with Conoravirus vaccine when one is available?

CityRail

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According to reports, coronavirus vaccine is entering its final phase of testing and very soon we will have millions of coronavirus vaccine to be rolled out, hopefully from September.

By then, should a coronavirus vaccine is available, will you vaccinate it?

Personally speaking, as a 30 year old young person, I will not vaccinate myself with Coronavirus, because:

1. It is just a small flu for young people, we won't die;
2. The vaccine is rushed and I cannot guarantee if I vaccinate myself, I will be immune to Coronavirus and not get killed by the vaccine;
3. The coronavirus vaccine is just a step to reopen our borders so that we can travel overseas again.

I am not anti-vaxier, however I only think that Coronavirus vaccine is just a political ticket for politicians to explain to the public that they can now open the international borders again and ease off travel bubbles.

What do you think?
 

drron

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drron

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Another problem with vaccine trials.Quite often the people in Phase 111 trials are younger.Have too many older participants means an increased risk of a medical event so increasing the chance the trial might have to be put on hold.The problem with this is that older persons may not have the same response as a younger person.Here is an example with a flu vaccine.

So it was good to see one of the vaccine candidates at least doing a small trial with older people.
 

drron

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And now all you need to know about Covid 19 immunity with information on some of the vaccines.Interesting is that China has immunised many thousands of people already before their phase 111 trials have concluded.

"Sinopharm researchers revealed that they had already begun to administer the vaccine to health-care personnel and groups at high risk of becoming infected.

The second vaccine candidate being tested by Sinopharm was developed by the Beijing Institute of Biological Products. A phase 3 trial (n=5000) is taking place in the United Arab Emirates (table). The United Arab Emirates has granted emergency use of the vaccine in health-care providers. Sinopharm have reportedly administered these experimental vaccines to hundreds of thousands of people under an emergency use condition approved by the Chinese Government."

 

JohnK

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No. Everything moving too quickly and too many moving parts.

But on the other hand how can I safely return to Thailand?
 

jakeseven7

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One of our business units works with people who are obese, overweight and pre-diabetic/diabetic. Knowing they are at high risk when we did a poll about vaccine and 9/10 would take.

This is a very high risk group though.
 

Oneworldplus2

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This will turn into the Anti-Vaxxers wet dream when the vaccine comes out...

Dr Ron - what is your take on the Moderna/CureVac RNA vaccine?
 
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drron

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Well they are new technology and RNA vaccines have not been aurhorised yet.Moderna has developed 4 such vaccines over the last 4 years and they are yet to be authorised for use.
As well these vaccines have to be kept at -70C which is a little difficult.
So they really do need to be investigated thoroughly by the regulators.
 

drron

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So some more papers on immunity after infection.




A little dry but a video on the latest on vaccines,time scales and the ways vaccines will be approved.
 

Oneworldplus2

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As well these vaccines have to be kept at -70C which is a little difficult.

Yep, that's very interesting.

Some more information popped up on ABC about that:


For the Moderna vaccine, the temperature must stay around -20C. For Pfizer's, it's more like -70C.
Once thawed, Moderna's vaccine can then last for 14 days at normal fridge temperatures. For Pfizer's, it is five days.
Pfizer says it has developed its own thermal shipping boxes that can hold up to 5,000 doses for up to 10 days, company senior director Brian Gleeson told a meeting at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
But it says the containers should not be opened more than twice a day or for more than one minute at a time — which, experts say, is not enough time to sort through 5,000 doses.
The boxes need dry ice to keep cold — approximately 23 kilograms to be replenished within 24 hours after the box is first opened, and then five days after.
This presents major challenges for rural and developing areas.
 

drron

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Not an article for the optimists.

"Peter Hotez, dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, said, “Ideally, you want an antiviral vaccine to do two things . . . first, reduce the likelihood you will get severely ill and go to the hospital, and two, prevent infection and therefore interrupt disease transmission.”7

Yet the current phase III trials are not actually set up to prove either (table 1). None of the trials currently under way are designed to detect a reduction in any serious outcome such as hospital admissions, use of intensive care, or deaths. Nor are the vaccines being studied to determine whether they can interrupt transmission of the virus."


"Number two, Zaks pointed to influenza vaccines, saying they protect against severe disease better than mild disease. To Moderna, it’s the same for covid-19: if its vaccine is shown to reduce symptomatic covid-19, it will be confident it also protects against serious outcomes.

But the truth is that the science remains far from clear cut, even for influenza vaccines that have been used for decades. Although randomised trials have shown an effect in reducing the risk of symptomatic influenza, such trials have never been conducted in elderly people living in the community to see whether they save lives.

Only two placebo controlled trials in this population have ever been conducted, and neither was designed to detect any difference in hospital admissions or deaths.23 Moreover, dramatic increases in use of influenza vaccines has not been associated with a decline in mortality (box 2).26"

 

drron

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Some good news for the Astra/Oxford vaccine with good antibody response in older participants.

But the UK government possibly hedging it's bets.

Some US States taking a more cautious approach.
 

drron

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It amazes me to see countries who have had a major problem with Covid cases where the people have doubts about a vaccine.
1604135651407.png .
 

JohnM

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It amazes me to see countries who have had a major problem with Covid cases where the people have doubts about a vaccine.
View attachment 232116 .

There must be some bizarre underlying social correlate there...

But, to me, Russia is the most weird. Does that represent an over-rejection of an authoritarian society after the populace has escaped its clutches?
 

OZDUCK

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There must be some bizarre underlying social correlate there...

But, to me, Russia is the most weird. Does that represent an over-rejection of an authoritarian society after the populace has escaped its clutches?

I was thinking more along the lines that Putin is trying to force an untested vaccine on them so they have lost confidence in vaccines.
 

drron

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Some more on vaccine developement and why the trials don't really test for whether it will actually protect you from severe disease.

 

OZDUCK

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Presumably a silly question but here goes anyway anyway. Would it be effective and/or safe to vaccinate with several vaccines either in the same injection or at different times in the hopes of getting an improved immune response.? I am thinking about the way the latest flue vaccine is 'quadrivalent' could something similar be usefully done with the Covid-19 vaccines?
 

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