Australian Reports of the Virus Spread

MEL_Traveller

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I never said forcibly.

I know in one case the residents delayed for a little while before accepting the recommendation to move.


In this case if the two do not move, then I would imagine Plan B would be to offer their neighbours the ability to relocate.

The common sense approach would be to be willing to move to reduce the risk for their neighbours.

I think there could be cases where the immediate health and safety of children or vulnerable people within the same household could require the removal of an infected person.
 

HappyFlyerFamily

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I never said forcibly.

I know in one case the residents delayed for a little while before accepting the recommendation to move.


In this case if the two do not move, then I would imagine Plan B would be to offer their neighbours the ability to relocate.

The common sense approach would be to be willing to move to reduce the risk for their neighbours.
A nice option would be to move the neighbours to a plush 5-star hotel (not one designated for covid or quarantine)
 

Must...Fly!

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I think there could be cases where the immediate health and safety of children or vulnerable people within the same household could require the removal of an infected person.
Surely that should be up to the decision of the person concerned, unless in a very specific setting where the manager of the facility has a responsibility for the well-being of other residents (e.g. aged care)
 

lovetravellingoz

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People in household quarantine are offered choices.

For example some who were asked to quarantine were asked to do test immediately and refused. So it meant that anyone else in their household also had to do the full 14 day quarantine.

If they did not do a Day 13/14 test the consequence was that their quarantine period was a 14 day extension (ie 28 days in total if you did not get tested).

Though some things are not choices. ie They cannot leave their residence.
 

lovetravellingoz

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A nice option would be to move the neighbours to a plush 5-star hotel (not one designated for covid or quarantine)
A bad option. That would place everyone in that hotel at risk including the staff.

The neighbours have presumably all been potentially exposed and could turn positive. This has happened recently already. Some of those in quarantine have tested positive on Days 13/14.

So they either must quarantine their building, or in HQ.

So two can be selfish, or two can choose that their neighbours have an easier time and less risk.

If the story is true, hopefully once they think it over they will accept to move to HQ.
 

HappyFlyerFamily

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A bad option. That would place everyone in that hotel at risk including the staff.

The neighbours have presumably all been potentially exposed and could turn positive. This has happened recently already. Some of those in quarantine have tested positive on Days 13/14.

So they either must quarantine their building, or in HQ.

So two can be selfish, or two can choose that their neighbours have an easier time and less risk.

If the story is true, hopefully once they think it over they will accept to move to HQ.
Well everyone was in lockdown until yesterday. So I would guess exposure risk is limited
 

Pushka

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Forcibly? I recall the option being offered but that's all.

No one in this country should be forcibly relocated as a result of contracting COVID-19.
They have been in SA - even close contacts and not themselves positive. No choice. Around 100 in med hotels for about four more days.
 
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Seat0B

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Two female positive cases at a the complex have barricaded themselves in their room and refusing CQV transportation.
Remember when we saw TV News footage of people in Wuhan being manhandled from their homes to hospitals in the early days of the pandemic and we were all horrified. I recall thinking that could never happen here. Now, I am not so sure.
 

Must...Fly!

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They have been in SA - even close contacts and not themselves positive. No choice. Around 100 in med hotels for about four more days.
Yes, I was extremely critical of that.

Remember when we saw TV News footage of people in Wuhan being manhandled from their homes to hospitals in the early days of the pandemic and we were all horrified. I recall thinking that could never happen here. Now, I am not so sure.
Indeed. I want nothing to do with this kind of policy for COVID-19 in Australia. This is not ebola, MERS, or Hendra virus.
 

lovetravellingoz

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bcworld

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Outdoor masks for 8 LGAs. Mask penalty increasing to $500.

5km radius for 8 LGAs
 

hydrabyss

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Which lockdown restrictions are you comparing it to though? And which period of an outbreak?

The Stage 4 restrictions used at the height of the Vic Second Wave in Greater Melbourne were much harsher than the recent set of restrictions used in the most recent lockdown in Victoria. Stage-4 was ramped up to after earlier sets of restrictions were shown to not be halting rate of spread. In Victoria those harsh set of restrictions have not yet been used in full again. Some measures such as mask-wearing are now deployed much more rapidly though as it simply a measure that really does not impede people much at all.

And yes there is no one magic bullet, and it really is impossible to know the effect of any one particular measure.



I think you will find that they were in large part the recommendation of Prof Allen Cheng, so yes there were based on health advice. Cheng was very strong on minimising mixing. Though the curfew also just makes it much easier for the police to enforce the rules, and moreso at a time when the police themselves were often becoming cases themselves.

On Cheng’s first day at work on July 23 last year, more than 400 cases of coronavirus were reported in Victoria. Contact tracers had no hope of reaching the huge numbers of people that were testing positive and cases were rising exponentially.
Cheng soon realised that even if they made improvements to the contact tracing system, it would crumble if the numbers kept climbing. (My comment: the relevance now is that with Delta jumping from person to person in as little as 36 hours that contact tracing is now a much more difficult task than it was with Alpha).​
“That wasn’t such a difficult decision. When things are bad and getting worse, we need to do something pretty drastic to get these numbers down, to make things work again.”
Melbourne’s tough stage-four restrictions shortly followed, drafted in part by Cheng. A controversial 8pm night-time curfew was imposed and people were prohibited from going more than five kilometres from their home to exercise. Across the city there was the dispiriting sight of playgrounds cordoned off with tape.
“You agonise over it, is it really worth it?” he says.
“When I first talked to the premiere, I probably had to move to a stage 4 limit, or something more than he said.” It’s a $ 1 billion decision a week, you really are about it. Are you sure? “Professor Cheng said.
“I said, ’I’m going to go away and think a little more.’ I’m very aware that they are a very difficult decision and will affect 6.6 million people. “
The war against Covid remains a moving feast. Covid itself is evolving and circumstances always very. It is up to the NSW Gov and NSW Health to decide its own set of restrictions and how quick or slow it wants things to be. Though in large part at present, it is up tp the NSW population now in how they follow those restrictions, and how willing they are to get vaccinated with AZ (and all of Australia needs to embrace AZ more).

One thing we do now know is that Covid is most probably going to be around permanently (endemic) and just living in bubbles like we all have been doing in Australia is not sustainable and moreso now with the advent of Delta. And most likely the virus will only keep evolving making the bubbles just even more likely to burst.
I agree curfews could be useful where needed but with the current restrictions there should be no need. But maybe if there is a lack of compliance with the rules a localised curfew where needed could be applied. I just don't feel an area wide one will have little effect if you cannot have visitors anyway.
 

nutwood

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Surely that should be up to the decision of the person concerned, unless in a very specific setting where the manager of the facility has a responsibility for the well-being of other residents (e.g. aged care)
I'm not sure I can agree with the general philosophy behind this. For society to operate, the rights of the individual have to be subservient to the rights of society. To take it to an extreme, if someone has a mental illness and are running amok with a machete, the police will shoot them. That's a fairly severe abuse of their individual rights but necessary to protect society.
One would hope it wouldn't come to that for a virus but ultimately, I could see someone with Covid being forcibly re-located, regardless of whether they wanted to be.
 

Must...Fly!

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To take it to an extreme, if someone has a mental illness and are running amok with a machete, the police will shoot them.
Are these two people running amok in their apartment building coughing on everyone they see, and on to every common touch surface?

What a bizarre comparison for a policy of forced relocation from one's home.

Last I checked, parliament never passed a law that contracting COVID-19 was a punishable crime.
 

bcworld

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Gladys pretending not to hear the hard questions. Who is that guy? Is it Skynews?
 

MooTime

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Call me whatever you want. Good on them. No one should be forcibly relocated.
too right, can't force anyone out of their room / home.

The authorities could at least assist the 2 female's inside who have barricaded themselves inside by providing external door barricades aswell.
I mean if you want to barricade yourself from others from the inside, may aswell make it as secure as possible & from both sides.

Isn't that their objective? To isolate from the outsiders trying / attempting to remove them to a HQ location.

Can communicate by phone. Drone the food & supplies thru the window.
 

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