The COVID-19 vaccine rollout in Australia has begun

burmans

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And you need several weeks to get fully vaccinated and get the full protection of the 2nd dose. So some of the benefit from vaccinating more people in NSW won’t be seen for several weeks.
A few weeks may seem pretty short in current circumstances!
 

mviy

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If boosters are needed there should be evidence from overseas to inform us as to when the ideal time is to take them depending on which vaccine was taken for the first two doses.

One dose does make a difference, but two is better.
 

jakeseven7

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If boosters are needed there should be evidence from overseas to inform us as to when the ideal time is to take them depending on which vaccine was taken for the first two doses.

One dose does make a difference, but two is better.

There is no ‘if’ they are needed. It’s a certainty. And it’s looking like Pfizer requires them sooner right now (good for their share price ;) )
 

mviy

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There is no ‘if’ they are needed. It’s a certainty. And it’s looking like Pfizer requires them sooner right now (good for their share price ;) )
Is their data to suggest large numbers ending up in ICU and dying that have been fully vaccinated?

Pfizer has a vested interest in selling boosters. If Pfizer requires boosters that's good for their share price so long as alternative vaccines don't become preferred if alternatives provide protection for a longer period of time.
 

drron

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There is no ‘if’ they are needed. It’s a certainty. And it’s looking like Pfizer requires them sooner right now (good for their share price ;) )
Not necessarily.All the data suggesting boosters are needed comes from levels of antibodies.But they are not the only defence mechanism the body has.Cellular immunity is also important. I posted a link on the general vaccine thread of an NIH study suggesting that that may last for years and boosters not neccessarily going to be needed soon with mRNA vaccines.I think Pfizer is singing it's own songbook.

There have been studies showing that people infected in the SARs epidemic still have cellular immunity and that it provides some cross immunity against covid.
Earlier this century 32 survivors of the 1918 flu pandemic were studied and virtually all still had cellular activity against the H1N1 virus responsible 90 years later.
 

mviy

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Boosters, if used, could end up being more about protecting the unvaccinated population. If a booster targeted at Delta provides better protection against catching the virus and passing it on that will protect those who are unwilling to get vaccinated or for rare medical reasons are unable to get vaccinated.
 

lovetravellingoz

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Not sure if this posted earlier, but in relation to the current outbreak in Greater Sydney 50,000 extra doses of Pfizer will now be allocated to NSW.

By Bridget Judd

50,000 additional doses of Pfizer to be sent to NSW

Roughly 50,000 additional Pfizer doses are set to land in Sydney this coming week, in response to New South Wales’ request for more Pfizer supplies.
The doses will not be taken from allocations already made to the other states and territories, after that request from NSW was flatly rejected yesterday.
Instead, the doses will come from a small federal contingency of Pfizer doses.
It is expected they will arrive in New South Wales by the end of next week, and will be distributed through state vaccine clinics.
Health Minister Brad Hazzard was asked about reports of additional doses bound for Sydney earlier today, and said he was unaware of the additional allocations, but would welcome the offer.
Reporting by Tom Lowrey, ABC News
 

lovetravellingoz

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Pushka

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More at:

I'd also like to see a focus on treatments for covid infections because they will rise once we begin to open up. Maybe that's happening but they don't want to announce it in case the panic merchants and media latch their own interpretation onto it.
 

lovetravellingoz

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I'd also like to see a focus on treatments for covid infections because they will rise once we begin to open up. Maybe that's happening but they don't want to announce it in case the panic merchants and media latch their own interpretation onto it.

I believe this is proceeding on many fronts, including what the hospitals are directly doing themselves. And that this is a continual process.
 

jb747

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Love the time scales though. 2023 isn't exactly around the corner. We seem to be accepting that what has been going on for the last 18 months has at least that long again to run. It certainly doesn't seem like something to get excited about.
 

mviy

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A woman in her late 30s with no known pre-existing health conditions has died from COVID-19 in NSW.

They need to continue to highlight that the risk of dying from the virus is much greater than the risk of dying from the vaccine.

The number of vaccines ordered could suggest a few boosters might be needed next year, I guess.

Pfizer, Moderna and Novavax. We'll be spoiled for choice. What isn't needed could be donated to other countries in the region.
Love the time scales though. 2023 isn't exactly around the corner. We seem to be accepting that what has been going on for the last 18 months has at least that long again to run. It certainly doesn't seem like something to get excited about.
If it's a choice between us having boosters and not needing to go back into extended lockdown and able to ease international travel restrictions; or more extended lockdowns and continued harsh international travel restrictions I know which option I'd pick.
 

HappyFlyerFamily

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A woman in her late 30s with no known pre-existing health conditions has died from COVID-19 in NSW.

They need to continue to highlight that the risk of dying from the virus is much greater than the risk of dying from the vaccine.

The number of vaccines ordered could suggest a few boosters might be needed next year, I guess.

Pfizer, Moderna and Novavax. We'll be spoiled for choice. What isn't needed could be donated to other countries in the region.

If it's a choice between us having boosters and not needing to go back into extended lockdown and able to ease international travel restrictions; or more extended lockdowns and continued harsh international travel restrictions I know which option I'd pick.
A death that couldn't be avoided (by the vaccination program) due to this under 40 cohort not being eligible for vaccination until quite recently (28 June?)
 

mviy

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Well whilst that death may have been unavoidable there will be avoidable deaths in the future if people don’t get vaccinated.

It’s nearly 3 weeks since my first vaccine dose and some had theirs nearly 4 weeks ago. There’s very few adults who have any excuse not to have had at least one dose by now.
 
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Love the time scales though. 2023 isn't exactly around the corner. We seem to be accepting that what has been going on for the last 18 months has at least that long again to run. It certainly doesn't seem like something to get excited about.
It’s not going to go away in a hurry that’s for sure, with so much of the developing world with no ability to vaccinate, new variants are going to pop up. However it shouldn’t be like the last 18 months. With a vaccinated population and boosters already ordered, we should be able to avoid the lockdowns and border closures. Overseas travel commencing for vaccinated people and home quarantine. Not perfect but better.
 

jb747

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It’s not going to go away in a hurry that’s for sure, with so much of the developing world with no ability to vaccinate, new variants are going to pop up. However it shouldn’t be like the last 18 months. With a vaccinated population and boosters already ordered, we should be able to avoid the lockdowns and border closures.
What vaccinated population would that be? I'm going to bet that it stagnates at 50-60%.
Overseas travel commencing for vaccinated people and home quarantine.
There won't be any economy of scale if any form of quarantine is required. That means that airlines won't be able to gear up, nor will the pricing be any less than astronomical.
 

jakeseven7

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What data are you looking at?

Look at the raw run rate. NSW and VIC are steeply accelerating and we are going sideways / even slightly backwards mainly thanks to our soon to be retiring CHO who put the fear of god into everyone that they would die if they had a vaccine….
 

mviy

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What vaccinated population would that be? I'm going to bet that it stagnates at 50-60%.
Well once it does stagnate they'll need to provide some incentives to try to motivate those who can't be bothered to get the jab but aren't opposed to getting it to consider it worthwhile to go and get the jab.
 
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