Will you vaccinate with Conoravirus vaccine when one is available?

CityRail

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According to reports, coronavirus vaccine is entering its final phase of testing and very soon we will have millions of coronavirus vaccine to be rolled out, hopefully from September.

By then, should a coronavirus vaccine is available, will you vaccinate it?

Personally speaking, as a 30 year old young person, I will not vaccinate myself with Coronavirus, because:

1. It is just a small flu for young people, we won't die;
2. The vaccine is rushed and I cannot guarantee if I vaccinate myself, I will be immune to Coronavirus and not get killed by the vaccine;
3. The coronavirus vaccine is just a step to reopen our borders so that we can travel overseas again.

I am not anti-vaxier, however I only think that Coronavirus vaccine is just a political ticket for politicians to explain to the public that they can now open the international borders again and ease off travel bubbles.

What do you think?
 

Pushka

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WHO have pretty much no credibility in my eyes, not sure how much they have worldwide either. They are complicit with the Chinese government as to how this virus spread so widely in the first place. I'd say their actions in trying to downplay it to avoid any criticism toward China was extremely immoral.

Regardless you could argue that giving vaccines to adults under 75 would be the better outcome as they are most likely to be spreading it.
I think they lost any cred with me when much of the world declared pandemic weeks before WHO and they got dragged to it kicking and screaming.
 

N860CR

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What I’m not fully understanding is why, when we’re looking at a practical rollout of vaccines to the vulnerable by mid-year, there is still debate about not “opening borders” this year. Based on that logic, why are we vaccinating at all? COVID has been as good as eliminated in all Australian jurisdictions and that seems to be the plan moving forward. So why do we need a vaccine? The only reason we need it is to open international borders, and if we don’t do that, how will we even know it works?
 

Lynda2475

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Well if only the old and vulberable are vaccinated, and they open the borders we will see cases in the young and given some states wont keep their borders open domestically if there is so much as one case in another state, cant see them accepting a risk of multiple cases everyday.

Think we will need to see mass vaccinations to herd immunity levels (80%) to get the international borders open without restrictions.

I think once every Aussie who wants a vaccine has the ability to get one (so that will be at least Sept - since best case scenario is 6 months for delivery) then borders can open to vaccinated visitors, it would be easier to get agreement I imagine if the vaccines were shown to stop transmission, not just disease.
 
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Must...Fly!

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All indications are the vaccines don't do that though. They lessen severity but not so much the case load.

The rest of the world will match on without is with that attitude. And I do most definitely have to ask, if borders opening aren't on the table then why are we vaccinating?

Current approach is unbelievably unsustainable. Where do we go from here??
 

N860CR

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Well if only the old and vulberable are vaccinated, and they open the borders we will see cases in the young and given some states wont keep their borders open domestically if there is so much as one case in another state, cant see them accepting a risk of multiple cases everyday.

Don’t disagree. I would like to think that once the program has started and we’ve got a little more data from overseas, the government will say “ok so once we hit 75% then we’re good to open”.

Otherwise, there will be a lot more apprehension about getting the vaccine. Really, if the border is closed and the risk of exposure is 0 (and for younger people, the risk of serious illness is negligible), I can see a lot of people going “I’m not taking a rushed vaccine that will serve no benefit to me”.

It would have been like forcing a yellow fever vaccination onto everyone in 2019. Who would really have taken it given the chance of contracting YF is close to 0?
 

Pushka

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I ’m not taking a rushed vaccine that will serve no benefit to me”.
That's a good point. If the vaccine will make no difference to freedoms and you are of an age where it doesn't present any significant risk to catch the disease, then why bother?
 

N860CR

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That's a good point. If the vaccine will make no difference to freedoms and you are of an age where it doesn't present any significant risk to catch the disease, then why bother?

I would like to hope that, come the end of European/US winter when I think we’ll see the benefits of the vaccine flowing through, the Australian government may be forced to set a date. That will coincide with when they’re going to start expecting the general public to line up for vaccination.
 

MEL_Traveller

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I would like to hope that, come the end of European/US winter when I think we’ll see the benefits of the vaccine flowing through, the Australian government may be forced to set a date. That will coincide with when they’re going to start expecting the general public to line up for vaccination.

The PM, Deputy PM and CHO all rolled back yesterday's comments by Professor Murphy. The CHO saying a vaccine is the key to opening borders. The PM and Deputy indicating 'later this year' for easing of restrictions, all things going well.
 

KitKat

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That's a good point. If the vaccine will make no difference to freedoms and you are of an age where it doesn't present any significant risk to catch the disease, then why bother?
It reduces the severity and/or being infected......... time will tell.
There will always be the vulnerable, unvaccinated etc and it is not 100% effective......nothing is
It will reduce deaths and/or severity
Will it open borders? I'm guessing no....... in the short term till we accept what is acceptable in terms of death and illness. I don't see the 14 day quarantine for returning to Oz going away (excluding bubbles...... but you can see how quickly a bubble will end with the domestic border situation when there's a spike in cases)
There may be some pragmatic home isolation and testing for returning travellers..... for low risk countries in the future
Main hope is that this blends in to the background "flu" virus season with reduced severity for us to get back to "normality" - vaccination may just help us get there sooner
 

N860CR

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It reduces the severity and/or being infected......... time will tell.
There will always be the vulnerable, unvaccinated etc and it is not 100% effective......nothing is
It will reduce deaths and/or severity
Will it open borders? I'm guessing no....... in the short term till we accept what is acceptable in terms of death and illness. I don't see the 14 day quarantine for returning to Oz going away (excluding bubbles...... but you can see how quickly a bubble will end with the domestic border situation when there's a spike in cases)
There may be some pragmatic home isolation and testing for returning travellers..... for low risk countries in the future
Main hope is that this blends in to the background "flu" virus season with reduced severity for us to get back to "normality" - vaccination may just help us get there sooner

But if there’s no COVID anywhere (as it stands now), the borders are closed so it’s not getting in, why bother getting a vaccine? Especially when we’re expecting the vaccine to be an annual inoculation. I can see people saying “let’s wait for the next round if I gain nothing from this one”.
 

KitKat

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But if there’s no COVID anywhere (as it stands now), the borders are closed so it’s not getting in, why bother getting a vaccine? Especially when we’re expecting the vaccine to be an annual inoculation. I can see people saying “let’s wait for the next round if I gain nothing from this one”.
It will likely get "in"...... there will likely be "leakage" from eg the quarantine hotels etc. It is never going to be 100% secure. The plans are to catch any "leakage" early/asap... before it spreads too far and wide.
The hope is this ends up being like the "swine" flu....... less severe, blends into seasonal flu and we then forget about it (like the "swine" flu!).
If we are mostly vaccinated, most will have a less severe illness if they do get it and less likely to overwhelm the health care system. So we may then move on with our "normality".
 

N860CR

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It will likely get "in"...... there will likely be "leakage" from eg the quarantine hotels etc. It is never going to be 100% secure. The plans are to catch any "leakage" early/asap... before it spreads too far and wide.

True, but those controls negate the need for a vaccine. Asking people to take a very quickly approved vaccine for the off chance the virus escapes quarantine. The risk of exposure
The hope is this ends up being like the "swine" flu....... less severe, blends into seasonal flu and we then forget about it (like the "swine" flu!).
If we are mostly vaccinated, most will have a less severe illness if they do get it and less likely to overwhelm the health care system. So we may then move on with our "normality".

Again, true. But the only way that concept works is if borders are opened and we allow the virus back in.

Not disagreeing at all and I’ll be the first lined up to stick the vaccine in me. But I do see it being a hard sell to people on the fence if there’s not a carrot of some description. The only thing that can be offered is intl borders opening.
 

MEL_Traveller

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It reduces the severity and/or being infected......... time will tell.
There will always be the vulnerable, unvaccinated etc and it is not 100% effective......nothing is
It will reduce deaths and/or severity
Will it open borders? I'm guessing no....... in the short term till we accept what is acceptable in terms of death and illness. I don't see the 14 day quarantine for returning to Oz going away (excluding bubbles...... but you can see how quickly a bubble will end with the domestic border situation when there's a spike in cases)
There may be some pragmatic home isolation and testing for returning travellers..... for low risk countries in the future
Main hope is that this blends in to the background "flu" virus season with reduced severity for us to get back to "normality" - vaccination may just help us get there sooner

Will it open borders? The CHO says it will. The Feds are mostly on message about this, with the exception of Professor Murphy.

you're right - there will always be the vulnerable, but we accept a level of risk with the flu. And similar to the flu, those who choose not to vaccinate are accepting the risk. At some point can argue we have done everything we can. Continuing with closed borders is not sustainable in the long term.
 

KitKat

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True, but those controls negate the need for a vaccine. Asking people to take a very quickly approved vaccine for the off chance the virus escapes quarantine. The risk of exposure


Again, true. But the only way that concept works is if borders are opened and we allow the virus back in.

Not disagreeing at all and I’ll be the first lined up to stick the vaccine in me. But I do see it being a hard sell to people on the fence if there’s not a carrot of some description. The only thing that can be offered is intl borders opening.
We are in a FF forum, our priorities are different from the population... maybe :)
International travel may not be high in terms of priorities in most, return to usual employment, less severe illness, less likely to die etc may be more important....
Don't get me wrong, I truly miss travelling and being cooped up in J for 14 hours 🤣
but the aim of all these lock downs/quarantines etc have been to reduce deaths/severity.
Vaccines offer that possibility with some easing of restrictions balancing acceptable deaths/illness. It really is what the government and/or society accepts in terms of deaths/severe illness that will determine what/when restrictions will be eased
We do agree :)
 

HappyFlyerFamily

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Will it open borders? The CHO says it will. The Feds are mostly on message about this, with the exception of Professor Murphy.

you're right - there will always be the vulnerable, but we accept a level of risk with the flu. And similar to the flu, those who choose not to vaccinate are accepting the risk. At some point can argue we have done everything we can. Continuing with closed borders is not sustainable in the long term.
If they say ‘a vaccine is the key’ to opening borders, they’d could just be meaning they are not in this instance relying on luck (eg hoping the emergence of a variant that is less severe, less transmissible) or better treatments. So a vaccine might be the key, time will tell if we have the right vaccine
 

lovetravellingoz

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The PM, Deputy PM and CHO all rolled back yesterday's comments by Professor Murphy. The CHO saying a vaccine is the key to opening borders.


I believe that it is the key. But I also tend to believe that for the key to work that you need massive worldwide vaccination and that this will take a lot of time to be achieved at high enough levels. I would be thinking more like 2022, than 2021 for any level of meaningful international travel to be allowed both in and out.

Israel should provide us with some good initial data on what may be possible (both in terms of protecting individual health, as well as if it can limit transmission) they look likely to be the first country to achieve significant vaccination rates.
 

Must...Fly!

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If the vaccine puts paid to insane travel restrictions within the country and also a workable, reliable travel bubble between AU & NZ then that is a good start.

I somewhat sympathise with the suggestions upthread about younger people asking "why bother". Certainly some of my friends have indicated they won't opt to receive the vaccine as they don't view COVID-19 as a threat to them and rightfully so (the evidence proves this).

I will happily have it, especially so if I can guarantee myself the Oxford-AZ vaccine and it contributes to what I mentioned above becoming a reality. For the record I am turning 30 soon.
 
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