Will you vaccinate with Conoravirus vaccine when one is available?

CityRail

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According to reports, coronavirus vaccine is entering its final phase of testing and very soon we will have millions of coronavirus vaccine to be rolled out, hopefully from September.

By then, should a coronavirus vaccine is available, will you vaccinate it?

Personally speaking, as a 30 year old young person, I will not vaccinate myself with Coronavirus, because:

1. It is just a small flu for young people, we won't die;
2. The vaccine is rushed and I cannot guarantee if I vaccinate myself, I will be immune to Coronavirus and not get killed by the vaccine;
3. The coronavirus vaccine is just a step to reopen our borders so that we can travel overseas again.

I am not anti-vaxier, however I only think that Coronavirus vaccine is just a political ticket for politicians to explain to the public that they can now open the international borders again and ease off travel bubbles.

What do you think?
 

Ric

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Did I read it right that from May 3 that those in 1b with underlying diseases can get Pfizer in Vaccine hubs and Respiratory clinics?
 

Ric

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But they also say this >
National cabinet agreed to expand state vaccination hubs and open them to all Australians eligible for a vaccine. Aged and disability care workers, critical workers, healthcare staff and others in phases 1a and 1b will now be able to receive Pfizer vaccines through state clinics as well as Commonwealth respiratory clinics.
No mention of under 50. But did so in another later paragraph!
 

yohy?!

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According to reports, coronavirus vaccine is entering its final phase of testing and very soon we will have millions of coronavirus vaccine to be rolled out, hopefully from September.

By then, should a coronavirus vaccine is available, will you vaccinate it?

Personally speaking, as a 30 year old young person, I will not vaccinate myself with Coronavirus, because:

1. It is just a small flu for young people, we won't die;
2. The vaccine is rushed and I cannot guarantee if I vaccinate myself, I will be immune to Coronavirus and not get killed by the vaccine;
3. The coronavirus vaccine is just a step to reopen our borders so that we can travel overseas again.

I am not anti-vaxier, however I only think that Coronavirus vaccine is just a political ticket for politicians to explain to the public that they can now open the international borders again and ease off travel bubbles.

What do you think?
you may want to consider your potential as an asymptomatic virus host carrier, this would be much less likely if you are vaccinated.

the risk of death by any of the approved vaccines is no greater than any other vaccine you have already taken - death in a car accident is far more likely.
 

johnnyk

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you may want to consider your potential as an asymptomatic virus host carrier, this would be much less likely if you are vaccinated.

the risk of death by any of the approved vaccines is no greater than any other vaccine you have already taken - death in a car accident is far more likely.
Only time will tell. Better to wait then to rush in and regret it, by then it will be to late, remember 99% recover.
 

Chicken

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remember 99% recover.

This is factually incorrect, and needs to be called out, because this comment puts lives at risk.

Cancer does not cause the collapse of hospitals in Italy / US / UK / Brazil / India / etc.
Flu does not cause the collapse of hospitals in Italy / US / UK / Brazil / India / etc.
Gastro does not cause the collapse of hospitals in Italy / US / UK / Brazil / India / etc.

COVID-19 does.

On top of the death rate, people who recover from COVID-19 suffer from life changing symptoms.

"Long Covid: snapshot poll finds more than 1m people with symptoms in UK" (Guardian 02 April 2021)

"Onions, coffee, meat, fruit, alcohol, toothpaste, cleaning products and perfume all make her want to vomit. Tap water has the same effect (though not filtered water), which makes washing difficult." (BBC 28 January 2021).

Do you want to vomit everytime when you turn on the water tap? Is this the quality of life you want? Think about this.
 

Must...Fly!

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Let's not go too far one way or other other.

COVID needs to be controlled by vaccines and lockdowns where hospitals are overwhelmed.

We have the former rolling out now, the latter never happened in Australia. Lockdowns due to COVID-19 should very soon be a thing of the past.
 

HappyFlyerFamily

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Let's not go too far one way or other other.

COVID needs to be controlled by vaccines and lockdowns where hospitals are overwhelmed.

We have the former rolling out now, the latter never happened in Australia. Lockdowns due to COVID-19 should very soon be a thing of the past.
But it’s been said that WA (public?) hospitals are already at capacity. Not sure about other States and Territories.
 

Must...Fly!

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But it’s been said that WA (public?) hospitals are already at capacity. Not sure about other States and Territories.
Yes. The system is run at or above capacity. Resource efficient on one hand, leaves no space for slack on the other. WA is not the only state with that problem but it has been consistent and persistent throughout COVID with almost no flu season. The system and public health service needs serious short and long term investment, however the government seems content running $2bn plus surpluses as a political tool.
 

JohnM

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Yes. The system is run at or above capacity. Resource efficient on one hand, leaves no space for slack on the other. WA is not the only state with that problem but it has been consistent and persistent throughout COVID with almost no flu season. The system and public health service needs serious short and long term investment, however the government seems content running $2bn plus surpluses as a political tool.

It might also be relevant to consider that the population growth in WA over the last few years has run way, way ahead of the requisite infrastructure (both physical and staffing - and that's not only confined to hospitals) and the long lead times to provide such infrastructure.

You can have billions in surplus, but if the building industry is saturated, as it is, and we're increasingly reliant on immigrant medical staff, as we are, no amount of dosh is going to turn that around overnight.
 

Must...Fly!

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You can have billions in surplus, but if the building industry is saturated, as it is, and we're increasingly reliant on immigrant medical staff, as we are, no amount of dosh is going to turn that around overnight.
No but this is not a new phenomenon and I don't really accept "the building industry is saturated" as an excuse. If a new hospital is required then it is required and the government has to tender and pay the going rate. Just like private industry does.

But that may not even be the biggest problem.

I have been told one major Perth public hospital is running approximately 50 primary medical staff short of required establishment numbers. Resignations continue to come through every month from staff who are sick of being worked to the bone with little to no action from management to fix problems.
 

drron

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Both WA and TAS are running over capacity.Earlier this year when working in TAS every major hospital had no available beds for a fortnight.
 

Lynda2475

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If we are continually short of Doctors then government needs to increase hecs sponsored med school quotas at our universities. Each year heaps of students miss out on places then we end up having to import doctors.

Entry scores and quotas arent the issue for nursing staff, its poor wages. Something the governments could address at public hospitals.
 

Pushka

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If we are continually short of Doctors then government needs to increase hecs sponsored med school quotas at our universities. Each year heaps of students miss out on places then we end up having to import doctors.

Entry scores and quotas arent the issue for nursing staff, its poor wages. Something the governments could address at public hospitals.
Our issue in SA is nurses. Their training should be free. They are essential and I'd like for it to become a more attractive career path for men as well.
 

mviy

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If we are continually short of Doctors then government needs to increase hecs sponsored med school quotas at our universities. Each year heaps of students miss out on places then we end up having to import doctors.
Each additional place increases the average cost per student for medicine. There are lots of costs like getting them necessary training in hospitals etc. that become increasingly difficult to organise the more students there are.

Entry to the course doesn't necessarily mean they will pass. Also to make most efficient use of the limited places we need people to complete the course and then work full time for decades, but for a variety of reasons some end up working part time.

Some specialists will require over a decade of training to get properly qualified with ongoing training for the rest of their working life. So any increase in places wouldn't be a short term fix and won't negate the need to import doctors trained elsewhere.
 

Lynda2475

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I wasnt implying it is a short term fix, we need to be thinking long term, way too much short term thinking goes on. The population has been growing, placesneedto keep pace plus a few extra to account for those who dont complete.

In NSW Medicine has been a post grad course for well over a decade and applicants are also screened by interview. Its much harder to get into medicine degree now than it was in the 80s and 90s when it was an undergraduate degree.

We need to be investing in educational programs which produce graduates with skills we need. We have a over supply of law graduates, yet struggle to get doctors, nurses and teachers in regional areas. Time to offer extra conditional places with caveat of needing to work regional for x years post grad.

My bosses daughter a dual Aus and NZ citizen couldnt get a med school place here, so joined the NZDF who have paid for her degree and arranged necessary placements for her to now do her surgical residency.
 

drron

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If we are continually short of Doctors then government needs to increase hecs sponsored med school quotas at our universities. Each year heaps of students miss out on places then we end up having to import doctors.

Entry scores and quotas arent the issue for nursing staff, its poor wages. Something the governments could address at public hospitals.
~7-8 years ago the Government did increase the number of medical school places considerably.Last year the first of those graduated.The problem then was that there were not enough intern positions for training and to get fully registered.I know of one who went back to Canada to get a job - his family had been in Australia ~ 20 years but he had dual citizenship.
 

Big_fella1

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My answer was an emphatic yes until recent events, which now make me unsure.
I understand the problems of AstraZeneca weren't foreseeable, but we went almost all in on the cheapest solution. In January, my BMI was 41, and I would have been eligible under 1b, which would mean Pfizer. Now with a BMI of 35, I no longer qualify.
I turn 50 in September, and I guess I'll get AZ then, knowing there is an incredibly minute chance it will kill me, which is a bit discouraging.
All of this has encouraged me to apply for Serbian citizenship (descent) as they haven't scrimped on their vaccination program and allow a choice of vaccines (note if you choose Moderna, you'll be waiting until October at least.) But with at least a 5-month wait for citizenship processing and uncertainty, if getting a safe vaccine is a valid reason to leave Australia, that is looking a long shot.
Pennywise pound foolish has been a constant bugbear in my life, but maybe I'm wrong as most prominent businesses and the government operate this way.
 

PineappleSkip

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if getting a safe vaccine is a valid reason to leave Australia
No, it isn't, sorry. It isn't urgent medical treatment.

IIRC the choice of supplier was based on availability, ability to procure in a reasonable time, and ability to manufacture in Australia. The actual cost of the vaccines is a drop in the bucket of the total COVID response.

cheers skip
 
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