The Impacts of Australian Transcontinental 'Back of Clock' Operations on Sleep

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oz_mark

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Interestimng little bit of research from the ATSB. I had never realised that pilots are scheduled to do an east coast flight after they have done a red-eye flight.

http://www.atsb.gov.au/publications/2007/B20050121.aspx


[...]
While there were some significant differences in sleep and subjective fatigue as a function of a single transcontinental sector of back of clock flying, these differences were, on average, of a magnitude that was unlikely to impact on flight crew performance and overall safety. However, when a primary transcontinental sector is followed by an additional east-coast sector, there is evidence of reduced prior sleep, impaired neurobehavioural performance, and high levels of subjective fatigue
[...]
 

JohnK

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oz_mark said:
I had never realised that pilots are scheduled to do an east coast flight after they have done a red-eye flight.
I would have thought the red-eye flight would have been sufficient.
 

ANstar

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I can't really see the issue if you do PER-SYD-MEL as a day's duty.

BA have their crews do back of the clock LHR-Moscow and return. Fair enough it is only 1500 miles each way it would still be alonger "duty" time than the QF PER-SYD-MEL example.
 

oz_mark

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ANstar said:
I can't really see the issue if you do PER-SYD-MEL as a day's duty.

BA have their crews do back of the clock LHR-Moscow and return. Fair enough it is only 1500 miles each way it would still be alonger "duty" time than the QF PER-SYD-MEL example.

The issue is that identified in the quote above, and how the issues are managed.
 
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