Predictions of when international flights may resume/bans lifted

MooTime

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The point - why are we waiting for a set figure of the whole population to be vaccinated when realistically it’s only certain groups who are greatly at risk?
So what's your view on the much higher takeup of hospital ED wards & ICU wards, all the nurses, Dr's. etc etc needed in assistance for the large upatke in Covid patients in hospitals?

Other people's normal medical ailments may be put on the backburner, delayed. Which in turn will cause other major issues.

There'd be decent strain on the health system.

Also need to vaccinate all age groups as all ages can still catch & pass on covid to older cohorts even though vaccinated. Of course you know this.
 

jjonnboy

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Maybe go back and read what I’ve said
Once is enough, I'm pleased you've now qualified your previous incorrect assertions which did nothing to serve your argument, parts of which I actually agree with.
 

N860CR

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So what's your view on the much higher takeup of hospital ED wards & ICU wards, all the nurses, Dr's. etc etc needed in assistance for the large upatke in Covid patients in hospitals?

Other people's normal medical ailments may be put on the backburner, delayed. Which in turn will cause other major issues.

I know plenty of nurses who have been stood down or had hours reduced over the last 18 months because our hospitals are empty. “Normal medical ailments” have been on the back burner since the start of the pandemic and we’re still playing catch up. Head to Balmain hospital if you’re keen and inspect the covid ward that has seen a total of two patients over the last year.

Also need to vaccinate all age groups as all ages can still catch & pass on covid to older cohorts even though vaccinated. Of course you know this

So we need to vaccinate all age groups so the younger group can’t pass the virus onto the older ones who are already fully vaccinated? Not sure about the logic there.
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Once is enough, I'm pleased you've now qualified your previous incorrect assertions which did nothing to serve your argument, parts of which I actually agree with.

And if you’d bothered to read them other than grab single words out of context, you’d know it’s the same correct position I’ve held for the last year.
 

mviy

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Home quarantine for fully vaccinated travellers would put minimal strain on the health system. If you are fully vaccinated you are highly unlikely to have COVID and even if you do if you are stuck at home you won't be passing it on to others outside your home.

We're not looking for fully opening up today, but a sensible middle ground that allows people to attend important once in a lifetime events like an immediate family member's wedding etc., let's people get to see dying relatives, let's people that need to travel for their business do so on a larger scale than presently etc. Someone who needs to see a dying relative, but then come home quickly to keep their job is in an impossible position at the moment as they are not going to be able to get back quickly with the caps as low as they presently are. Home quarantine solves that for those that are vaccinated and helps to free up hotel quarantine places for those stuck overseas who are not vaccinated or whose vaccination status cannot be verified.

The decisions seem to be made considering the risk to COVID of physical health and ignoring mental health and the long term economic impacts. I'm not in this position, but people who have built up businesses for decades are facing losing the lot and starting again when they should be planning for retirement. Locking down an entire state and throwing a few million at mental health is like having an ad promoting gambling and including the comment "gamble responsibly" at the end.
 
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jjonnboy

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And if you’d bothered to read them other than grab single words out of context, you’d know it’s the same correct position I’ve held for the last year.
Ummm. I was quoting sentences that you wrote, which were wrong. The quality and accuracy of information for me is important; seemingly not for you. Anyhow don't let facts stand in the way of your "correct" position.
Thank you, yes. One too many zeros. But the fact that we're at such tiny percentages somewhat proves the point.
QED
 
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pagingjoan

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I'm 1B and have been fully vaccinated for almost a month - AZ.
As another data point, I am 1B, and took action to be vaccinated at the first opportunity, but had some (medical) hurdles to clear before that could happen. My AZ2 appointment is still three weeks away, and that is without waiting for the full twelve week gap.

My partner, similarly, has one more week to go before his second shot.

I am sure we are not alone in this position.
 

JB expat

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I'm 1b,work in health but only 6 days since second AZ dose.Other things do complicate timing.So still quite a few 1b waiting for dose 2 of AZ.
Understood - Hopefully everyone who had the first with no reaction will move forward with getting the 2nd.
 
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roogirl

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I don’t know - I know loads of people who have got delta variant who are double vaccinated (U.K.). None of them are sick beyond a sniffle, none would have been picked up as cases of they weren’t testing for other reasons eg kids at school. But that’s actually problematic if your vaxx rate isn’t high.

I am not a lockdown lover and also think australia should get off it’s lazy butt cheeks and provide a safe scaleable way of allowing its citizens to enter and leave freely, but I am not altogether sure in an unvaxxed population there really *is* a middle ground right now.
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Its not it’s! Jeepers, this pandemic is clearly getting to me.
 

jakeseven7

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Doesn't matter what anybody says atm, we won't be opening up in any degree anytime soon, home Q, nothing until at least everybody that wants to be vaccinated has had the chance. And we know that is some many months off for a juggler of reasons.

Safe to say the next 6 months to years end will be much the same,
* just watching the 1D & 2D number slowly climb
* incentives at some point from public & private companies.
* A target of sorts ann within couple months as Frewen has stated.
* HQ will be piloted, trial on a small scale, nothing to get excited about.
* More knob celebrities will gain entry while genuine aussies struggle to return.
No point going beyond phase 2 atm.

Phase 1: vaccinate, prepare and pilot​

We are in Phase 1 now, and the aim is to continue to minimise community transmission.

Lockdowns may continue to be used in this phase, although only as a last resort.

The international arrivals cap will now be reduced by 50% to take pressure off our hotel quarantine system due to the increased infectiousness of the Delta variant.
Morrison has indicated he expects the cap to stay in place until at least the beginning of 2022.

Phase 2: post-vaccination​

In this phase, the international arrival cap will be restored to current levels for unvaccinated passengers, and a larger cap applied to fully vaccinated passengers.

Lockdowns would rarely be needed, and fully vaccinated people would have eased restrictions in any outbreak with respect to lockdowns or border closures. More students and economic visitors will also be allowed in.

Although no dates or vaccine rollout targets have been set, for us to reach Phase 2, we would clearly need a high percentage of our population to be fully vaccinated.

As it will take at least until the end of year for the whole adult population to have received their first dose, Phase 2 is likely to kick in some time in the first half of 2022.

Oh thanks for reposting my nephews year 5 homework on phases 😂
 

dajop

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Singapore back into lockdown (closed dining, indoor venues, gyms) with 46% fully vaccinated:

Not called lockdown here! Just "heightened restrictions". The "gahmen" (government) more or less controls the media, so you never really hear the "L" word. Probably a good thing too, with restrictions ramping up, the last thing everyone needs is the media making the mental health of everyone worse by over-dramatising everything as they always tend to do in Australia.
 

sjk

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Not called lockdown here! Just "heightened restrictions". The "gahmen" (government) more or less controls the media, so you never really hear the "L" word. Probably a good thing too, with restrictions ramping up, the last thing everyone needs is the media making the mental health of everyone worse by over-dramatising everything as they always tend to do in Australia.
Today has been a bad mental health day in .sg
 

hb13

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I think most here will agree vaccines are the way out. However, therein lies the problem. The rate of vaccination is simply unacceptable. The current rate of vaccination in Australia, I think is currently the highest it has been, and yet it is nowhere near the high rates most of Europe and the UK have had on a per capita basis.

The government needs to throw the kitchen sink at this and increase that rate. Or else, the pain is only going to last longer.

Getting as many people vaccinated, as quickly as physically possible needs to be the highest of priorities right now and everything needs to be done to get the rate high enough to get this done in 2021.
 

oznflfan

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I think most here will agree vaccines are the way out. However, therein lies the problem. The rate of vaccination is simply unacceptable. The current rate of vaccination in Australia, I think is currently the highest it has been, and yet it is nowhere near the high rates most of Europe and the UK have had on a per capita basis.

The government needs to throw the kitchen sink at this and increase that rate. Or else, the pain is only going to last longer.

Getting as many people vaccinated, as quickly as physically possible needs to be the highest of priorities right now and everything needs to be done to get the rate high enough to get this done in 2021.
Thing is there is so much apathy out there for the younger half of the population, I figure you are looking at:

1/3 Either vaccinated or wanting to be vaccinated but can't (I am all Pfizer'd up however)
1/3 Pure apathy - can't be bothered, will do if pushed/affects me enough
1/3 Actively don't want it.

So many people I speak to are in the bottom two, however I live remote and not in capital cities that have been locked down several times so same old same old for most here.

Been saying for a while, need some form of big stick to get numbers up. Government keeps saying Australia is a high vaccination country (babies vaccinated, etc), but for COVID we are not.
 

dajop

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. The rate of vaccination is simply unacceptable.

Isn’t it a bit early to draw that conclusion?

Of course, at the moment, the vaccination rates are unacceptable, but isn’t the problem right now one of supply (of the darling-vaccine) ? Only once the supply of Pfizer ramps up will iit be possible to judge true vaccine hesitancy and a likely eventual rate?

Basically the inconsistent messaging and the very successful scare campaign run by the media on AZ, has taken that option off the table for many, so it’s unrealistic to expect vaccination rates to date to be anything other than where they’re at.

We’ve all read the passionate advocacy against AZ and for mRNA vaccines by one particular AFF member. That view is almost certainly the prevailing view in the community - irrespective of what arguments may be thrown up for AZ by people who look beyond the headlines. My 80 yo aunt is waiting for Pfizer, and there’s just no arguing with her. A friend of mine has a father in the late 80s who is already on Oxygen for 8hrs a day is also waiting for Pfizer …. ludicrous. But whilst 7, 9 and 10 lead with the stories they do there is no convincing people otherwise

I wouldn’t be surprised, once Pfizer is on tap, that demand from the younger generation skyrockets - as long as there is a potential path out of ongoing lockdowns.
 
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jakeseven7

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Today has been a bad mental health day in .sg

This video of people travelling overseas will cheer you up! Produced by the QLD government :)

 

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