The COVID-19 vaccine rollout in Australia has begun

lovetravellingoz

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As harsh as it sounds, once everyone who can have a vaccine has a chance to, the numbers in the hospital and deaths should not count in terms of “the plan” and if there is an undue burden to the healthcare system, those with Covid should go to the bottom. There should be a max number of Covid beds in a limited number of hospitals chosen based on geography and population, and once they are full, no hospital access to save beds and bandwidth for other medical needs (and breakthrough Covid cases and those who are medically unable to get the vaccine). At some point, the harsh reality of the consequences of one's choice when it comes to getting the vaccine must come into play.


My point was more that the actual required vaccination level required for us to live the "new covid 19 normal life " will be determined by what is happening in our hospitals, and not the modelling.

It may be 60% of adults vaccinated works fine, or it may be 80% or 90%. The modelling is a guide, what happens in the hospitals will be the measure. If the vaccine does its job then the number of cases will no longer be that relevant. It will be then number of adverse outcomes (severe illness and death).


One advantage (now and not in the past when it was a disadvantage) that the UK has over Australia is that they are thought to have had about 20% of people who have had Covid 19. That in theory would mean that they need less adults vaccinated than we do in Australia (Though yes some overlap as some who have had Covid 19 and will still get vaccinated).
 
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HappyFlyerFamily

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Coming weeks? It's so frustrating how slow things are moving.
By not removing the informed consent, I'm guessing Vic authorities think they can hold off Delta until Pfizer has had two-dosed.

Before the Vic and NSW CHO (and their Premiers) were on the one page about informed consent. Of course circumstances 'rapidly' deteriorated in NSW.
 
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jakeseven7

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By not removing the informed consent, I'm guessing Vic authorities think they can hold off Delta until Pfizer has had two-dosed.

Before the Vic and NSW CHO (and their Premiers) were on the one page about informed consent. Of course circumstances 'rapidly' deteriorated in NSW.

Doubt VIC thinks that at all judging from past behaviour from Sutton, what we do know the VIC CHO is still hamstrung by the beloved ATAGI and is clearly working on a work around that doesn’t land them in a political / medical s-storm…
 

mviy

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Coming weeks? It's so frustrating how slow things are moving.
I agree. This should have been done ages ago. Also getting pharmacies providing to those 18+ as well in VIC.

If you take AZ 4 weeks apart you need 6 weeks to get a decent level of protection (2 weeks after second dose) prior to getting exposed. Longer if you wait longer between doses. Waiting for an outbreak to happen before implementing change seriously hinders the ability of vaccination to help to shorten the time it takes to get the outbreak under control.

If more people have had their AZ first dose 4 weeks or longer ago that provides options for those to bring forward their 2nd dose in an outbreak situation with a 2 week delay after the 2nd dose to get to optimal protection.
 
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HappyFlyerFamily

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Doubt VIC thinks that at all judging from past behaviour from Sutton, what we do know the VIC CHO is still hamstrung by the beloved ATAGI and is clearly working on a work around that doesn’t land them in a political / medical s-storm…
Perhaps accepting the NSW CHO's opinion that the Sydney outbreak is of national significance/national emergency to warrant vaccination without informed consent???
 

jakeseven7

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Perhaps accepting the NSW CHO's opinion that the Sydney outbreak is of national significance/national emergency to warrant vaccination without informed consent???

The VIC CHO clearly thought that before the NSW outbreak had begun… in the middle of the SA/VIC outbreak…. That’s when he and Dr Chant started the ‘CHO rebellion’ 😆
 

HappyFlyerFamily

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One-off incentives to wait a while if the Lieutenant-General has the final say - quote from ABC blog

L-G Frewen: "Right now, I have said incentives is something we will consider, but right now Australians, in the last 7 days, we have had 1.2 million doses going into people's arms. Demand is still exceeding supply right now so the time for incentives is maybe later when we're getting into some of the more hesitant sort of groups. So I am really encouraged by the rate of Australians getting vaccinated.

"We will look at all positive alternatives. There is cash, there is the ideas of lotteries, all these things are being discussed. What is resonating with people right now really is being able to get back to the sort of lifestyle we used to enjoy, international travel, not having to do quarantine, not having to go into lockdown, and those sort of things. Getting vaccinated is the right thing to do for individuals and for the nation."
 

lovetravellingoz

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By not removing the informed consent, I'm guessing Vic authorities think they can hold off Delta until Pfizer has had two-dosed.

Before the Vic and NSW CHO (and their Premiers) were on the one page about informed consent. Of course circumstances 'rapidly' deteriorated in NSW.


Remember that tweet is just the State Run Hubs.



Under 60's are still getting AZ in Vic.

I got my second dose of AZ yesterday and there were under 50's there getting vaccinated at the GP RC that I was at (it only does AZ).

But yes will be better if the GP requirement is removed, or at least say removed down to 40 years of age.
 
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mviy

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One-off incentives to wait a while if the Lieutenant-General has the final say - quote from ABC blog...

"We will look at all positive alternatives. There is cash, there is the ideas of lotteries, all these things are being discussed. What is resonating with people right now really is being able to get back to the sort of lifestyle we used to enjoy, international travel, not having to do quarantine, not having to go into lockdown, and those sort of things. Getting vaccinated is the right thing to do for individuals and for the nation."
It's likely that if there was a lottery anyone who had had the vaccine before a date would be eligible.
 

HappyFlyerFamily

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It's likely that if there was a lottery anyone who had had the vaccine before a date would be eligible.
My take-away was more the other part of the quote that you didn't quote. The Lieutenant General doesn't think incentives comes into play until supply is more than demand and when they are trying to persuade the hesitant to get the jab.
 

RAM

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I had no idea this was the case - it is bizarre - as a non-resident in the US I can book an appointment at pretty much any pharmac_ and have any one of the Pfizer, Moderna or Janssen vaccinations immediately. (Just checked it is 6:40 PM here and I can get vaccinated tonight!) It is not even age dependent.

All free of charge and no paperwork required.
All the fault of that Trump administration. Bah humbug! Who'd thought they should spread the bets across 5 or 6 different vaccines by June 2020?

Those no-hopers even signed up the nationwide drug store (pharmac_) chains by July 2020. How un-Ostralian! ;)
 

MooTime

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Qantas
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HQ is not safe at all & will have a low level of compliance.
Be fully vacd before departure, return with a PCR test home & away producing negative result, by day 4 or 5 ppl will be at shops & family/friends places, infection can occur upto 14days so covid will be brought in & spread.
Bond good idea though.

ankle bracelets, yep I'd be happy to use them, but the backlash from public, no you can't make me wear that, human rights, blah blah, wishful thinking.

Once ppl leave for whatever reason, how do they return, as been suggested, ahead of the ~30k already on DHS waitlist?

The 80% vac level will be hit IMO no problem, by years end? can only hope, every day of 200k vac's very valuable cos they'll dry up at some point.
the 80% is our pop 16+. PM stated this in original presser & has been asked since & confirmed it couple times.

I'm actually fascinated how the international travel will start up again, the rush for ppl to go see their family & leisure travelers. The demand, the airlines, the ticket price, the reward availability.
Return circumstances, what goes with those who are positive, how will they be traeted, referred to etc.
 

burmans

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My take-away was more the other part of the quote that you didn't quote. The Lieutenant General doesn't think incentives comes into play until supply is more than demand and when they are trying to persuade the hesitant to get the jab.
On the last, the PM rejected the Labour $300 suggestion because (to paraphrase) he didn't want to reward people who had done the wrong thing to date in not getting vaccinated. Surely (like Marketing - so Scotty should be well aware of the concept) the idea of incentives is exactly that - to get people to do things they wouldn't normally do.

I was a bit lukewarm on the $300 idea myself but for precisely the opposite reason to the PM's, i.e. to maximise it's value the people you really need to get over the line are the vaccine hesitant or resistant not people who were always going to do it. I get the argument that people don't like this on equity reasons but the quid pro quo is that it will help us open up, so we do all get some benefit. Read an article today suggesting even quite small incentives can lead to change in attitude (in fact weirdly it appears large incentives can be less effective according to the study they quoted).
 

bcworld

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Funny that the PM thought it was a great idea for people to be offered free beer in exchange for vaccination (despite the fact it was against TGA rules).
 

mviy

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Major milestone in yesterday's numbers released today. Now over 20% (20.24%) of 16+ population is fully vaccinated, so over 1/4 of the way to the 80% goal.

40.3% of 70-74 have had their 2nd dose. So every age group 70-74 and up is over half way to the 80% goal.

70% of 65-69 have had their 1st dose. So if everyone who has had their first dose has their second within the next 3 months every age group 65-69 and up should reach 70% fully vaccinated.

50-54 and 55-59 have more than 20% fully vaccinated. When today's numbers are released tomorrow 60-64 should join them. Currently only 60-64 of age groups 40-44 and up has not yet reached 20% fully vaccinated.

25-29 has reached 10% 2nd dose. So every age group 25-29 and up has at least 10% fully vaccinated.

When today's numbers are released tomorrow we should go past 80% of 70+ with first dose.

When today's numbers are released tomorrow we should go past 2/3 of 50+ with first dose (66.60% is so close).

TAS has 50.75% of 70+ fully vaccinated, the first state to achieve >50% fully vaccinated for 70+ (a territory ACT has already achieved this).

Edit: Oops meant to say above 80% of 70+ have first dose when today's numbers come out tomorrow, not fully vaccinated sadly.
 

lovetravellingoz

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Major milestone in yesterday's numbers released today. Now over 20% (20.24%) of 16+ population is fully vaccinated, so over 1/4 of the way to the 80% goal.

40.3% of 70-74 have had their 2nd dose. So every age group 70-74 and up is over half way to the 80% goal.

70% of 65-69 have had their 1st dose. So if everyone who has had their first dose has their second within the next 3 months every age group 65-69 and up should reach 70% fully vaccinated.

50-54 and 55-59 have more than 20% fully vaccinated. When today's numbers are released tomorrow 60-64 should join them. Currently only 60-64 of age groups 40-44 and up has not yet reached 20% fully vaccinated.

25-29 has reached 10% 2nd dose. So every age group 25-29 and up has at least 10% fully vaccinated.

When today's numbers are released tomorrow we should go past 80% of 70+ fully vaccinated.

When today's numbers are released tomorrow we should go past 2/3 of 50+ with first dose (66.60% is so close).

TAS has 50.75% of 70+ fully vaccinated, the first state to achieve >50% fully vaccinated for 70+ (a territory ACT has already achieved this).


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