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Yellow Fever Vaccination

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Foreigner

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I will travel from Australia to Nairobi via India (and vv) and wanted to be sure if I needed yellow fever vaccination. I have heard of experience of other travellers who on arrival in India from Kenya had been quarantined for lack of certificate.
f
 

StevePER

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Don't know about India, but won't you need it to get back into Australia?
 

Tiki

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We just got back from Brazil and Peru and Aussie passport control did ask to see it. Also, when we checked in for CUZ-LIM-GRU, the LA staff asked to see it so I was glad we had them.
 

Febs

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Don't you love AFF? You're researching something, then within a few hours, someone happens to post a thread on the exact same topic? :D

I had two different doctors try to tell me I needed the Yellow Fever vaccine today, for an upcoming trip to India. Both told me I wouldn't be allowed back into Australia if I didn't have my Yellow Fever vaccination certificate.

After some research, I discovered it's actually on entry into India where you have to show the certificate, and only if you've been to an affected country in the past 6 days. The same applies to Australia, but not if you're coming back from India.

The WHO site mentions the following regarding entry into India:
Yellow fever:Anyone (except infants up to the age of 6 months) arriving by air or sea without a certificate is detained in isolation for up to 6 days if that person (i) arrives within 6 days of departure from an infected area, or (ii) has been in such an area in transit (excepting those passengers and members of the crew who, while in transit through an airport situated in an infected area, remained within the airport premises during the period of their entire stay and the Health Officer agrees to such exemption), or (iii) has come on a ship that started from or touched at any port in a yellow fever infected area up to 30 days before its arrival in India, unless such a ship has been disinsected in accordance with the procedure laid down by WHO, or (iv) has come by an aircraft which has been in an infected area and has not been disinsected in accordance with the provisions laid down in the Indian Aircraft Public Health Rules, 1954, or those recommended by WHO. The following countries and areas are regarded as infected:
Africa: Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Liberia, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Togo, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia.
America: Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela. Note. When a case of yellow fever is reported from any country, that country is regarded by the Government of India as infected with yellow fever and is added to the above list.
Foreigner - Nairobi doesn't appear to be listed, although it mightn't hurt if there's a chance you'll be staying or transiting through an affected country. In my case though, I don't think its necessary.

Cheers,
- Febs.
 

sue_in_oz

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Febs said:
Don't you love AFF? You're researching something, then within a few hours, someone happens to post a thread on the exact same topic? :D

I had two different doctors try to tell me I needed the Yellow Fever vaccine today, for an upcoming trip to India. Both told me I wouldn't be allowed back into Australia if I didn't have my Yellow Fever vaccination certificate.

After some research, I discovered it's actually on entry into India where you have to show the certificate, and only if you've been to an affected country in the past 6 days. The same applies to Australia, but not if you're coming back from India.

The WHO site mentions the following regarding entry into India:


Foreigner - Nairobi doesn't appear to be listed, although it mightn't hurt if there's a chance you'll be staying or transiting through an affected country. In my case though, I don't think its necessary.

Cheers,
- Febs.
I think that you do need to get the shot - as far as i know Nairobi is the capital of Kenya ;)
 
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simongr

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Also - isnt the bigger question not whether you should take the shot so yoiu can get back into Oz but more that you can get the shot to avoid catching yellow fever if travelling to a higher risk area? :confused:
 

lovetravellingoz

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Jul 13, 2006
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Febs said:
I had two different doctors try to tell me I needed the Yellow Fever vaccine today, for an upcoming trip to India.
The moral of the story here is that most Doctors are clueless when it comes to medical advice for travel......and so you should only seek advice from Doctors or Centres that specialise in travel advice.

I learnt this a few decades back when I was researching my first overseas trip to India and Nepal....and received bad and incorrect advice....or even just blank looks from the local GPs.

ie was going trekking at altitude in Nepal and read that women (ie my gf at the time) should consult their doctor if they were on the contraceptive pill. Local GP = blank look.

Local GP gave poor and or incorrect advice on malaria, typhoid etc etc..




So if you are heading overseas my tip is to go slightly out of your way and consult one of the Doctors/Centres that specialise in travel advice


PS...and yes Febs if you ae only going India you do not need Yellow Fever faccination.
 
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d15.in.oz

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Nov 28, 2006
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simongr said:
Also - isnt the bigger question not whether you should take the shot ... to avoid catching yellow fever if travelling to a higher risk area? :confused:
There is a "significant risk" involved in taking that shot itself, and it should be avoided if at all possible... of course - consult your G.P. for professional advice! & a relevant database - e.g. IATA via Virgin Nigeria - VNA Health & Visa information
 
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Febs

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sue_in_oz said:
I think that you do need to get the shot - as far as i know Nairobi is the capital of Kenya ;)
:D
It was late, I was tired....

lovetravellingoz - Unfotunately said advice came from a (admittedly, self-professed) "travel vaccination specialist" centre...
 

trooper

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Apr 16, 2007
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Wish I hadn't lost my vaccination card....

Yellow fever, Hep B etc... but the one that raised eyebrows was "Human Plague"...;) :D

I was so impresssed by that'un I kept the front panel from the ampoule box.... add that to the Pyridostigmine Bromide tablets and the Atropine autojects and you've got......

Well.. some pretty weird souveniers!!!:shock:
 

yo yo ma

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Mar 15, 2007
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Yellow fever is a serious disease which occurs in Africa and South America. It is transmitted by the female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and can be fatal.

Yellow Fever is caused by a virus and spread to humans by the bite of an infected mosquito. The virus causes sudden onset of fever, four days after the bite. Most cases are mild, last less than a week, and the person makes a full recovery. Sometimes it is more serious. The liver may be damaged leading to jaundice - a yellowish tinge to the skin. Hence the name 'yellow' fever. It may cause joint pain and vomiting. Eventually the clotting system fails and bleeding occurs from the nose, gums, stomach and skin. Up to ten percent of sufferers will die.

The initial or "acute" phase is normally characterized by high fever, general muscle pain, backache, shivers, headache, loss of appetite, nausea, and vomiting. Most patients improve and their symptoms disappear after three to four days. About 15 percent of those infected enter a "toxic" phase. In this phase, high fever reappears and can lead to shock, bleeding (from mouth, nose, eyes, and/or stomach), and kidney and liver failure.

There is no treatment for yellow fever. Persons with yellow fever should rest and drink plenty of fluids. Dehydration and fever can be treated with oral rehydration and paracetamol.

This is the reference for this information... It lists the potential side effects of vaccination. The information is obtained from WHO & the site is linked to the Brisbane Travel Doctor Clinic.
Yellow Fever Vaccination And Immunisation


Yellow Fever (YF) vaccine is required for the countries within the endemic zone (shown below).
 
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