The COVID-19 vaccine rollout in Australia has begun

justinbrett

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Nope. Feds dropped the ball. Putting all our eggs in four picks was appalling decision. Other countries backed 8-12, not us. Just incompetent.
Not countries of 25 million

I think we backed 4 - which were spread out over the different technologies to ensure greater chance of success

The thinking back then was to ensure you got the working vaccine. Despite your "12-14 months ago" post, this time 12 months ago many people were saying we'd never get a working vaccine, that there had never been a coronavirus vaccine, that covid would mutate faster than we could keep up with etc. To think we ended up with several working vaccines is a miracle in this short timeframe.

Couple this with how they secured a local manufacturing capability - something that only a handful of countries have - incompetent is not a fair assessment. It's not an A, but it's not an F.
 
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I think the attacks on state CHOs should cease. AFF should not be a forum for such.
I completely agree!

Moving on, one question that is largely unanswered on this forum is what impact the vaccine rollout will have specifically on travel both domestic and international. I read further up thread that NSW was willing to open its borders (both domestic and international) once the magic number of 10 million doses were administered. I would be curious whether we would see these border openings occur in a coordinated manner or whether it will be a haphazard approach as we see today. At the same time, in the interim, when the bulk of Australians haven't been vaccinated how will the border situation work, especially for those who have been fully vaccinated? Will they be given special benefits for raising their sleeve early to get the jab?

Your Travelling,
KangarooFlyer88
 
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Lynda2475

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attacks on state CHOs

I very much doubt the criticsm of certain CHOs in Qld and SA has anything to do with their gender and more to do with some of their advice and recent gaffs which contained racist/xenophic coments and cautions about footballs.
 
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Lynda2475

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Moving on, one question that is largely unanswered on this forum is what impact the vaccine rollout will have specifically on travel both domestic and international.

Thats because there are specific threads for those discussion:



 

justinbrett

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I think the attacks on state CHOs should cease. AFF should not be a forum for such.

I was referring to the QLD CHO specifically where they have openly admitted to making decisions on non-health grounds (including the infamous exemptions for people bringing money into Queensland) and seems very close to the premier - and has now been appointed the Governor.

I think their comments today on the AZ vaccine will have damage to the over 60s vaccination rate in QLD and the QLD vaccine rate overall and she needs to be held to account for that.

CHOs are public officials and are not beyond scrutiny. To suggest otherwise is dangerous.
 

antycbr

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Went to the Sydney Olympic Park hub today. Very busy but was through in an hour for dose 1.

Surprised they didn’t use a more accessible location with some more shelter, eg some of the Showground halls. However this looked like it was chosen as vacant office space.

My main suggestion for improvement would be to have public address systems in the queue areas and some clear markers for each time group (they do 30 min blocks, so up to four groups of people can be forming at any one time as people arrive way early).
 

Princess Fiona

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Went to the Sydney Olympic Park hub today. Very busy but was through in an hour for dose 1.

Surprised they didn’t use a more accessible location with some more shelter, eg some of the Showground halls. However this looked like it was chosen as vacant office space.

My main suggestion for improvement would be to have public address systems in the queue areas and some clear markers for each time group (they do 30 min blocks, so up to four groups of people can be forming at any one time as people arrive way early).
I think it was way busier than normal today due to a rush of under 40’s without appointments turning up in hopes of getting AZ.
Watched a segment on Ch7 news tonight. I was there 3 weeks ago with my 3 daughters and nowhere near the lineup or wait time.

Clearly there is a lot of people who are eager to get vaccinated and that’s awesome. Let’s harness this through the GPs and get it done
 

Oneworldplus2

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Agree with the ABC

Our vaccine rollout has been choked by four big bungles — and they still haven't been fixed

Lots of people l speak to have all come to the same conclusion - the rollout has been terrible. Typical of a Government (both sides). Too hard to get a shot.

24/7 school ovals - bring in military to help and let it rip. Unpopular opinion - If the Government can get more vaccines and do a proper rollout, have a firm date where all restriction cease to exist (including interstate travel and quarantine) - say 20th September. Up to you if you want to get the jab or not. 1a/b, people with underlying health issues, indigenous people and persons over 60's should be vaccinated by now. 50% of the people l speak to in QLD don't want to get the jab, for whatever reason.
 
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Just thought I'd bring up some new research that just came out showing that in effect there is no risk of developing blood clots from the AstraZeneca vaccine if it is administered properly (e.g. injected into the muscle and not the vein). If then ends up being fully validated, this would be a complete game-changer for vaccinations here since all a nurse would need to do before injecting the vaccine would be to pull back the syringe to ensure blood is not being drawn (and if it is throw out the dose and try again). Here's a video summary of the research from Dr. Campbell, a nurse practicing in the UK.

Your Trusty,
KangarooFlyer88
 

drron

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Just thought I'd bring up some new research that just came out showing that in effect there is no risk of developing blood clots from the AstraZeneca vaccine if it is administered properly (e.g. injected into the muscle and not the vein). If then ends up being fully validated, this would be a complete game-changer for vaccinations here since all a nurse would need to do before injecting the vaccine would be to pull back the syringe to ensure blood is not being drawn (and if it is throw out the dose and try again). Here's a video summary of the research from Dr. Campbell, a nurse practicing in the UK.

Your Trusty,
KangarooFlyer88
Sorry that is not true. The blood clots are due to the body forming antibodies to platelets in response to the vaccine.It doesn't matter which way it gets into the body.Giving in the upper arm means little chance it would be given into a vein anyway.
 

levelnine

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As the saying goes you can get any statistic to prove your point.

It depends on your metric (we have a very low total vaccination rate - but we are above the world average for first dosage rate - which is arguably much more important).

LOL I love these people trying to salvage Australia's abysmal vaccination rate. Do you work for the Government?

We are second last in the OECD for vaccinations per 100 people (ie at least one dose).

We are dead last in the OECD for fully vaccinated people per 100 people (ie first and second doses).
 
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Sorry that is not true. The blood clots are due to the body forming antibodies to platelets in response to the vaccine.It doesn't matter which way it gets into the body.Giving in the upper arm means little chance it would be given into a vein anyway.
I would encourage you to watch the video I shared. You are right that the odds of a nurse administering the jab into a vein in the arm is very rare there frankly aren't that many veins in the upper arm. However, a quick look at the textbook Gray's Anatomy shows that there still are some small veins up there. All I'm saying is that the exceedingly rare event of a nurse administering a vaccine into a vein is probably about the same likelihood as someone getting TTS. Could this be a sheer coincidence? Absolutely! But it has already been shown in several studies in the past that when these types of vaccines are injected into a vein, TTS can occur! Again, I strongly recommend watching the video from Dr. Campbell as at the very least it offers potential hope for this vaccine being extremely safe. If we can eliminate TTS then the only real objection to AstraZeneca would be its slightly lower efficacy against not catching COVID.

Your Trusty,
KangarooFlyer88
 

roogirl

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People have to remember that last year, AZ (Oxford as we then called it) was the absolute stand out as far as vaccine candidates go and was generally considered to be the best chance of success. The mRNA vax tech is brand new and nobody was betting their collective houses on it. We still haven't let the mRNA side effect issue play out and it could well be in the same position as AZ in three months.

We already had the failed UQ vax which we then switched to AZ.

There's actually not that many countries with a local manufacturing capability - it's unfortunate the AZ had the side effect it did, but it's still a working vaccine that many countries would desperately take off our hands if we don't want them.

They've also done pretty well to get the additional Pfizer doses which will start increasing from next month.

This could have been far, far worse.
The additional irony being that if they’d just smashed on with the vaccine rollout at pace from the moment that AZ started rolling off the production line they probably would have got a million jabs into arms before the AZ negative reporting started.
 

MooTime

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The additional irony being that if they’d just smashed on with the vaccine rollout at pace from the moment that AZ started rolling off the production line they probably would have got a million jabs into arms before the AZ negative reporting started.
Not in this country, we live in a covid zero country & so many here simply say, why get the jab with its blood clots when we don't have any covid.
As multi cultured as we are, not everybody has family O/s hanging to see & care or are happy to wait a few years to travel OS again.
No matter what the gov or companies like QF & VA offer, it's going to be a very tough sell getting those on the fence to come forward. A pity yes.
People also widely know you can still get covid when you've been fully vaccinated, so why bother.
We are slow at Vax uptake for that reason imo.
But I'm absolutely up for vac & will be double pfizered next week.
 

sanne

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I would encourage you to watch the video I shared. You are right that the odds of a nurse administering the jab into a vein in the arm is very rare there frankly aren't that many veins in the upper arm. However, a quick look at the textbook Gray's Anatomy shows that there still are some small veins up there. All I'm saying is that the exceedingly rare event of a nurse administering a vaccine into a vein is probably about the same likelihood as someone getting TTS. Could this be a sheer coincidence? Absolutely! But it has already been shown in several studies in the past that when these types of vaccines are injected into a vein, TTS can occur! Again, I strongly recommend watching the video from Dr. Campbell as at the very least it offers potential hope for this vaccine being extremely safe. If we can eliminate TTS then the only real objection to AstraZeneca would be its slightly lower efficacy against not catching COVID.

Your Trusty,
KangarooFlyer88
We watched this video and have been watching him since the start of the pandemic back in Jan 20.

My husband and I both asked the nurse to aspirate before giving us our jab. No problem. It’s the way my husband for all his working life gave vaccines. When did this change?
 

drron

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I would encourage you to watch the video I shared. You are right that the odds of a nurse administering the jab into a vein in the arm is very rare there frankly aren't that many veins in the upper arm. However, a quick look at the textbook Gray's Anatomy shows that there still are some small veins up there. All I'm saying is that the exceedingly rare event of a nurse administering a vaccine into a vein is probably about the same likelihood as someone getting TTS. Could this be a sheer coincidence? Absolutely! But it has already been shown in several studies in the past that when these types of vaccines are injected into a vein, TTS can occur! Again, I strongly recommend watching the video from Dr. Campbell as at the very least it offers potential hope for this vaccine being extremely safe. If we can eliminate TTS then the only real objection to AstraZeneca would be its slightly lower efficacy against not catching COVID.

Your Trusty,
KangarooFlyer88
I watched the video.A substance doesn't have to get into the bloodstream to trigger the production of antibodies.
Australian doctors and nurses have always been trained to pull back to see no blood comes back anyway yet we have still had cases of TTS.
Besides anatomically there is little chance of injecting directly into a vein.All the large veins run in the axilla not over the shoulder in virtually all people.There are some such as those with severe liver disease where the veins over the shoulder are enlarged.Should be fairly obvious then.
 

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