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Another Celeb denied access to Qantas Lounge [Dress code]

ameno

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2015
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I can't believe anyone is suggesting thongs are appropriate for a business lounge.
Thongs are good at the beach for the run over the hot sand between the car park and the ocean.
For pottering around the garden or satisfying the footwear rule on an unplanned trip to Bunnings.
Nothing else.
Unacceptable footwear in a supermarket let alone a business class lounge.
I'd deport you if I had the ability to for saying that!

My pluggers are sacrosanct.
 

juddles

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Aug 2, 2011
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Hmmmm....

I understand why some would take affront at the attire. But Jesus, what a hard caper to "enforce consistently" !! Clothing is very dynamic. And you can be assured that with such a topic it is completely impossible for Qantas (or any other business) to pre-define every possible scenario, let alone train staff and enforce some sort of "line". I commend them for even attempting (the impossible).

From my own perspective, in all my years of travel, it has never been clothing that has affected me or lessened my enjoyment of the product I have purchased (flights and lounges). It has always been simply behaviour that has done this.

I have no issue with a person wearing their flouro vests in a lounge. I acknowledge that they fly heaps (and thus deserve the lounge as much as any) and probably have a work rule that they have to wear hi-vis all the way home... Likewise I detest the brat in the million-dollar suit who disrupts the peace of the lounge with their loud phone calls.

Even though it is also a hard task, I suspect it would be a tad easier to concentrate on behaviour, not clothing....
 

kyle

Established Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2006
Messages
1,003
As I've mentioned many times in the past, I'm one of those who likes to dress down whenever I get the chance. As soon as I finish my office job for the day, I would change into my tshirt, shorts and thongs, what some people would call bogan-wear. I would also go to supermarkets and grab takeaways in my bare feet. Yet I also enjoy the finer things in life, be they business class travel, airline status, five star hotels, degustation dining, expensive homewares...

*sigh* Why is it so hard for others that there are people who just don't like to dress up? And some term dressing up as respect? I call it judging a book by its cover. Respect is having the appropriate behaviour and has nothing to do with how one's dressed. Can't we just have a more casual and fun society and be done with old traditions and protocols? I guess I'll never understand dress codes.
 

onemore

Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2009
Messages
322
Saw this and thought of this...

"Sweatpants are a sign of defeat. You lost control of your life so you bought some sweatpants."

Karl Lagerfeld
I think the same thing when I see people wearing crocs.
 

onemore

Member
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Jul 14, 2009
Messages
322
Much the same as the person of female gender who was attending to her toes in the lounge the other day, digging away some grime, or dirt from her big toe.
Guess she was happy as well.
 

jase05

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Jan 24, 2018
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As I've mentioned many times in the past, I'm one of those who likes to dress down whenever I get the chance. As soon as I finish my office job for the day, I would change into my tshirt, shorts and thongs, what some people would call bogan-wear. I would also go to supermarkets and grab takeaways in my bare feet. Yet I also enjoy the finer things in life, be they business class travel, airline status, five star hotels, degustation dining, expensive homewares...

*sigh* Why is it so hard for others that there are people who just don't like to dress up? And some term dressing up as respect? I call it judging a book by its cover. Respect is having the appropriate behaviour and has nothing to do with how one's dressed. Can't we just have a more casual and fun society and be done with old traditions and protocols? I guess I'll never understand dress codes.
But you have to draw the line somewhere and set boundaries. The rules could be relaxed a little but you can’t have open slather otherwise people will take advantage. I have owned and managed hotels in my younger days and I’ve seen what happens first hand when dress codes are shelved. You will get people entering barefoot then what next? Is no shirt or a bikini something you want to see in a lounge?
 

DC3

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... As soon as I finish my office job for the day, I would change into my tshirt, shorts and thongs, what some people would call bogan-wear. I would also go to supermarkets and grab takeaways in my bare feet ...
Rather than a matter of dress-sense, my concern with bare feet in shops and footpaths is more about personal safety. Bits of glass/debris or a tack on the ground causing injury to feet, not to mention getting home and finding the doggy-doo that has squished up between the toes.

As far as lounges go, although I’ve seen broken glass on the carpet, I haven’t seen any doo-doo as yet, but hey ..... 😀
 

kyle

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Mar 8, 2006
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But you have to draw the line somewhere and set boundaries. The rules could be relaxed a little but you can’t have open slather otherwise people will take advantage. I have owned and managed hotels in my younger days and I’ve seen what happens first hand when dress codes are shelved. You will get people entering barefoot then what next? Is no shirt or a bikini something you want to see in a lounge?
Take advantage? It means people are comfortable with what they are wearing. I have no qualms with bare feet, no shirt or just bikini. Maybe I'm too relaxed?
 

Vic

Active Member
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Jan 31, 2017
Messages
751
The Tiffen Room at Raffles gets this right. Allows non dress person to sit at the table, and then discretely offers a selection of clothes for the guest to wear and a change room.

Must admit, when I first landed on the shores of the Lucky Country (some time ago now) and saw signs outside Melbourne nightclubs stating ‘no thongs’ I did wonder whether I was in the right place.
Strangely I thought the same thing in Darwin when dress code was no thongs on Saturday night.
 
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p--and--t

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Strangely I thought the same thing in Darwin when dress code was no thongs on Saturday night.
You could have asked if it still applied if your thong was hidden under a pair of nicely tailored trousers. 😂😂😂
 

RichardMEL

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2014
Messages
5,072
SUBJECTIVE.

Whenever this comes up, and again look over this thread, it all comes down to being very subjective - and thus going to be enforced differently (or not at all) and this is my biggest problem with this. Second, it's not applied across the network, which leads to confusion and stupidity - what if I start in CNS (no dress code) then fly to, oh I dunno, CBR via BNE or SYD? (dress codes). If I wear thongs in CNS it's fine, then I get turned away in BNE? What message does that send?

but the whole subjective thing is the key.. everyone has a different idea of what "appropriate" is.. and it seems more and more these days we (as a society) spend way too much time worrying about what others are doing or wearing. If some person is wearing thongs and ripped jeans in the lounge.. honestly if they are well behaved and clean I could care less. It's none of my business.

Frankly I prefer to dress more casual when I fly because it's more comfortable. I rarely wear shorts (the community is grateful :) ) and never thongs, but if I did so what? I usually wear a (clean) polo or tee when flying (and working for that matter). and my personal standard is to be clean, wear deodorant etc and be presentable but comfortable.

Recently I sat near someone in a lounge who was dressed quit nicely but had a really bad BO issue. I don't blame them per se - we can't sometimes help our situation, and there could be any reason for it, but I was really wishing he had some deodorant or even aftershave to try and mask it a bit. I am not saying that someone like this should be refused entry, but often it is things like this that can and do affect others far more than someone wearing thongs (unless their feet stink! ) and I consider things that affect others in the area to be far more important than personal clothing choices.

.. and as noted many times by many of us... it's often boorish and gross behaviour, eg feet on furtniture, loud phone calls or face time, inappropriate language at loud levels or poor treatment of staff or others that frankly is a bigger issue for most of us regular flyers.

I know some would like it to go back to the day when everyone wore their "Sunday Best" to fly and all that, while others would rather everything to be super casual.. this is our society.. and this is also why dress codes like this are so subjective and cause so many issues. Decent intention, but a real issue in practice (and I agree with the problems for the staff who do enforce these things - they're the bad guy in the public eye)


imo
 

offshore171

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I know some would like it to go back to the day when everyone wore their "Sunday Best" to fly and all that,
Literally no one is saying that. It’s a false dichotomy to suggest that the only two options are Sunday best or no dress code at all.

There’s a massive middle ground that I’d say 90% of us occupy which is the entire gamut from just above the bare minimum (ie: meaning you don’t look like you’ve either just rolled in out of bed or walked off the beach.)

And that’s really the point, the dress code as it stands is hardly onerous.
Eg: No thongs or ugg boots is hardly difficult to comply with. T shirt, shorts and sneakers gets a pass. They’ve set the bar pretty low.
 
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