Vaccine Rollout in Australia - personal accounts.

33kft

Established Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2018
Posts
1,399
Got my first AZ today at Jeff's shed on the (second?) day of eligibility and can say it is a well oiled operation and everyone I encountered was in good spirits. 2 weeks from now I'll get the flu shot and then I guess it will be another few weeks for the follow up shot. Apart from likely feeling like a bit of a pin cushion by then it does feel good to have it ticked off the list and pretty much everyone I know in VIC is either done or booked for their first now that 18-39 are good to go.
 

mviy

Established Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2015
Posts
4,872
Got my first AZ today at Jeff's shed on the (second?) day of eligibility and can say it is a well oiled operation and everyone I encountered was in good spirits. 2 weeks from now I'll get the flu shot and then I guess it will be another few weeks for the follow up shot. Apart from likely feeling like a bit of a pin cushion by then it does feel good to have it ticked off the list and pretty much everyone I know in VIC is either done or booked for their first now that 18-39 are good to go.
18-39 have been good to get vaccinated at a GP since early July (or was it end of June?) after a GP consult in VIC. State vax hubs are much more recent.

So you're planning on having your second AZ after about 4 weeks?

At this stage I'm still planning on waiting the full 12 weeks. The current lockdown gives me confidence that the government is still trying to eliminate risk and I can't see that strategy changing in the next few months.

With the current restrictions I may hardly leave my home except to put out the rubbish.
 

jakeseven7

Enthusiast
Joined
Sep 9, 2005
Posts
10,185
18-39 have been good to get vaccinated at a GP since early July (or was it end of June?) after a GP consult in VIC. State vax hubs are much more recent.

Yes, but keep in mind - not all GP clinics to start with, the supply was disastrously low to most clinics for weeks and weeks, the supply was unpredictable to most clinics, the messaging from ATAGI v the government v the state based DoH was quite simply a clusterF which made it incredibly confusing to GPs, the indemnity (still is) a mess and defence insurers are still working through it.

I am virtually AMAZED the GPs have soldiered through this disaster of a rollout to them to deliver any vaccines at all and it’s an incredible testament to our primary health care system in this country that they have done the heavy lifting for us despite this absolute mess!
 

33kft

Established Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2018
Posts
1,399
18-39 have been good to get vaccinated at a GP since early July (or was it end of June?) after a GP consult in VIC. State vax hubs are much more recent.

So you're planning on having your second AZ after about 4 weeks?
In my mind I had pinned the start of eligibility to when I could log on to the vaccine registration form and book myself in but you are quite right about the previous pathway for 18-39. Being able to book directly is a game changer for this age group, I'd say many are like me - wouldn't know who "speak to your GP" actually refers to - I must have 3 or 4 GPs at this point depending on where I am and how I plan to get there. None of them would know me from a bar of soap...

I discussed the follow up jab timing with the nurse at the vax centre and they told me to check if the advice differs for me, as I have both a pregnant partner (hence the tight COVID and flu regimen for both of us) and some other special circumstance that might lead to a shorter interval recommendation, so I will have to do a GP visit and discuss timing to see if they recommend a shorter gap in my case.

The document that they had me read by scanning a QR code has 12 weeks as the optimal (not just maximum) second dose interval but the nurse initially said around 8 weeks but no longer than 12 to me, and then corrected that to "ask your GP" so I am not entirely sure what the advice is in general right now.

So in the end I did end up having to do what I tried to avoid and "ask my GP" but I'll be asking the wife's GP who absolutely does know who we are so that clears things up nicely.
 

mviy

Established Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2015
Posts
4,872
It can be any GP.

My GP knows how to contact me so if he wants me to have the second dose sooner than the 12 weeks I'm sure he'll be in touch.
 

TheRealTMA

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2012
Posts
7,528
Qantas
Platinum
It can be any GP.

My GP knows how to contact me so if he wants me to have the second dose sooner than the 12 weeks I'm sure he'll be in touch.
In our experiences, the GP where you had the first dose contacts patients about 2-5 days before the second dose is due, currently (QLD) 12 weeks.
 

mviy

Established Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2015
Posts
4,872
By any GP I meant you can go to any GP to get informed consent before the first dose.
 

33kft

Established Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2018
Posts
1,399
By any GP I meant you can go to any GP to get informed consent before the first dose.
I get that, but my point was what's the point, if they are just going to ask the same questions I get asked at the mass vac centre? They don't have anything on hand other than the 1 or 2 times I dropped in prior for miscellaneous complaints, so I'm glad you can just go and get vaxed directly now. Unfortunately mine and many others lifestyles aren't really conducive to bouncing around to get it done, hence why I waited until I could book straight in at a time that suited me. Plus it is lockdown right now in VIC so I would find the idea of any return visit to be totally unnecessary if it could be avoided.

In almost every GP visit I've had, you need to book separately for any shots as it's usually administered by a dedicated nurse and I guess the consult fees are pretty enticing, so I had zero faith I'd have been vaxed there and then, but perhaps I would have been proven wrong.

That said, the mass vac centre does exactly what it says on the tin with no return visits, no worrying about bulk billing or even having to pay for parking, hence why I think it is such a good experience and highly recommend it.
 
Sponsored Post

This is an example of a Sponsored Post, one of the many ways you can advertise on the Australian Frequent Flyer.

Other options include banner advertisements on our content and forum pages or our newsletter. You can also purchase an audio message on our podcast - or if you just want to try it out, you can sponsor a thread.

If you'd prefer not to see any advertisements (including these sponsored posts), you can become an AFF Supporter from just $6 and instantly remove all advertisements from our website!

mviy

Established Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2015
Posts
4,872
When I went to the GP they booked me in to have it done by the nurse the following Monday, which was still weeks ahead of when I could have had my first jab at a state hub.

The local GP is at a distance that I could walk to if I needed to, no need for a lift or public transport, so it will be very convenient for my second dose as well.

It's good there's a range of different options to suit different needs.
 

serfty

Veteran Member
Moderator
Joined
Nov 16, 2004
Posts
44,703
Qantas
Platinum
Virgin
Platinum
I had my first AZ at Jeff's Shed and 12 weeks later my second at a local GP's. it is now 14 seeks since my first Jab.

Today I received from "COVAXVIC" both by Email and SMS reminders to get my second jab.:)

Note at bottom of messages was:

"If you have already booked or received your second dose or have been advised by a healthcare professional to not receive your second dose, please disregard this message."
 

CaptainCurtis

Active Member
Joined
Oct 8, 2013
Posts
514
Thought I'd share my experience here...

I had my first Pfizer jab on August 4th as a mid-20's male living with someone who is deemed at risk. The actual vaccine went incredibly smoothly at the Olympic Park hub. Took about 2.5 hours from arrival to departure, including a 2-hour delay.. a small price to pay for the privilege of a vaccination (no sarcasm intended). Once my line started to move, the efficiency of the system and staff was truly impressive.

My only short-term side effects were a sore arm for a couple of days after. This eased up, and I was on my way... or so I thought.

On about the 12th of August (so a little over a week later), I began to experience a mild discomfort in my chest and random episodes of shortness of breath. To be frank, I really didn't think much of it. Back in mid-July I was sick some sort of virus (not COVID), and a mild cough has lingered since then. On Sunday, I went for a 90-minute walk (given there is not much else to do in Sydney at the moment), and feel absolutely fine. In the afternoon, I decided to wash my car and was absolutely wrecked afterwards. I am fairly fit, so walking generally doesn't raise my heart rate too much, but the car washing must have done the trick. The chest discomfort sporadically continued into Monday. On Monday evening, I was experiencing what felt like a fairly erratic heartbeat.

I called the doctor first thing on Tuesday morning and explained my symptoms. Sent off with a referral for an ECG and some bloods. Results came back this morning, with the ECG suggestive of pericarditis. Interestingly, my GP has referred me for an echo tomorrow morning. My GP did not sound overly concerned, and her preference was clearly to keep me away from the ED unless my symptoms deteroriate. With that said, pre-COVID, these are symptoms I definitely would have attended the ED for, so that does leave me feeling somewhat concerned.

Why am I sharing this? I'm not sure to be honest. My intention is certainly not to instil any fear; in fact, even if I knew with 100% certainty that I would experience these side effects I would still have had my jab. And I still intend, GP-willing, to have my second jab early next month. With that said, it does feel 'weird' to have experienced side effects where there are such slim chances of occurence. Perhaps that is a result of the media and their incessant focus on the risks of vaccines.
 

CaptainCurtis

Active Member
Joined
Oct 8, 2013
Posts
514
That history is classical of a Pfizer vaccine reaction. Pericarditis is self limiting but you should have a serum troponin done. If it is myocarditis it is also usually self limiting but you should be monitored to exclude a cardiac arrhythmia.
I was originally under the (misguided) impression it was more common for symptoms to emerge within a couple of days, rather than a full week later, but I'm hearing a number of instances of it being more common than otherwise thought.

Thankfully my bloods, including troponin, all came back perfectly :)
 

jakeseven7

Enthusiast
Joined
Sep 9, 2005
Posts
10,185
Thought I'd share my experience here...

I had my first Pfizer jab on August 4th as a mid-20's male living with someone who is deemed at risk. The actual vaccine went incredibly smoothly at the Olympic Park hub. Took about 2.5 hours from arrival to departure, including a 2-hour delay.. a small price to pay for the privilege of a vaccination (no sarcasm intended). Once my line started to move, the efficiency of the system and staff was truly impressive.

My only short-term side effects were a sore arm for a couple of days after. This eased up, and I was on my way... or so I thought.

On about the 12th of August (so a little over a week later), I began to experience a mild discomfort in my chest and random episodes of shortness of breath. To be frank, I really didn't think much of it. Back in mid-July I was sick some sort of virus (not COVID), and a mild cough has lingered since then. On Sunday, I went for a 90-minute walk (given there is not much else to do in Sydney at the moment), and feel absolutely fine. In the afternoon, I decided to wash my car and was absolutely wrecked afterwards. I am fairly fit, so walking generally doesn't raise my heart rate too much, but the car washing must have done the trick. The chest discomfort sporadically continued into Monday. On Monday evening, I was experiencing what felt like a fairly erratic heartbeat.

I called the doctor first thing on Tuesday morning and explained my symptoms. Sent off with a referral for an ECG and some bloods. Results came back this morning, with the ECG suggestive of pericarditis. Interestingly, my GP has referred me for an echo tomorrow morning. My GP did not sound overly concerned, and her preference was clearly to keep me away from the ED unless my symptoms deteroriate. With that said, pre-COVID, these are symptoms I definitely would have attended the ED for, so that does leave me feeling somewhat concerned.

Why am I sharing this? I'm not sure to be honest. My intention is certainly not to instil any fear; in fact, even if I knew with 100% certainty that I would experience these side effects I would still have had my jab. And I still intend, GP-willing, to have my second jab early next month. With that said, it does feel 'weird' to have experienced side effects where there are such slim chances of occurence. Perhaps that is a result of the media and their incessant focus on the risks of vaccines.

Thanks for sharing. Nothing in life is risk free including any of the vaccines on offer. Now as long as you don’t go on Sky Nightly Hysterical News gasping in fear and threatening law suits that would be much appreciated ;)

And good bloody on you for getting jabbed and already getting ready for your second jab already (medical advice pending as you say).
 

drron

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2002
Posts
30,172
Myocarditis/pericarditis side effect of the mRNA vaccines are usually after the second dose but can be after the first.No evidence that it will occur again at this stage though the numbers naturally aren't high.
 

CaptainCurtis

Active Member
Joined
Oct 8, 2013
Posts
514
Myocarditis/pericarditis side effect of the mRNA vaccines are usually after the second dose but can be after the first.No evidence that it will occur again at this stage though the numbers naturally aren't high.
That's interesting, thank you for sharing. I'm assuming the 'dr' in 'drron' is not just part of a pseudonym in asking this, but pre-COVID (i.e. without the concern of catching the disease while in hospital) would the recommendation be for someone with similar symptoms to present to the ED?

There are some really interesting psychological elements at play for those going through illness during COVID (not just pertaining to side effects from vaccinations). I've always grown up in an environment (perhaps due to watching grandparents deterioriate over a prolonged period of time) where chest pain = an immediate visit to the ED. Yet, my GP pushed staying at home fairly strongly (unless symptoms deteriorated).

The (frustrating) outcome is the added anxiety while waiting for results and appointments for each of the tests. ECG/bloods were yesterday morning, results this morning, echo tomorrow, with results most likely Friday morning. While I'm not trying to come across as unhappy with the time (3.5 days all up), something internally tells me it would have been both easier and less stressful to simply show-up to the ED and have all the tests completed/returned within hours.
 
Top