Australian Reports of the Virus Spread

jase05

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Ok... more info now. So Nov 13 he was not breaching, but later he was:


• Big W Brickworks, South Rd, Torrensville - Sunday 22 November 12.15pm to 12.50pm
• Flinders University Sturt Campus, Bedford Park - 13 November to 28 November
• Foodland, The Parade, Norwood - Sunday 22 November 1.20pm to 2.00pm
• Kmart, Anzac Hwy, Kurralta Park - Sunday 22 November 2.45pm to 3.10pm

Add these locations now


-On The Run, Hilton - Nov 22, 12.05-12.15pm
-Anaconda, Mile End - Nov 22, 12.55-1.05pm
-Guzman y Gomez - Glandore Nov 22, 2.45-2.50pm
-Boost Juice, Glenelg - 22 Nov, 3.20-3.30pm
 

DC3

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Add these locations now


-On The Run, Hilton - Nov 22, 12.05-12.15pm
-Anaconda, Mile End - Nov 22, 12.55-1.05pm
-Guzman y Gomez - Glandore Nov 22, 2.45-2.50pm
-Boost Juice, Glenelg - 22 Nov, 3.20-3.30pm
Doesn’t sound like much of a quarantine.
 
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I have to agree with you. My point was more that the current situation has resulted from a central vacuum. There's been vague noises from Canberra but that's about it. On the whole, they've been happy to keep their heads down and fall back on health being a State responsibility.
I really don’t think that is true. I have listened to dozens (if not hundreds) of briefings by both Scomo and the Aus Chief Medical officers and deputies. Much of what has happened has been thrashed out in meetings with the premiers. However they can only do so much when states are insisting their way is best.
 

love_the_life

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For the person to leave quarantine and visit a number of shops, what was the security like? Or were they quarantining at home? I can't believe that if they were in a hotel they were able to wander out given the experience of other states.
 

Pushka

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For the person to leave quarantine and visit a number of shops, what was the security like? Or were they quarantining at home? I can't believe that if they were in a hotel they were able to wander out given the experience of other states.
There were in the second rim. At home but still needing two tests They had been in quarantine for maybe 8 days then on the 22nd decided to exit before the second test required before being allowed out of home. It was last Sunday they started sprinkling their fairy dust. Everywhere around metro Adelaide it seems.

Seems I beat the rush. Test done within 45 minutes but as I left it became bedlam and so many cars lining up. The testing staff didn’t know of the announcement.
 
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For the person to leave quarantine and visit a number of shops, what was the security like? Or were they quarantining at home? I can't believe that if they were in a hotel they were able to wander out given the experience of other states.
As I understand it they were a casual contact so one of the thousands who were quarantining at home. In Canberra all quarantining people are visited daily at home by the police, but that might not be possible given the large numbers?
 

love_the_life

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There were in the second rim. At home but still needing two tests They had been in quarantine for maybe 8 days then on the 22nd decided to exit before the second test required before being allowed out of home. It was last Sunday they started sprinkling their fairy dust. Everywhere around metro Adelaide it seems.

Seems I beat the rush. Test done within 45 minutes but as I left it became bedlam and so many cars lining up. The testing staff didn’t know of the announcement.

As I understand it they were a casual contact so one of the thousands who were quarantining at home. In Canberra all quarantining people are visited daily at home by the police, but that might not be possible given the large numbers?
That explains it then - mongrel - couldn't manage to do the right thing, From the large number of places visited sounds like they had quite a day out so not even able to plead something was 'urgent' (which is not an excuse anyway).
 

Pushka

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As I understand it they were a casual contact so one of the thousands who were quarantining at home. In Canberra all quarantining people are visited daily at home by the police, but that might not be possible given the large numbers?
Several thousand were released today so think they are down to about 1200 or so now. More manageable. It’s killed off the idea of home iso for overseas travellers though.
 

Pushka

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So it seems like I would have been contacted by SA Health
"All retail outlets had been contacted, she said, to get hold of credit card and loyalty card details “for those time points” to help contact tracers urgently try to track down as many people as possible."
 

nutwood

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I really don’t think that is true. I have listened to dozens (if not hundreds) of briefings by both Scomo and the Aus Chief Medical officers and deputies. Much of what has happened has been thrashed out in meetings with the premiers. However they can only do so much when states are insisting their way is best.
I understand the point you are making but I really can't agree. Yes there's been plenty of talk but the results speak for themselves. What we currently have is a regulatory mess and after the better part of a year, it's not getting any better. I understand the states of emergency and the wild panic when the pandemic started, but here we are, months down the track and we still don't have a national policy that anyone takes any notice of. That's a failure of leadership.
 

N860CR

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That explains it then - mongrel - couldn't manage to do the right thing, From the large number of places visited sounds like they had quite a day out so not even able to plead something was 'urgent' (which is not an excuse anyway).

Sadly, it’s just not practical to be directing thousands of people to isolate with very limited support, especially when these people feel perfectly healthy. It’s all well and good to attack these people, but for 6 months now South Australia has gone about life as if nothing is happening so it’s very difficult to turn on a tap and tell people to change their behavior overnight.

Mongrel? Maybe. But he’s got a horrific virus that’s we’re all terrified of, hasn’t he, surely that’s punishment enough.
 

Pushka

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Mongrel? Maybe. But he’s got a horrific virus that’s we’re all terrified of, hasn’t he, surely that’s punishment enough
Not really. His actions last Sunday and as recently as the day he tested positive may have brought on the second wave. It’s been eight days of unknown spread.

If, heaven forbid, it comes to pass I am positive, or anyone tests positive as a result of this, I have been to two Bunnings stores, a medical practice, an X-ray place, Ikea multiple times, visited grandchild, lived with husband who also consults with people face to face on a Monday, shopped at numerous supermarkets, been to Central Market, and other places on my credit card. Just this last 7 days. Do the maths.
 
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N860CR

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Not really. His actions last Sunday and as recently as the day he tested positive may have brought on the second wave. It’s been eight days of unknown spread.

If, heaven forbid, it comes to pass I am positive, or anyone tests positive as a result of this, I have been to two Bunnings stores, a medical practice, an X-ray place, Ikea multiple times, visited grandchild, lived with husband who also consults with people face to face on a Monday, shopped at numerous supermarkets, been to Central Market, and other places on my credit card. Just this last 7 days. Do the maths.
This is all about the big scary virus, so I don’t understand why actually getting said virus isn’t seen as something awful
 

Pushka

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This is all about the big scary virus, so I don’t understand why actually getting said virus isn’t seen as something awful
It’s very scary. So is risking giving it to so many people when you’ve been told to quarantine and you’ve had contact with someone who is positive.

I would hate to get Covid. But I dread giving it to someone else. Even unknowingly.

This guy knew he was positive yet when to Uni last week.
 

N860CR

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Still needs further punishment to prevent others doing the same.

Ah but what could be worse? This virus is so horrific we shut the country down. We can’t even consider going to WA because the virus once existed in some states.

I think my subtleties are being missed. The point I’m making is that it’s not a practical solution to lock people up when there’s nothing wrong with them at 30 seconds notice and to provide no support. It’s an action we use for criminals, not innocent people (who are supposedly so sick they’d need help) and we cannot expect a rational response from people.
 

love_the_life

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Sadly, it’s just not practical to be directing thousands of people to isolate with very limited support, especially when these people feel perfectly healthy. It’s all well and good to attack these people, but for 6 months now South Australia has gone about life as if nothing is happening so it’s very difficult to turn on a tap and tell people to change their behavior overnight.

Mongrel? Maybe. But he’s got a horrific virus that’s we’re all terrified of, hasn’t he, surely that’s punishment enough.
Most people in Melbourne seemed to manage with very little notice - and this person did not have do more than 14 days - so maybe I should say his behaviour was mongrel (as I have no personal knowledge of the person) for putting himself ahead of hundreds of Adelaide citizens he would have come in contact with.
And the lack of warning - there was a reason he was quarantined and as it turns out, a very good reason. Regardless of whether there had been 6 months of 'normality' surely someone who has been following the news even at a shallow level would be aware of the seriousness of this and I would think would want to do the right thing.
This wasn't just popping out to get some milk - it was a full on shopping expedition. Very poor.
 
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RooFlyer

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I understand the point you are making but I really can't agree. Yes there's been plenty of talk but the results speak for themselves. What we currently have is a regulatory mess and after the better part of a year, it's not getting any better. I understand the states of emergency and the wild panic when the pandemic started, but here we are, months down the track and we still don't have a national policy that anyone takes any notice of. That's a failure of leadership.

Surely its a 'failure' of the Constitution? The feds could decree a 'national policy' (I think they have in several aspects), but most of the states would simply ignore it. Then what?

I don't think coming in hard over the top with federal powers could be counted as 'leadership'.
 

Pushka

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Most people in Melbourne seemed to manage with very little notice - and this person did not have do more than 14 days - so maybe I should say his behaviour was mongrel (as I have no personal knowledge of the person) for putting himself ahead of hundreds of Adelaide citizens he would have come in contact with.
And the lack of warning - there was a reason he was quarantined and as it turns out, a very good reason. Regardless of whether there had been 6 months of 'normality' surely someone who has been following the news even at a shallow level would be aware of the seriousness of this and I would think would want to do the right thing.
This wasn't just popping out to get some milk - it was a full on shopping expedition. Very poor.
Agree. He visited so many popular places. On the first day out after all those who weren't in quarantine, were allowed out. He had been in quarantine for a week by then and must have had at least one test. And as you say, if they had been pharmacies and Drs places, then understandable. KMart? Big W? Anaconda? Juice Bar? Nup.
 
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Surely its a 'failure' of the Constitution? The feds could decree a 'national policy' (I think they have in several aspects), but most of the states would simply ignore it. Then what?

I don't think coming in hard over the top with federal powers could be counted as 'leadership'.
They developed many national guidelines and policies - I saw them outlined in the daily briefings. But the states decided which bits they wanted to follow and which to ignore. Hotspot definitions is a case in point.

However frustrating I still look overseas and think we are so much better off.
 

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