Vaccine Rollout in Australia - personal accounts.

Matt_01

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To each their own, I suppose, but frankly I try and avoid listening to medical professionals and experts on important matters like this. Frankly, we don't have enough data as it is to say what course of vaccinations provides the best long term and short term protection (although we do know that these vaccines are safe). This is why I've taken the course of mixing AstraZeneca, Pfizer, Moderna (and hopefully Novavax when the commonwealth comes to their senses). We also don't know what the long term effects of a novel Coronavirus like this are. I'd rather get as much protection as I can, particularly now that travel has reopened and we have the highly infectious Omicron.

The only thing we can say for certain regardless of variant is you can't catch COVID outdoors, but that's about it.

-RooFlyer88
I actually listen to medical professionals and experts on important matters like this, MrsM works in this field, I do not.
 

drron

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Based on that I am supposing that I should have Novavax as my 2nd booster. I currently have had 3 X AZ as I have been advised against having mRNA vaccines.
Well officially AZ and Novavax haven't been approved for general use as a booster but can be used if an mRNA vaccine is contra indicated or if a person refuses to have an mRNA vaccine.
 
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If you have had 2 or 3 doses of an mRNA vaccine your fourth shot really should be Novavax. It could have been AZ but not approved as a booster which is sad...

So I had 2 AZ then a Moderna booster. I will have a 4th shot and it will be Novavax. However I will wait ~ 6 months from my third shot to have it. The main reason is we have a trip to Europe including a cruise in August and having the 4th shot about 6 weeks out from that makes sense to me.
Thanks, drron. I'm hoping I'll be able to get a 2nd booster before my trip to Alaska in July, but I wasn't sure of the best timing. Now I know.
 

Black Duck

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Well officially AZ and Novavax haven't been approved for general use as a booster but can be used if an mRNA vaccine is contra indicated or if a person refuses to have an mRNA vaccine.
I read that Novavax is only available if others are medically unsuitable. I was hoping it is approved an available to all by the time I am due for boosting but maybe just refusing anything else might work.
 
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For a really good 'fourth shot', what about we hear it for a little dose of good 'ol BA.2 - or XE if you're adventurous...

😜
The whole point of getting the vaccines is not to get COVID in the first place. That combined with a bunch of other things should greatly reduce my risk of catching COVID. We also don't know if a fourth heterogamous shot means for immunity. For all we know this could result in life long immunity from catching it (there hasn't been a study that I'm aware of that has looked at this). In any event, should I end up testing positive for it, the first thing I'm doing is heading straight for the COVID meds (the real stuff not the horse medicine I hear the influencers talk about).

I read that Novavax is only available if others are medically unsuitable. I was hoping it is approved an available to all by the time I am due for boosting but maybe just refusing anything else might work.
The real irony about Novavax, is it's only being administered to Novax and other vaccine skeptics. Those of us who want diversity in vaccine technology are being refused it all because we had AZ and/or Pfizer/Moderna prior. Makes no sense!

-RooFlyer88
 

Must...Fly!

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Pfizer, Pfizer, Moderna, don't think I'll be getting a 4th to be honest.

I'm 40, no underlying health issues, had Covid-19 back in Feb.

I'm not anti Vax, but getting a mRNA jab every 6 months doesn't sound right to me.
Completely agree with you.

Had 3rd jab in February.

Will see how the land lies, next time I go on a long overseas trip I *might* have a top up before I go, if I haven't contracted COVID in the interim.
 

drron

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The whole point of getting the vaccines is not to get COVID in the first place. That combined with a bunch of other things should greatly reduce my risk of catching COVID. We also don't know if a fourth heterogamous shot means for immunity. For all we know this could result in life long immunity from catching it (there hasn't been a study that I'm aware of that has looked at this). In any event, should I end up testing positive for it, the first thing I'm doing is heading straight for the COVID meds (the real stuff not the horse medicine I hear the influencers talk about).


The real irony about Novavax, is it's only being administered to Novax and other vaccine skeptics. Those of us who want diversity in vaccine technology are being refused it all because we had AZ and/or Pfizer/Moderna prior. Makes no sense!

-RooFlyer88
Except the story has changed since Omicron. it is not to stop infection now as the results are very borderline on that. The official line now is that the vaccine is to stop hospitalisations,serious infection and death.
Though there are now more studies showing that previous infection plus 1 dose of vaccine is more likely to stop infections than 3 doses of vaccine but no infection. That is what @JohnM is alluding to. I have previously posted one trial saying that in the General vaccine thread.
 

SYD

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Except the story has changed since Omicron. it is not to stop infection now as the results are very borderline on that. The official line now is that the vaccine is to stop hospitalisations,serious infection and death.
Though there are now more studies showing that previous infection plus 1 dose of vaccine is more likely to stop infections than 3 doses of vaccine but no infection. That is what @JohnM is alluding to. I have previously posted one trial saying that in the General vaccine thread.
I suspect that’s why myself and SYD+1 sailed through a week of London (packed Tube, restaurants, pubs, theatre etc) during a surge in cases but otherwise fine. Now touring the southwest, but even here places have closed because staff have gone down.

We are both AZ+AZ+Omicron (@Xmas)+PZ. Maybe even a BA2 booster now…!
 
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Except the story has changed since Omicron. it is not to stop infection now as the results are very borderline on that. The official line now is that the vaccine is to stop hospitalisations,serious infection and death.
Though there are now more studies showing that previous infection plus 1 dose of vaccine is more likely to stop infections than 3 doses of vaccine but no infection. That is what @JohnM is alluding to. I have previously posted one trial saying that in the General vaccine thread.
Has there been a single study that has shown that getting Omicron provides better protection than another heterogamous dose? I've known people who got COVID several times. If anything, it seems like COVID may predispose you to picking up the infection further down the road. I would be curious to see what proportion of people who had COVID had it more than once. I reckon it's not an insignificant number!

-RooFlyer88
 

drron

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Has there been a single study that has shown that getting Omicron provides better protection than another heterogamous dose? I've known people who got COVID several times. If anything, it seems like COVID may predispose you to picking up the infection further down the road. I would be curious to see what proportion of people who had COVID had it more than once. I reckon it's not an insignificant number!

-RooFlyer88
The problem with Omicron particularly BA 2 is that it is more infective as it evades the immune response. So both natural and vaccine efficacy will be less than with previous variants. Theoretically it should be better having natural immunity as that would stimulate IGg antibodies which prevent the virus infecting mucosal cells plus cellular immunity which is much less likely with vaccine immunity.

Here is one of the longest observational studies of breakthrough infections.
The incidence rate ratio (IRR) comparing natural immunity to vaccine immunity was 0.60 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.12,1.83; P = 0.55) and the IRR comparing the combination of vaccine immunity and natural immunity to vaccine immunity was 0.25 (95% CI 0.01,1.43; P = 0.19). In sensitivity analyses restricting to patients aged above 50 years and above 65 years, results were consistent with the main analysis indicating the highest incidence rate in the vaccine immunity group and lowest incidence for the combination of vaccine immunity and natural immunity.
Most of the patients with natural and vaccine immunity (57%) and vaccine immunity only (63%) received the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, followed by the Moderna vaccine (36% and 32%, respectively). During a follow-up time of 21 calendar months, out of 106,349 primary care patients (mean age, 52.3 years; 56.6% were female), there were 69 breakthrough COVID-19 hospitalisations. Of these, 65 (0.06%) occurred among 102,613 patients with vaccine immunity, 3 (0.03%) occurred among 11,047 patients with natural immunity, while the remaining 1 (0.01%) patient was among 7,313 patients with both natural and vaccine immunity.

Now the results did not reach significance but there is an obvious trend. Compared to those who had just vaccine immunity those with natural immunity had half the risk of a breakthrough inection whilst those with vaccine plus natural immunity had 1/6th the chance.
 

Pushka

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Comparison of the three types.
AZ - vax 1 - painless and no pain at site. Maybe coincidence but three days later I felt general aches but was fixed with one dose of Panadol
AZ - Vax 1 - nothing to report
Pfizer 1 - mild pain at injection site for two days but nothing more
Moderna - arm started aching about three hours after vaxxination and today can't really lift it above shoulder height.

If of any relevance I've been on hydroxychloroquine for a few years with auto immune stuff.
 
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On Tuesday I received my fourth dose of COVID vaccine, having previously received two AstraZeneca vaccines as the "prime" dose, and Pfizer as my dose 3. I felt fine on Tuesday and was actually up really late that day (i.e. 3 AM). However, when I woke up on Wednesday I wasn't feeling so grand: fever, headache, chills. As before, I decided not to take Tylenol or any pain relief and just push through with it, since I've read somewhere that allowing your body to go through with the normal immune response is best. Woke up today and felt about 90% back to where I was on Tuesday.

-RooFlyer88
 

VPS

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On Tuesday I received my fourth dose of COVID vaccine, having previously received two AstraZeneca vaccines as the "prime" dose, and Pfizer as my dose 3. I felt fine on Tuesday and was actually up really late that day (i.e. 3 AM). However, when I woke up on Wednesday I wasn't feeling so grand: fever, headache, chills. As before, I decided not to take Tylenol or any pain relief and just push through with it, since I've read somewhere that allowing your body to go through with the normal immune response is best. Woke up today and felt about 90% back to where I was on Tuesday.

-RooFlyer88
what did you have this time?
 
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