Predictions of when international flights may resume/bans lifted

dajop

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Today has been a bad mental health day in .sg

I thought that yesterday was nothing more than most people were expecting anyway. The bad mental health day(s) in my circle was(were) a few days ago, when cases jumped from 0 to 60 in a short period of time and then kept on going up from there at a speed not seen before in .sg outside the fences of the dormitories .... It was so deflating to get to 0 one day and then have hopes dashed just 3 days later.
 

sjk

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I thought that yesterday was nothing more than most people were expecting anyway. The bad mental health day(s) in my circle was(were) a few days ago, when cases jumped from 0 to 60 in a short period of time and then kept on going up from there at a speed not seen before in .sg outside the fences of the dormitories .... It was so deflating to get to 0 one day and then have hopes dashed just 3 days later.
I was also referring to the continuing fallout over the school killing, which has upset many of my Singapore-based team.
 

JB expat

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International vaccination ‘passports’ may be available from October

By Katina Curtis

Prime Minister Scott Morrison estimates vaccination “passports” that will be recognised internationally and be able to be carried digitally on smartphones will be available in October.
The concept of certificates recognised around the world has been a topic of conversation with leaders at meetings such as the G7 and APEC, he says.

“We already have vaccine certificates [in Australia],” Mr Morrison says.
“Later in the year, about October we estimate, we will have a vaccination certificate that will be able to be ... internationally recognised to facilitate when people are moving out of the country and into the country, being able to recognise others’ certificates, that is something that has been a common feature of the conversations I have been having with other leaders.”
 

roogirl

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International vaccination ‘passports’ may be available from October

By Katina Curtis

Prime Minister Scott Morrison estimates vaccination “passports” that will be recognised internationally and be able to be carried digitally on smartphones will be available in October.
The concept of certificates recognised around the world has been a topic of conversation with leaders at meetings such as the G7 and APEC, he says.

“We already have vaccine certificates [in Australia],” Mr Morrison says.
“Later in the year, about October we estimate, we will have a vaccination certificate that will be able to be ... internationally recognised to facilitate when people are moving out of the country and into the country, being able to recognise others’ certificates, that is something that has been a common feature of the conversations I have been having with other leaders.”
That will be helpful for all the politicians and sports people - one less piece of paper to carry out of the island prison
 

mviy

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I expect around that timeframe it may become much harder to get an exemption to travel without being vaccinated. They may start to make it a condition of exemptions that the traveller is fully vaccinated prior to departure except for compassionate reasons.
 

roogirl

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More on opening international borders - definitely getting louder

Unfortunately that does nothing to move public sentiment as the reaction is just “well those jobs should be going to Aussies anyway!”. Have seen it before.
 

Flashback

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Unfortunately that does nothing to move public sentiment as the reaction is just “well those jobs should be going to Aussies anyway!”. Have seen it before.

Likewise in mining. The economy isn't looking so strong now, eh?
 
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Must...Fly!

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Unfortunately that does nothing to move public sentiment as the reaction is just “well those jobs should be going to Aussies anyway!”. Have seen it before.
It'll change quick when people realise this isn't a cry out for cheaper skills, it's a cry out for skilled people of any kind.
 

dajop

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It'll change quick when people realise this isn't a cry out for cheaper skills, it's a cry out for skilled people of any kind.
You assume a degree of sophistication in the mainstream media to discuss this problem and enough of a “care factor” in the swinging voter cohort in the marginal electorates that probably just doesn’t exist.
 

hb13

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Isn’t it a bit early to draw that conclusion?

Of course, at the moment, the vaccination rates are unacceptable,

So you are agreeing with me? Of course I'm talking about right now.

Regarding supply and scare tactics re AZ vaccine, that's all part of the issue that needs to be resolved. Every country has had many issues, yet, rates a few months after the rollout started were very high (Australia has been vaccinating for five months now).
 

N860CR

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Unfortunately behind a paywall.
Key focus is below. Quite a fairly written article, frustratingly it’s doesn’t play well with the general populous (my bolding)

We used to accept the 1000 to 2000 deaths each year from the flu as a fair price for the freedom to carry on.

We still consider the more than 1100 people who die on our roads each year an acceptable price for our freedom to drive. We think 6000 deaths from alcohol each year is a bargain for the freedom to drink.

Yet just one virus death of a 90-year-old is a national tragedy, to be announced at a press conference as justification for making Australians stay at home.

Blame much of this fear on the exaggerations of “experts”.
 

Ric

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Of course, at the moment, the vaccination rates are unacceptable, but isn’t the problem right now one of supply (of the darling-vaccine) ? Only once the supply of Pfizer ramps up will iit be possible to judge true vaccine hesitancy and a likely eventual rate?

I wouldn’t be surprised, once Pfizer is on tap, that demand from the younger generation skyrockets - as long as there is a potential path out of ongoing lockdowns.
And I have not read or heard of any indication that our Dear Leader has been on the phone to the Head of Pfizer (Global) or our Great Ally (who always has our back) seeking early deliveries (as in yesterday) more Pfizer and or Moderna.
 
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bcworld

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MEL_Traveller

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Key focus is below. Quite a fairly written article, frustratingly it’s doesn’t play well with the general populous (my bolding)

We used to accept the 1000 to 2000 deaths each year from the flu as a fair price for the freedom to carry on.

We still consider the more than 1100 people who die on our roads each year an acceptable price for our freedom to drive. We think 6000 deaths from alcohol each year is a bargain for the freedom to drink.

Yet just one virus death of a 90-year-old is a national tragedy, to be announced at a press conference as justification for making Australians stay at home.

Blame much of this fear on the exaggerations of “experts”.

I'm not sure if that reasoning holds true.

The thing is we don't 'accept' 1000+ roads deaths a year. The aim of most governments is now along the lines of 'towards zero'. Driving is highly regulated... seat belts, severe speed limits in cities, limits of engine capacity for new drivers, speed cameras, can't even touch your phone while the engine is running. There are severe penalties including gaol if your driving causes injury to others.

Aviation... we don't accept a single death there. The entire MAX fleet was grounded, as have other models when problems occur. A single accident can impose multi-million dollar obligations on airlines to fix an issue or change procedures.

Alcohol is also highly regulated. There are multiple restrictions and bans in place to regulate its use and minimise its harm. I'd argue we don't 'accept' alcohol related deaths.

I don't think we accept the flu either... but we have a vaccine for that. We also have the 'no jab, no play' policy for other diseases. A 'freedom' taken away from people for arguably a very limited benefit (given most kids are willingly vaccinated by parents, why impose such a draconian measure for the remaining few who refuse?)

I'm note sure there is exaggeration by experts. We saw India, USA, Europe, UK, South America....
 

Pushka

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Given that within a year or so of the terrorist attacks in Bali, tourists were flocking back, and again a couple of years later, I think our appetite for the management of risk is a lot greater than some might think. We have absolutely no control over terrorist attacks, we do have some degree of control over flu and now covid, plus all the other viral illnesses and that is vaccination.
 

JB expat

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Key focus is below. Quite a fairly written article, frustratingly it’s doesn’t play well with the general populous (my bolding)

We used to accept the 1000 to 2000 deaths each year from the flu as a fair price for the freedom to carry on.

We still consider the more than 1100 people who die on our roads each year an acceptable price for our freedom to drive. We think 6000 deaths from alcohol each year is a bargain for the freedom to drink.

Yet just one virus death of a 90-year-old is a national tragedy, to be announced at a press conference as justification for making Australians stay at home.

Blame much of this fear on the exaggerations of “experts”.
I think that this would read much better if "the Pfizer" was readily available so that anyone/everyone who wanted a jab could have one. That is the "seatbelt" to continue the analogy used above. The vaccine rollout is the single most important factor and the impact/consequences of the delay cannot be under estimated.
 

MEL_Traveller

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Given that within a year or so of the terrorist attacks in Bali, tourists were flocking back, and again a couple of years later, I think our appetite for the management of risk is a lot greater than some might think. We have absolutely no control over terrorist attacks, we do have some degree of control over flu and now covid, plus all the other viral illnesses and that is vaccination.

Acceptance of risk is a strange beast. People might have gone back to Bali, but on their way to Bali they will absolutely refuse to fly Garuda because it's 'unsafe'. But they'll fly there on Air Asia or Malaysia Airlines 🤷‍♂️
 
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