Will you vaccinate with Conoravirus vaccine when one is available?

CityRail

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According to reports, coronavirus vaccine is entering its final phase of testing and very soon we will have millions of coronavirus vaccine to be rolled out, hopefully from September.

By then, should a coronavirus vaccine is available, will you vaccinate it?

Personally speaking, as a 30 year old young person, I will not vaccinate myself with Coronavirus, because:

1. It is just a small flu for young people, we won't die;
2. The vaccine is rushed and I cannot guarantee if I vaccinate myself, I will be immune to Coronavirus and not get killed by the vaccine;
3. The coronavirus vaccine is just a step to reopen our borders so that we can travel overseas again.

I am not anti-vaxier, however I only think that Coronavirus vaccine is just a political ticket for politicians to explain to the public that they can now open the international borders again and ease off travel bubbles.

What do you think?
 

MEL_Traveller

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The opposition will normally be briefed on matters such as security of State. Any other briefing would usually depend on the style of the government Minister. Given that it appears the opposition is trying to politically wedge the government on the timing of the vaccine rollout, it most probably would be seen as a partisan matter by the government.

Commercially we are dealing with sensitive patents, intellectual property, licenses, etc. The appropriate dangers would be dealt with the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA), who is responsible for assessing vaccines and other medicines before they can be used in Australia. The TGA will only register a vaccine for use in Australia if its benefits are much greater than its risks. That assessment would include the 'dangers'.

Fair enough. I guess it just came across as the PM attacking the person (calling them naive) rather than the argument. The 'you just don't understand' line doesn't work if you don't provide the information :(
 
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drron

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So. The emergency authorisation versus ‘standard’ authorisation. How can there be a difference? It either works or it doesn’t. If it harms people then it shouldn’t be used in an emergency either. Because then that becomes the villain not the virus. Seems very black and white to me.
Emergency authorisations do not necessarily lead to a full authorisation.As more evidence comes in then the emergency authorisation can be withdrawn.Classic example is hydroxychloroquine for treatment of Covid.
 

Pushka

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Emergency authorisations do not necessarily lead to a full authorisation.As more evidence comes in then the emergency authorisation can be withdrawn.Classic example is hydroxychloroquine for treatment of Covid.
But that doesn't really explain the question I asked, just the process involved.

Hydroxychloroquine became very politically charged. Also, how about other situations where emergency approval provided a short term response that eventually became the fully authorised response.
 

drron

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But that doesn't really explain the question I asked, just the process involved.

Hydroxychloroquine became very politically charged. Also, how about other situations where emergency approval provided a short term response that eventually became the fully authorised response.
They need more evidence for a full authorisation than for an emergency authorisation.more patients,more time.
As to HCQ it wasn't the politics that led to the pulling of the emergency authorisation but results of larger,better controlled trials that showed no substantial benefits.
However there is still provisional authorisation to continue trials of HCQ in the prevention of Covid pre exposure.The Australian trial has closed now for new recruits.No results at this time and it may be some time.As well as virtually no cases now in front line health workers it may not give a result.
 

OZDUCK

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Interesting report about the struggling UK vaccination effort. They appear to be allowing the vaccine shots to be 'mixed' without any testing whether the us of two different vaccines works or even possibly causes problems.

 
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RooFlyer

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Report in today’s Oz ( on my phone can’t quote) that there may be an issue with the ‘collision’ of the COVID vaccine with the regular flu vaccination. Uncertain how they may interact/ affect each other. Ie can you get one in one arm and the other in other arm at same visit?

March not a problem, but later in the year may be.
 

drron

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The EU gives Emergency authorisation for the Moderna vaccine.


And India gives Emergency authorisation for one of their own vaccines.
 

Melburnian1

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No you can’t, and won’t be able to for some time.

The Australian government is working under the assumption that departures might be freed up somewhat by around this time next year, and I see no prospect whatsoever of that being brought forward and every possibility of it being pushed out.

I wish journalists would push them a little harder to announce their intentions, but the first most people will hear of it is when QF starts cancelling their 2H 2021 flights.

Unwise to book any international flight yet, unless one wants to give an airline including QF an interest free, unsecured loan. If it decides to give the booker a refund, that might take four months or more after a cancellation is announced of the particular flight(s).

It's not just up to the Oz govt whether we can travel: it depends on whether other nations will let us in - some have already said yes - but do any of us know if those govts might behave like the majority of our Premiers and reimpose harsher inbound quarantine or other restrictions at a whim? And what arrangements apply when we return?
 

drron

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Actually there is one airline where it really is good to book reward flights-SQ.at the end of January last year I booked award flights on SQ to BKK with the SYD-SIN leg in F.That used up all of mrsdrron's points which were due to expire in Feb.
The flights were for Boxing Day.When SQ cancelled the flights I did ring and ask if her points would expire when they went back into her account and they said no.They didn't but I have booked similiar awards for August.She had 5000 points left over and now 4 months after the points went back into her account those points are still not listed as expiring in the next 6 months.
 

Must...Fly!

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Joe Biden has said the US will follow the lead of the UK and abandon the Trump administration's policy of adhering to manufacturer vaccine schedules. Flip side being that more will be vaccinated but obviously not as protected, or so we think.

 

Melburnian1

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hopefully that will become reality sooner rather than later to be honest

The history of political promises in Oz - not just Federally, but states - suggests this timeline won't be met.

Say that vaccination starts on 20 February: 40 days until 31 March.

An average of 100,000 would have to be vaccinated daily - so 33000 in NSW, 25000 in Vic and so on. Quite a few Australians have opted out of 'MyHealthRecord' so that may slow things down somewhat.

The aged (a major priority group) are disparate: a minority (10-15 per cent at most) are in aged care settings, but apparently most are in their own homes. Some aren't 'connected' in the way of savvy AFFers. ScoMo has said the vaccinations won't be compulsory though.

Does this timeline allow for the second shot for each participant? The Pfizer vaccine shots have to be spaced 21 days apart.
 

MEL_Traveller

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The history of political promises in Oz - not just Federally, but states - suggests this timeline won't be met.

Say that vaccination starts on 20 February: 40 days until 31 March.

An average of 100,000 would have to be vaccinated daily - so 33000 in NSW, 25000 in Vic and so on. Quite a few Australians have opted out of 'MyHealthRecord' so that may slow things down somewhat.

The aged (a major priority group) are disparate: a minority (10-15 per cent at most) are in aged care settings, but apparently most are in their own homes. Some aren't 'connected' in the way of savvy AFFers. ScoMo has said the vaccinations won't be compulsory though.

Does this timeline allow for the second shot for each participant? The Pfizer vaccine shots have to be spaced 21 days apart.

Apparently the timeline allows for second doses somewhere around the '50 year' band.

People may have opted out of MyHealthRecord, but plenty get a letter from Centrelink related to pensions or seniors cards :)
 

rogerkambah

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Apparently the timeline allows for second doses somewhere around the '50 year' band.

People may have opted out of MyHealthRecord, but plenty get a letter from Centrelink related to pensions or seniors cards :)
Probably better to use Medicare records as all citizens should have one. NZ and PRs are also eligible to access Medicare. Those older people who don't receive pensions or have senior's cards are then included.
Can then sort into age cohorts.
 

Must...Fly!

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On Tuesday, the Australasian Virology Society confirmed to The Age and The Sydney Morning Herald that it supported an immediate pause in plans to roll out the AstraZeneca vaccine until research proved it was effective enough to achieve herd immunity.

But following a furious internal debate, the president of the virology society contacted The Age and the Herald late on Tuesday evening to say it had changed its position and no longer opposed the rollout of the vaccine.

When asked why the society was changing its official position at the last moment, its president, Professor Gilda Tachedjian, said: "That’s for us to know and you to find out".

“One reason is we don’t want to undermine the confidence in the vaccine. And we don’t have the full picture. We need to go with the most effective vaccine so we can have herd immunity. But we just don’t have the full picture at the moment with the AstraZeneca vaccine."

Interesting back and forth within the expert circles.

I'm not sure if a lower effectiveness even matters? Sure if you want herd immunity it does, but in the real world without a 100% effective vaccine anywhere on the planet, a 100% effective vaccine in preventing severe illness seems like a pretty good middle ground when the shots are incredibly cheap and incredibly easy to transport, especially in contrast to the Pfizer and Moderna shots. And the possibility of an efficacy almost as high as these other expensive and super cold storage ones.
 

Pushka

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Interesting back and forth within the expert circles.

I'm not sure if a lower effectiveness even matters? Sure if you want herd immunity it does, but in the real world without a 100% effective vaccine anywhere on the planet, a 100% effective vaccine in preventing severe illness seems like a pretty good middle ground when the shots are incredibly cheap and incredibly easy to transport, especially in contrast to the Pfizer and Moderna shots. And the possibility of an efficacy almost as high as these other expensive and super cold storage ones.
I thought the concept was to save people's lives, then if herd immunity follows, then this is good. Bring on Oxford.
 

lovetravellingoz

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Interesting back and forth within the expert circles.

I'm not sure if a lower effectiveness even matters? Sure if you want herd immunity it does, but in the real world without a 100% effective vaccine anywhere on the planet, a 100% effective vaccine in preventing severe illness seems like a pretty good middle ground when the shots are incredibly cheap and incredibly easy to transport, especially in contrast to the Pfizer and Moderna shots. And the possibility of an efficacy almost as high as these other expensive and super cold storage ones.
Well with the cases we currently have in Australia we will be relying on the data from overseas and the vast majority of people that will get vaccinated here will not get exposed to the virus for a long time after they are vaccinated. Maybe a year or so depending in when the international border is freely opened up.
 

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I thought the concept was to save people's lives, then if herd immunity follows, then this is good. Bring on Oxford.
I thought so too.

The medical fraternity is also seemingly split about following schedule of vaccination vs requirement of giving any level of protection possible in areas besieged by the virus (i.e. second doses later).

No easy answers but a little protection is better than none. There apparently is little fear or concern of the virus evolving to be immune to the vaccines if not fully immunised per schedule, which would be my primary reservation.
 
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