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Grammar Discussions

Pushka

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A pet hate of mine is when Americans (or anyone, but they often seem to be the culprits) spell it QUANTAS...
I remember an Amazing Race series that started with people having to find a flag that spelt the name of Australia's main carrier. Americans looked for ages for the U.
 

robd

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My pet hate is "My bad".
I actually like "my bad". It covers a multitude of errors. I find it much easier just to say "my bad", meaning I accept responsibility, I stuffed up or I misunderstood. I would much rather hear that than a myriad of excuses.
 

anat0l

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How about "Opps! My bad!"?
The way that people are saying it these days, it probably sounds like that, even if "oops" is in the dictionary and "opps" is not.

With typing these days, don't forget that the young 'hacker' vernacular has also given us "pwned".
 

Warks

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There are a lot of things I see nowadays which I was putting down to typos but I think they are actually mistakes made by people who obviously don't read much apart from internet forum discussions. This is because they write the sound of the word, not the word.

"It's better then I thought".

"You're just bias". (or probably "your just bias") "Don't be prejudice".

"Is a good thing I got here in time" (instead of it's) - I think this is what native Spanish speakers write.


There's a lot of other stuff which is used 'ironically' (and I mean that in the American non-ironic sense) by the kids. They like to say things that sound like video game instructions in Chinglish or like cats appear to 'talk' in memes. "I can haz cheezeburger" and the like.

"All your base are belong to us." (Google that one)

"That guy is full of win!"

"You are fail".

This stuff is all good fun for those that know the rules but you always wonder if some of the kids think it's correct as they hear it all the time.
 

medhead

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Not written grammar. But Specific/aly and Pacific/aly

Along similar lines I worked with someone who always said supposably, which I thought should be supposedly. Appreciate thoughts on that one.

I think "just saying" is an important modern concept. I use it often in the situation where I understand the other person, and mostly likely agree with them, but there is a need to correct something they've written. So no intention to insult or confront them, but maybe to strengthen their position. I'd love suggestions for a more formal way of expressing that idea.

Rolled gold is actually a well known (old) pop culture reference to the 'sale of the century' quiz show.

Edit: Another example of just saying usage: #2313 Where I don't expect someone do change what they are doing because of my view.
 
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Warks

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Like 'abit'.


Another one with a lost 'd' is 'used' in the sense of "used to".

"I use to do that." I think the 't' in 'to' substitutes for the 'd' when people say it so they think that's how it's spelled/spelt.

Again I think we are only seeing this through people who don't read very much typing on the interwebs who hear it as "use to" and think that's what it is.
 

Hydevanity

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Like 'abit'.


Another one with a lost 'd' is 'used' in the sense of "used to".

"I use to do that." I think the 't' in 'to' substitutes for the 'd' when people say it so they think that's how it's spelled/spelt.

Again I think we are only seeing this through people who don't read very much typing on the interwebs who hear it as "use to" and think that's what it is.
I had a slight panic attack, thought I might have been one of those people... This thread makes me anxious :shock:.
 

SeatBackForward

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I had a slight panic attack, thought I might have been one of those people... This thread makes me anxious :shock:.
No need to panic.

I think of Grammar as being a bit like clothes. Most of the time you can wear t-shirts and jeans, be comfortable, be yourself and most people will still know who you are. But, sometimes you need to impress or be a bit more formal and that's when you dress up.

Similarly, most of the time I'm also quite casual when it comes to grammar, but know that to have a good impact or writing something important, then my own game needs to be lifted.

I do however, consider SMS speak as being in your old, stained, holey clothes not caring what the world thinks (which can also be what you need to do sometimes).
 
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froggerADL

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I have noticed that people are making statements and then putting a ? at the end which they think is the way you ask a question. I dislike this intently.
 

Pushka

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I have noticed that people are making statements and then putting a ? at the end which they think is the way you ask a question. I dislike this intently.
That's like sports commentators on television who make a statement to a player or coach and then they shove the microphone into their faces waiting for them to respond to the statement as if it was actually a question.
 

JohnK

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That's like sports commentators on television who make a statement to a player or coach and then they shove the microphone into their faces waiting for them to respond to the statement as if it was actually a question.
Not really.

Sports commentator to losing captain "Your team was awful tonight!". A factual statement waiting for a response. No need to ask a question.
 

Pushka

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Not really.

Sports commentator to losing captain "Your team was awful tonight!". A factual statement waiting for a response. No need to ask a question.
An interviewer asks questions. That's their purpose. Otherwise they are just giving their own opinions. Maybe I need to change the wording from Commentator to Interviewer - the difference being that I was referring to the guys and gals who grab the player during/after the match.
 

craven morehead

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Re: The totally off-topic thread

"Should have" is indeed correct; "should of", I believe, evolved as an unwitting contraction of the correct pair of words, which is then incorrectly transcribed.

"Should've", according to my sources, is actually a contraction that at worst does not properly exist or at best is not acceptable in semi-formal or more formal usage. "Should have" is spelled out but in speech is often corrupted and contracted. A similar error, of which I find myself often doing and needing to eradicate, is "would have" (not "would've").

Been doing a favour for a friend in reviewing her application letters and selection criteria statements. She has a bit of an issue using commas (usually not enough); I think practice has me taking this for granted as I don't know where to start to cogently explain where one should use commmas.
commmas ? :confused:
 

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