Australian Reports of the Virus Spread

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The thing is no one (even on this thread) was saying bring back healthcare workers from planned leave - not Day 1, not Day 15 even. None of the modelling shows healthcare resources compromised. Everyone seems to take for granted that there will be a baseline healthcare capacity and ability to increase (by taking over private hospitals and pausing certain surgeries).
Tasmanian doctors working in the public system were warned back in November that they should not plan to have leave in January or February and that any leave that had already been organised may be cancelled at the last moment.
 

drron

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Q: on today’s death, is it highly unusual but within guidelines for the State to record as covid death (WHO or AusGov standard??) when not on death certificate?
No that is what has been done throughout the pandemic. This is the problem when comparing covid deaths to flu deaths. Someone with multiple co morbidities who dies during a flu epidemic was very likely to have the death assigned to one of their other illnesses rather than have flu mentioned on the death cerificate.
The other problem though is that if a person has many other illnesses and tests positive to covid and dies it certainly can still be that they did die of covid and not with.
 

HappyFlyerFamily

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One other thought I'd leave in this thread. There has been a lot of talk about living with COVID. There's an implicit assumption in that argument, that we should spare the elderly and vulnerable in the community just to say we've opened everything up. That's fundamentally wrong. Yes, we may no longer have the luxury of keeping COVID out of our communities but we can take measures to deal with it for those who are vulnerable in our communities. Why on god's green earth aren't we providing N95 respirators, rapid antigen tests, etc. for those vulnerable in our community? If you're in a nursing home and have people over to visit, meet them outside where we know COVID is less likely to spread than indoors. Of course we can also improve ventilation in retirement homes which would have the added benefit of removing airborne viruses that do a number on seniors (e.g., flu, pneumonia). Why aren't the airlines providing socially distant seating in their cabin (when available) for those vulnerable? Why aren't the vulnerable in our community not being given COVID-19 treatments the moment they test positive which we know greatly reduces hospitalization and death versus giving it out when they're in the hospital.

Again, there is a lot our governments can do to really deal with COVID now. There is absolutely no reason why we should be seeing the hospitalization and death numbers in NSW or elsewhere as high as they are.

-RooFlyer88


And what is the cost to Medicare for having all those patients in the hospital and ICU? What is the cost to having grocery store workers and truckers have to isolate for a week? What is the cost to the Sydney economy of having public transport running at a reduced schedule thanks to Transport for NSW drivers having to isolate? What is the cost to society of having teachers and kids isolate due to a COVID outbreak at school? Much of these risks can now be reduced greatly by providing the vulnerable and critical workers with a box of P2 respirators you can get for $25 at a Bunnings which I suspect the Commonwealth can get for substantially less. The United States is making 400 million N95 respirators available to the public at pharmacies for free and are offering free COVID tests by mail. Meanwhile, I'm lucky if I can find a Rapid Antigen Test for under $100.

-RooFlyer88

This is a refreshing view. I thought most of the posters on this thread were of the let it rip variety.

But as has been said many times, adverse health issues also hit the bottom line of many businesses.

Moved the discussion here, where it seems more appropriate.

You first talk about the vulnerable, with a focus on elderly. Many of whom have other health issues. I think its pretty clear that for example NSW leaders don't give much focus on the deaths of older Australians, less so if they are in aged care (partly a Federal responsibility).

Now you want to move the goal posts to hospital and ICU and close contacts working in non-exempt industries.

The leadership has spoken what they care about - get exempt/critical industries back to work ($), keep stocking shelves ($) and the peak of hospitalisation and ICU will be reached eventually. (just ride out the storm). Honestly not many people care about the cost to Medicare (backed by some contribution from private health funds) - its a public good and Federal Government guaranteed - if for some reason the funds are depleted the Federal Government will find funds somewhere and appropriate.

In much of Australia, they have changed the close contact rules - 4 hours indoors without a mask. Its going to be hard to be a close contact outside of family. If there is a teacher shortage, you will be certain they will make them critical and exempt too.
 
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Pushka

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Moved the discussion here, where it seems more appropriate.

You first talk about the vulnerable, with a focus on elderly. Many of whom have other health issues. I think its pretty clear that for example NSW leaders don't give much focus on the deaths of older Australians, less so if they are in aged care (partly a Federal responsibility).

Now you want to move the goal posts to hospital and ICU and close contacts working in non-exempt industries.

The leadership has spoken what they care about - get exempt/critical industries back to work ($), keep stocking shelves ($) and the peak of hospitalisation and ICU will be reached eventually. (just ride out the storm). Honestly not many people care about the cost to Medicare (backed by some contribution from private health funds) - its a public good and Federal Government guaranteed - if for some reason the funds are depleted the Federal Government will find funds somewhere and appropriate.

In much of Australia, they have changed the close contact rules - 4 hours indoors without a mask. Its going to be hard to be a close contact outside of family. If there is a teacher shortage, you will be certain they will make them critical and exempt too.
At least in SA they have changed their stupid 15 minute close contact rule for schools and childcare. Now, a positive in the class just means children have to be monitored for symptoms but can keep going to school and childcare. Childcare workers are to be RAT tested three times a week.
 

DC3

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At least in SA they have changed their stupid 15 minute close contact rule for schools and childcare. Now, a positive in the class just means children have to be monitored for symptoms but can keep going to school and childcare. Childcare workers are to be RAT tested three times a week.
But I had understood that the 15 minute household-only rule was another part of the Gold Standard. 🤷‍♂️
 

HappyFlyerFamily

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But I had understood that the 15 minute household-only rule was another part of the Gold Standard. 🤷‍♂️
The SA rule was really a 15 minute dining rule. One would take off a mask for 15 minutes while eating. If your contact (subsequently became positive) ate with you - bang, close contact. I don't think it was really meant for neighbouring tables, but it could be.

Edit to add: For information the SA rule was 15 minutes + no mask + within 1.5 metres "close physical proximity" + indoor.

The Aussie Test captain got caught by this rule because he took a selfie, had a chat and was the next table I believe.
 
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Pushka

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The SA rule was really a 15 minute dining rule. One would take off a mask for 15 minutes while eating. If your contact (subsequently became positive) ate with you - bang, close contact. I don't think it was really meant for neighbouring tables, but it could be.

Edit to add: For information the SA rule was 15 minutes + no mask + within 1.5 metres "close physical proximity" + indoor.

The Aussie Test captain got caught by this rule because he took a selfie and was the next table I believe
See, it is just getting too hard for people. I didn't go to the market yesterday to have coffee with family because we would have been there for an hour, and no one can guarantee that people won't test positive. I needed to know it would be safe for me to babysit grandson next week. If it was four hours - no problems. It's this 15 minute thing and 25% capacity that is the issue in SA.
 

HappyFlyerFamily

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See, it is just getting too hard for people. I didn't go to the market yesterday to have coffee with family because we would have been there for an hour, and no one can guarantee that people won't test positive. I needed to know it would be safe for me to babysit grandson next week. If it was four hours - no problems. It's this 15 minute thing and 25% capacity that is the issue in SA.
Did the market / cafe have an outdoor section? That's a legitimate loophole. But I accept your view of the risk of the 15-min rule potentially applying when one has near-future responsibilities one wants to fulfil.
 

Pushka

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Did the market / cafe have an outdoor section? That's a legitimate loophole. But I accept your view of the risk of the 15-min rule potentially applying when one has near-future responsibilities one wants to fulfil.
Not really. It’s in the central plaza. The outdoor area is where smokers gather and it’s literally where vegetable trucks unload and on the street. If either of them test positive and it’s a possibility as they mind their grandkids who are going to holiday sports programs etc then I get caught in the drag net for a 45 minute catch up coffee. And I know they’d tell me. Not worth it.
 

HappyFlyerFamily

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NSW (244,724 active – 21,000 public hospital beds, 884 public/private ICU beds)
[previous peak hospital/ICU: 1268/242 - September 2021]
Certain elective surgery suspended/paused - announced 7/1

15/1 27,020 PCR+, 82k tests, 21,748 RAT+, 2576 hospital, 193 ICU
16/1 20,978 PCR+, 122k tests, 13,682 RAT+, 2650 hospital, 191 ICU
17/1 17,646 PCR+, 85k tests, 11,858 RAT+, 2776 hospital, 203 ICU
18/1 16,067 PCR+, 67k tests, 13,763 RAT+, 2850 hospital, 209 ICU
19/1 19,847 PCR+, 84k tests, 12,450 RAT+, 2863 hospital, 217 ICU
20/1 17,647 PCR+, 73k tests, 13,178 RAT+, 2781 hospital, 212 ICU
21/1 15,153 PCR+, 88k tests, 10,015 RAT+, 2743 hospital, 209 ICU
22/1 11,582 PCR+, 56k tests, 8566 RAT+, 2762 hospital, 204 ICU

Victoria (217,505 active – 15,000 public hospital beds, 476 public/private ICU beds)
[previous peak hospital/ICU: 851/163 - October 2021]
Certain elective surgery suspended/paused - announced 6/1

15/1 12,669 PCR+, 59k tests, 60% of 12,857 RAT+, 1054 hospital, 115 ICU
16/1 17,791 PCR+, 59k tests, 60% of 10,337 RAT+, 1114 hospital, 122 ICU
17/1 12,059 PCR+, 89k tests, 63% of 10,370 RAT+, 1229 hospital, 129 ICU
18/1 8433 PCR+, 39k tests, 62% of 11,747 RAT+, 1152 hospital, 127 ICU
19/1 10,725 PCR+, 49k tests, 62% of 10,043 RAT+, 1173 hospital, 125 ICU
20/1 11,693 PCR+, 51k tests, 63% of 10,273 RAT+, 1206 hospital, 122 ICU
21/1 10,023 PCR+, 43k tests, 62% of 8144 RAT+, 1096 hospital, 121 ICU
22/1 8432 PCR+, 39k tests, % of 7584 RAT+, 1029 hospital, 120 ICU

Qld (84,807 active – 13,000 public hospital beds, 408 public/private ICU beds)
Certain elective surgery suspended/paused - announced 8/1

15/1 13,622 PCR+, 42k tests, 6087 RAT+, 649 hospital, 46 ICU
16/1 12,830 PCR+, 42k tests, 4615 RAT+, 670 hospital, 49 ICU
17/1 10,547 PCR+, 30k tests, 4575 RAT+, 702 hospital, 47 ICU
18/1 9978 PCR+, 32k tests, 5984 RAT+, 819 hospital, 50 ICU
19/1 13,992 PCR+, 41k tests, 5940 RAT+, 835 hospital, 52 ICU
20/1 16812 positives, 37k tests, 850 hospital, 48 ICU *no RAT+ provided
21/1 11,222 PCR+, 37k tests, 4809 RAT+, 855 hospital, 54 ICU
22/1 10,696 PCR+, 36k tests, 4354 RAT+, 884 hospital, 52 ICU

SA (31,582 21/1 active – 4500 public hospital beds, 161 public/private ICU beds)
Certain elective surgery suspended/paused - announced 28/12

15/1 3107 PCR+, 18k tests, 1242 RAT+, 236 hospital, 26 ICU
16/1 3450 positives, 17k tests, 220 hospital, 26 ICU
17/1 3829 positives, 14k tests, 227 hospital, 26 ICU
18/1 3079 positives, 13k tests, 285 hospital, 24 ICU
19/1 3482 positives, 15k tests, 294 hospital, 23 ICU
20/1 3777 positives, 15k tests, 290 hospital, 29 ICU
21/1 3023 positives, 14k tests, 298 hospital, 33 ICU
22/1 2193 positives, 275 hospital, 37 ICU

Tasmania (5746 active – 1500 public hospital beds, 38 public/private ICU beds)

15/1 255 PCR+, 2.1k tests, 884 RAT+, 10/22 hospital, 1 ICU
16/1 245 PCR+, 1.9k tests, 580 RAT+, 8/22 hospital, 1 ICU
17/1 310 PCR+, 2.0k tests, 727 RAT+, 7/21 hospital, 1 ICU
18/1 360 PCR+, 2.2k tests, 950 RAT+, 12/25 hospital, 2 ICU
19/1 471 PCR+, 2.6k tests, 714 RAT+, 12/29 hospital, 2 ICU
20/1 293 PCR+, 1.6k tests, 634 RAT+, 14/31 hospital, 3 ICU
21/1 311 PCR+, 1.7k tests, 555 RAT+, 13/31 hospital, 3 ICU
22/1 251 PCR+, 1.6k tests, 475 RAT+, 11/31 hospital, 2 ICU

ACT (5647 active 21/1 – 1200 public hospital beds, 37 public/private ICU beds)
Certain elective surgery suspended/paused at 1 hospital - announced 7/1

15/1 629 PCR+, 691 RAT+, 30 hospital, 3 ICU
16/1 716 PCR+, 600 RAT+, 41 hospital, 3 ICU
17/1 878 PCR+, 723 RAT+, 52 hospital, 4 ICU
18/1 976 PCR+, 884 RAT+, 63 hospital, 6 ICU
19/1 654 PCR+, 813 RAT+, 60 hospital, 5 ICU
20/1 254 PCR+, 638 RAT+, 62 hospital, 3 ICU
21/1 259 PCR+, 567 RAT+, 62 hospital, 2 ICU
22/1

NT (3570 active 21/1 – 1000 public hospital beds, 20 public/private ICU beds)

15/1 412 positives, 2.2k tests, 32 hospital, 0 ICU
16/1 327 positives, 1.7k tests, 44 hospital, 0 ICU
17/1 284 positives, 1.3k tests, 39 hospital, 1 ICU
18/1 625 positives, 1.4k tests, 43 hospital, 1 ICU
19/1 418 positives, 1.6k tests, 48 hospital, 0 ICU
20/1 459 positives, 1.1k tests, 54 hospital, 1 ICU
21/1 432 positives, 62 hospital, 2 critical condition (ICU?)
22/1

WA (82 active 21/1 – 5900 public hospital beds, 179 public/private ICU bed)

15/1 2 local positive, 1.6k tests
16/1 2 local positives, 1.3k tests
17/1 3 local positives, 3.7k tests, 1 hospital
18/1 2 local positives, 8.4k tests, 1 hospital
19/1 2 local positives, 5.9k tests, 0 hospital
20/1 5 local positives – 1 unlinked, 4.9k tests
21/1 7 local positives – 4 unlinked (3 same household), 4.2k tests
22/1
 

HappyFlyerFamily

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from ABC blog

Victorians whose PCR results were discarded could miss out on financial support​

The nearly 100,000 Victorians who had their COVID-19 swabs thrown out due to delays in the PCR testing system could miss out on financial support from the government.

More than 90,000 PCR tests were ditched last week because they were considered no longer valid. Authorities confirmed today that a further 1,700 processed through Alfred Health were discarded later in the week.

People were told to instead take a RAT and isolate for seven days if they had symptoms.

At the time, COVID-19 response commander Jeroen Weimar said the government supported the pathology labs’ decision because the week-old swabs would have given “increasingly meaningless” results.

A spokesperson for the National Recovery and Resilience Agency said people would be eligible for financial support with either a PCR test or a RAT, provided they met the other criteria.

Rapid tests have been hard to come by during the Omicron surge, with supply constraints and price gouging creating barriers to access.

The vast majority of testing sites in Victoria are run by the state government in partnership with various pathology labs.

A Victorian government spokesperson turned the blame onto the Commonwealth, saying “people shouldn’t be made to jump through hoops to receive help when they need it most”.

“The Commonwealth Government should fix this as a matter of urgency.
“In the absence of federal approach, we’re making sure Victorians can access free rapid tests - with 210 million orders and thousands being handed out at state testing hubs each day.”
The wait time for both testing sites and the PCR test results has dropped significantly in the past week, as the rapid tests have become more accessible in the state.
 

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