Dodgy Call Claiming to be QFF Program Representative

Status
Not open for further replies.

DMMatlin

Junior Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2009
Messages
32
Points
75
I've received numerous calls this morning advising that my QFF Number has been selected to receive a $999 credit. The call starts with an automated voice recording and connects to an overseas call center. I immediately triggered this to be a scam of some sort and ended the call. But the process has reoccurred a couple more times this morning.

The interesting thing is that the call is coming in on a number only connected to my QFF profile. Mrs DM, also a QFF, has also received the same call this morning.

Called the QFF Service Center to check the validity of the promotion... And they confirm that this isn't a legitimate call.

Of the joy of internet bookings, shared loyalty programs, etc. Not sure that I'd actually connected the following dots... Adding my QFF number to a hotel booking means that the hotel has access to my data within the QFF program (phone numbers and maybe more)... Makes sense when I stop and think about it, just hadn't thought through the implications of it.

Be aware all you points chasers out there... Where's your data ending up! :eek:
 

OzEire

Established Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2013
Messages
1,365
Points
10
That is annoying. Seems to happen more and more often.

You have a number "only connected with your QFF profile" ? If you have never used this number anywhere else then it could only have come from QF sharing your details with a third party- that would be a concern.
 

mannej

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 16, 2009
Messages
9,876
Solutions
5
Points
1,000
VA have also had the same occur recently. Perhaps it is like those receiving the Microsoft calls when they only have an apple - I.e opportunistic and not actually linked to QF or VA numbers at all.
 
S

sampson

Guest
Who'd believe Qantas actually has real people you can talk to for free.

Unbeeeelievable. :p
 

ketsuzei

Established Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2009
Messages
1,067
Points
475
opportunistic and not actually linked to QF or VA numbers at all

Seems highly likely. Any phone number can be targeted randomly by scammers, no matter where it has or hasn't been revealed to legitimate businesses.
 
Possibly the best subscription service on the planet, designed specially by whisky lovers for whisky lovers. Join the club to grow your collection and drink great whisky.

AFF Supporters can remove this and all advertisements

harvyk

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2009
Messages
6,865
Points
980
Qantas
Gold
VA have also had the same occur recently. Perhaps it is like those receiving the Microsoft calls when they only have an apple - I.e opportunistic and not actually linked to QF or VA numbers at all.

It's the way a scammer works. They are much like fishermen (thus the term phishing), they cast a wide net out and hope they catch someone in it. They know that 99.9% of people will realise it's a scam or not be in the target group, however it's that 1 in 1000 person who does fall for it which makes it worthwhile for them.
 

SeatBackForward

Established Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2006
Messages
4,297
Points
735
The skeptic in me wonders how much of these phone scammers can be traced back to the outsourcing of so much data processing by Australian businesses? Did they truly believe that all the confidentiality agreements would be upheld? particularly in countries where the rule of law isn't on par with our standard? I'd say its another example of lazy IT Managers managing risk by contractual arrangements rather than any actual measures.
 

burmans

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2006
Messages
7,703
Solutions
1
Points
1,010
The skeptic in me wonders how much of these phone scammers can be traced back to the outsourcing of so much data processing by Australian businesses? Did they truly believe that all the confidentiality agreements would be upheld? particularly in countries where the rule of law isn't on par with our standard? I'd say its another example of lazy IT Managers managing risk by contractual arrangements rather than any actual measures.
The skeptic in me would suggest thats an easy claim to make but harder to actually prove!

Actually one of the provisions in the recently changed Privacy Act was introduced to try and combat this.[h=3]APP 8 — Cross-border disclosure of personal information[/h]Only time will tell if they are effective but the law tries to put more responsibility back on the Australian company when they send data to companies overseas (or allow it to be accessed from overseas) that they take reasonable steps to ensure this WILL comply with out Privacy laws. In my opinion though, in time this will lead to less outsourcing as it becomes obvious that in many cases it is not reasonable to assume the relevant Australian Laws are being complied with (e.g. cases like this).
 

QF WP

Enthusiast
Moderator
Joined
Jun 20, 2002
Messages
18,023
Points
1,570
Qantas
Gold
Virgin
Platinum
I'd be taking them off track and saying that you aren't a QFF member, but you do have Velocity...do you know about how good that program is...and start a vapid verbal barrage about the differences, anything to waste their time... :D
 
Joined
May 20, 2011
Messages
6,987
Points
1,330
Qantas
Platinum
To be honest it has become almost impossible to trust any phone call or e-mail you get - we've stopped making donations over the phone because how do you know where you credit card details end up. Today I received an invitation to connect with someone on Linked in and it ended up being a Nigerian scam - the profile is genuine, but everything after that is not!
 

harvyk

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2009
Messages
6,865
Points
980
Qantas
Gold
The skeptic in me wonders how much of these phone scammers can be traced back to the outsourcing of so much data processing by Australian businesses? Did they truly believe that all the confidentiality agreements would be upheld? particularly in countries where the rule of law isn't on par with our standard? I'd say its another example of lazy IT Managers managing risk by contractual arrangements rather than any actual measures.

Whilst I'm sure that scammers would love to get hold of such lists, in a lottery scam like this one access to such lists are not overly useful. What they are after are people who are easily excited and accept things on face value. As a result you'll probably find the scammers are more targeting geographic regions than actual or perceived customer lists. The former is something that the white pages would be as useful to you as attempting to buy customer lists.
 

SeatBackForward

Established Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2006
Messages
4,297
Points
735
Whilst I'm sure that scammers would love to get hold of such lists, in a lottery scam like this one access to such lists are not overly useful. What they are after are people who are easily excited and accept things on face value. As a result you'll probably find the scammers are more targeting geographic regions than actual or perceived customer lists. The former is something that the white pages would be as useful to you as attempting to buy customer lists.

But doesn't explain how a number that is only linked to a QFF profile, is specifically targeted with a QFF scam call.
 

ketsuzei

Established Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2009
Messages
1,067
Points
475
But doesn't explain how a number that is only linked to a QFF profile, is specifically targeted with a QFF scam call.

They could call any number at random and there'd be a fair chance of a QFF member picking up. Qantas is as much a victim in this sort of scam as anyone else.
 

harvyk

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2009
Messages
6,865
Points
980
Qantas
Gold
But doesn't explain how a number that is only linked to a QFF profile, is specifically targeted with a QFF scam call.

Random chance. If it was a phone number only callable by QFF (and by that I mean one that I could not call using the phone sitting next to me right now) then that's a different story. It might be one that only QFF knows about, but the reality is it can still take calls made from almost anywhere in the world.
 

harvyk

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2009
Messages
6,865
Points
980
Qantas
Gold
They could call any number at random and there'd be a fair chance of a QFF member picking up. Qantas is as much a victim in this sort of scam as anyone else.

Since there are now 10 million members, lets assume at least half of those are Australian (and it's probably much higher), with roughly 23 million Australians that gives the scammers a better than 1 in 5 chance the random number they just called happens to belong to a QFF member.
 

Katy

Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2012
Messages
428
Points
220
My mother got the Virgin version of this scam and they asked for her by name, so it's not just random dialling of numbers and hoping someone picks up.
 

burmans

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2006
Messages
7,703
Solutions
1
Points
1,010
Since there are now 10 million members, lets assume at least half of those are Australian (and it's probably much higher), with roughly 23 million Australians that gives the scammers a better than 1 in 5 chance the random number they just called happens to belong to a QFF member.
Yes , you just beat me to it. If you take childern out of the equation you'd be looking at probably 60% hit rate. That's more than enough for scammers to make something of, given they send out emails hoping you have an ANZ/WBC etc account.
 

RAM

Established Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2011
Messages
3,146
Points
700
I received the Velocity call in mid May from an Indian call centre after an automated 'Australian' Virgin-like accent intro. Very credible start along the lines of;

"We at Virgin like to reward our loyal customers when they least expect it. That's the Virgin way." Or words to that effect. Then went on to say hold on while we get you to speak to one of our team members. Cue the Indian call centre.
Within a few seconds it is clearly a scam (if you are a born sceptic) but if you are distracted (call was around dinner time on a weekday) then who knows.

What I like to do is say that someone has just come to the front door can you please hold on as the offer sounds great and I really want to take you up on it. Then leave the phone off the hook until you get the disconnected tone.

Unfortunately that call only waited for just under 4 minutes.
 

Red Roo

Established Member
Joined
Oct 8, 2010
Messages
1,746
Points
0
We're aware some customers are still receiving calls purporting to be from Qantas: Scam phone calls purporting to be from Qantas

We share your concerns regarding this ongoing scam, and are continuing to work with the relevant internal and external channels. If you've received such calls, we strongly encourage you to report them to SCAMwatch directly.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top