Do you like titles (eg Mr / Mrs / Miss / Dr / etc)?

Do you like to be called "Title" "Surname"?

  • Yes, I'm Mr / Miss / Mrs / Dr Surname and don't you forget it

    Votes: 11 15.5%
  • Depend on the situation

    Votes: 32 45.1%
  • I might have a last name, but I've forgotten what it is, just call me John / Jane.

    Votes: 28 39.4%

  • Total voters
    71
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k_sheep

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I absolutely abhor the convention of Miss vs Mrs vs Ms; why the heck should it change when you marry or whatever? Archaic and sexist drivel.

I go by Dr in most things to avoid this, but if that's not an option then it's Ms.

Of course in real life, it's first name all the way (especially since my surname is hard to pronounce and spell!)
 

astrosly

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Yes, I detest being addressed as "Mrs". Why should I always be addressed as such that adult female = married female?

Another pet hate is being addressed as "Madam". Madams run brothels. If you are going to address me in a generic term, even if my title and name is right in front of you, then please use "Ma'am".
 

defurax

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As stated in the other thread I really don't care about my title, most of the time the "Dr" is on the boarding pass because of the people booking the flights (i.e TA, meeting organisers, etc).

Though I have to admit that I enjoy the Japanese honorific suffix -san, defurax-san always makes me smile!:mrgreen:
 

anat0l

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-san? If it's not -sama then I'd wonder why they were being so rude. In a service context that is.

Not sure what you mean by the "rude service" bit...

IIRC -sama is reserved for those deserving greater respect, much more than -san (which is more or less common, but expected honorific).

-san essentially replaces the salutation but also is an honoring acknowledgement from the speaker. There are other endings which are used in casual or condescending speech (e.g. when someone of higher social rank is talking about or at someone of lower social rank). In some cases, -san is not used in favour of a person's position (most commonly teachers, e.g. "Tanaka-sensei" = (Mr/Ms) Tanaka, the teacher).

You would never use -san to refer to yourself.
 

wingspan

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Not sure what you mean by the "rude service" bit...

IIRC -sama is reserved for those deserving greater respect, much more than -san (which is more or less common, but expected honorific).

-san essentially replaces the salutation but also is an honoring acknowledgement from the speaker. There are other endings which are used in casual or condescending speech (e.g. when someone of higher social rank is talking about or at someone of lower social rank). In some cases, -san is not used in favour of a person's position (most commonly teachers, e.g. "Tanaka-sensei" = (Mr/Ms) Tanaka, the teacher).

You would never use -san to refer to yourself.

If I was welcomed as a customer on a flight or other service interaction as Wingspan-san I'd think they assumed my Japanese wasn't proficient enough to understand. Wingspan-sama is the appropriate way to refer to me in a service context.
 

anat0l

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If I was welcomed as a customer on a flight or other service interaction as Wingspan-san I'd think they assumed my Japanese wasn't proficient enough to understand. Wingspan-sama is the appropriate way to refer to me in a service context.

Ah right....now I properly understand you.

And you are correct.
 

Cossie

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I dislike being called 'sir' under any circumstances, after all I'm no better, nor worse than anybody else. I want to be treated with respect, as I like to think that I treat others, without being patronising.
Maybe it is my Quaker heritage coming to the surface.:)
 

defurax

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I dislike being called 'sir' under any circumstances, after all I'm no better, nor worse than anybody else. I want to be treated with respect, as I like to think that I treat others, without being patronising.
Maybe it is my Quaker heritage coming to the surface.:)

I don't think Sir is always used with respect...In the US/Canada you could be tasered to death while being told "Sir, please calm down":shock:
 

dajop

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I dislike being called 'sir' under any circumstances, after all I'm no better, nor worse than anybody else. I want to be treated with respect, as I like to think that I treat others, without being patronising.

But it depends on where you are the in the world. It is particularly common as a sign of respect is the Philippines, not patronising, just the way it is. Also seems to be quite common in parts of the US.
 
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At work I am Dr Scaredeycat, but I never use the term on other occasions. Too often it seems like an open invitation to tradesman and others to jack up their prices.
Must say I can't stand the practice of more junior staff when they introduce themselves to patients. "Hi, I'm John, and I'm one of the doctors". It sounds so unprofessional. My other hobby horse is dress standards - doctors no longer wear ties and even long sleeves have become verboten (infection risk). The world has gone mad!
 
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Princess Fiona

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At work I am Dr Scaredeycat, but I never use the term on other occasions. Too often it seems like an open invitation to tradesman and others to jack up their prices.
Must say I can't stand the practice of more junior staff when they introduce themselves to patients. "Hi, I'm John, and I'm one of the doctors". It sounds so unprofessional. My other hobby horse is dress standards - doctors no longer wear ties and even long sleeves have become verboten (infection risk). The world has gone mad!

Thank goodness I'm not one of your junior staff :shock:
Maybe that's where I'm going wrong? It's amazing how many times I can go through an entire consultation with an elderly patient (I'm wearing bright green scrubs with Dr emblazoned on the chest) for them to say at the end "Thankyou sister, when will I be seeing the doctor?" :oops:
 

Programme

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I have never introduced myself as Dr Surname - I find the thought of doing so slightly embarrassing. If you have come to see me in my professional capacity, you would already know that the proper title is Dr, and if it isn't in a professional capacity, there shouldn't be a need for a title at all.

In any written communication, it is always Dr for consistency, and staff usually refer to me as Dr Firstname. Having a long and difficult to pronounce surname means that I'm rarely addressed in the proper manner of Dr Surname. Agree that it's generational, it's the elderly that usually make the effort but I usually smile and say Dr Firstname is fine.

Interestingly, when addressed by name on aircraft, I have almost always been addressed as Mr Surname, despite this never appearing on the ticket. Not that I care.

It's amazing how many times I can go through an entire consultation with an elderly patient (I'm wearing bright green scrubs with Dr emblazoned on the chest) for them to say at the end "Thankyou sister, when will I be seeing the doctor?" :oops:

I've seen this happen so many times and it's always cringe worthy! The old biddy usually means no offence and it's awkward and embarrassing for both the doctor and patient when it has to be explained that the female doctor isn't a nurse.
 
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kelvedon

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I remember as an adolescent, the first time someone called me Mr Kelvedon, I turned round to look for my Dad.
 

aamslfc

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Have to echo some of the others here; I absolutely despise being called "Sir". Even "Mr" makes me cringe... I find most titles archaic and overly-formal, and I detest in equal measure the OTT treatment you sometimes get from certain Asian & ME carriers.

My natural instinct is to not use a title when referring to others except in a formal setting or if the situation demanded it, and I would expect the same treatment in return. Maybe I'm too egalitarian, but fawning and OTT formality are the last things I want in my life, especially when I'm travelling.
 

anat0l

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I remember as an adolescent, the first time someone called me Mr Kelvedon, I turned round to look for my Dad.

Still happens today when Dad and I are out together. "I'm looking for Mr <surname>," someone says. We pretty much both then ask, "Which one?"
 
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