Predictions of when international flights may resume/bans lifted

justinbrett

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Going by the info in this article, it's way too much hassle and confusing for me to consider OS travel with the family for a while. It's the testing prior to a flight, and the higher risk of contracting Covid whilst OS, that I see as the biggest concerns.

We'll see many a story about stranded underinsured travellers who can't afford the additional accommodation/expenses or who were fired for not showing up to work.


I'm not put off by it, but I am going to plan to take my final PCR test before returning to Australia in a location I'd be prepared to stay another 14 days in.
 

OATEK

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Going by the info in this article, it's way too much hassle and confusing for me to consider OS travel with the family for a while. It's the testing prior to a flight, and the higher risk of contracting Covid whilst OS, that I see as the biggest concerns.

We'll see many a story about stranded underinsured travellers who can't afford the additional accommodation/expenses or who were fired for not showing up to work.


I'm not put off by it, but I am going to plan to take my final PCR test before returning to Australia in a location I'd be prepared to stay another 14 days in.
The reason we feel able to travel to the UK is that firstly, we will be covered by the Health agreement with UK, and secondly we will be sleeping at our married daughter's house. These give us a measure of reassurance that we will be ok if Covid delays our return. Otherwise, we would probably be waiting until later in 2022 to see how things pan out.
 

mviy

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I too have the ability to stay with family or friends if I get stuck in the UK when I visit.

If I was prepared to risk getting stuck if I was allowed to travel unvaccinated last year I’m certainly prepared to risk getting stuck over there fully vaccinated.
 

Happy Dude

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The reason we feel able to travel to the UK is that firstly, we will be covered by the Health agreement with UK, and secondly we will be sleeping at our married daughter's house. These give us a measure of reassurance that we will be ok if Covid delays our return. Otherwise, we would probably be waiting until later in 2022 to see how things pan out.

Doesn't that mean the non-sick occupants will have to find alternative accommodation?

I'm not put off by it, but I am going to plan to take my final PCR test before returning to Australia in a location I'd be prepared to stay another 14 days in.

It's not like you can enjoy the sights of that location. The inside of a hotel is just that. It's not really a risk those with families would be keen to take on.
 

mviy

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I’m more concerned about reintroduction of travel restrictions than catching COVID-19. 14 days in a hotel if that’s what’s required if someone else tests positive is nowhere as big a thing as a 4 week trip turning into 3+ months overseas.

Being able to stay with family or friends means that if restrictions are reintroduced the costs of the trip will be able to be managed.
 

Happy Dude

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Yes, it may. But they survived when one of them had it before, so are experienced.
So you're saying that isolation is not strictly required? Just trying to get a handle of how a positive case is treated.
 

MooTime

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Seems like bit of an added adventure with testing & chance of being stuck even briefly in another location.

Little exciting I must say, yes little extra costs with PCR test here & there & everywhere, but another dimension to flying O/S.

Not for everyone obviously.
 
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So you're saying that isolation is not strictly required? Just trying to get a handle of how a positive case is treated.

In the UK, close contacts are not required to self-isolate unless specifically instructed to ( When to self-isolate and what to do - Coronavirus (COVID-19) ).

One thing that needs to be noted is that if you are infected with Covid and recover in that 14-day period, you still may test positive for quite a while (potentially several weeks), due to viral fragments remaining in your body. For the purposes of self-isolation, most local health departments have a process where you can be medically cleared - certifying that you have recovered and aren't infectious - to release you from self-isolation. But for travel purposes will this suffice? I can't see any official info for Australian entry purposes about a medical clearance being valid in place of a negative PCR test.
 

HappyFlyerFamily

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In the UK, close contacts are not required to self-isolate unless specifically instructed to ( When to self-isolate and what to do - Coronavirus (COVID-19) ).

One thing that needs to be noted is that if you are infected with Covid and recover in that 14-day period, you still may test positive for quite a while (potentially several weeks), due to viral fragments remaining in your body. For the purposes of self-isolation, most local health departments have a process where you can be medically cleared - certifying that you have recovered and aren't infectious - to release you from self-isolation. But for travel purposes will this suffice? I can't see any official info for Australian entry purposes about a medical clearance being valid in place of a negative PCR test.
Am I correct in recalling that some Australian Open tennis players got last second clearance to travel to Australia last year after testing positive because of viral fragments from a prior recovered infection?? But tennis probably is a special circumstance.
 

justinbrett

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Doesn't that mean the non-sick occupants will have to find alternative accommodation?



It's not like you can enjoy the sights of that location. The inside of a hotel is just that. It's not really a risk those with families would be keen to take on.

I was talking about geographic location, in a hotel regardless

In the US you don't have to isolate 10 days after symptoms or positive test.

But you can't get medical clearance to fly to Australia until 14 days, and then there could be delays in getting it through the airline etc. So you'll probably have at least a week in that location where you're free to do as you please but can't fly to Australia.

You also don't want to be in a city where you're paying $500 a night.
 

justinbrett

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In the UK, close contacts are not required to self-isolate unless specifically instructed to ( When to self-isolate and what to do - Coronavirus (COVID-19) ).

One thing that needs to be noted is that if you are infected with Covid and recover in that 14-day period, you still may test positive for quite a while (potentially several weeks), due to viral fragments remaining in your body. For the purposes of self-isolation, most local health departments have a process where you can be medically cleared - certifying that you have recovered and aren't infectious - to release you from self-isolation. But for travel purposes will this suffice? I can't see any official info for Australian entry purposes about a medical clearance being valid in place of a negative PCR test.

What if my COVID-19 PCR test result is positive, but I have already had COVID-19 and recovered from it? What should I do?​

If you have had COVID-19 before and your COVID-19 PCR test result continues to be positive, you will only be allowed to travel if you give:

  • your positive COVID-19 PCR test result (taken in the past 72 hours) AND
  • a medical certificate from your doctor. This must be issued no earlier than four weeks before your flight.
Your medical certificate must clearly state that:

  • at least 14 days have passed since the onset of symptoms or initial positive PCR if asymptomatic; and
  • there has been clinical resolution of fever and respiratory symptoms of the acute illness for the previous 72 hours; and
  • you have had COVID-19 before but are now recovered and not considered to be infectious.
If your COVID-19 test result is positive and you do not have a medical certificate that states the above information, you and any primary close contacts in your travelling group, should not go to the airport as you will be prevented from boarding.
 

jakeseven7

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Going by the info in this article, it's way too much hassle and confusing for me to consider OS travel with the family for a while. It's the testing prior to a flight, and the higher risk of contracting Covid whilst OS, that I see as the biggest concerns.

I think many people will feel the same and I think the tourism and business travel recovery will be somwhat muted until testing on departure / arrival is removed.

I suspect the testing requirement will evaporate pretty quickly as a result and will just be about vaccination.

Perhaps a better policy would be for the unvaccinated have to be tested only.
 
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PineappleSkip

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You are 100% on the money @Happy Dude. There is too much angst in navigating all the requirements, the incompatibilities, and the constant threat of change, it takes all the fun out of travel. Done it for work, not doing it for fun for a while.

cheers skip
 
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There have been discussions and I'm hopeful that there will be "Vaccinated Travel Lane" flights that will be vaccinated travellers only from Australia to SIN, that might allow us to travel back to Singapore without having to do 7 days home quarantine, and allow Australians to visit Singapore as well. But that won't happen until the Australian government reciprocates and allows non-Australian Singapore residents to visit Australia.

If this happens SQ will have some flights that have a vaccine mandate and some that don't, like they do with flights to LHR, US etc. But not necessarily inbound to Australia unless .gov.au requires it.
Yes Have been watching SIN as hope/d a short trip there but nothing doing at the moment.
 

jrfsp

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"Morocco has banned flights to and from the UK due to the coronavirus pandemic.
Several UK airlines and holiday companies have been told by the Moroccan government that flights will be suspended from 23:59 BST on Wednesday until further notice.
Flights between Morocco and Germany and the Netherlands have also been suspended."

No wonder people are booking last minute. I nearly booked a trip to Europe for mid next year but chickened out as still very changeable. If airlines were better at refunds i might do it but after the hassles of last years refunds i'm being a lot more cautious.

There are still airlines id be nervous booking (Even CX) due to potential insolvency, i see Garuda may be the next to go.
 
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