'Smoker' detained on Emirates flight

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The Rok

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A German man who allegedly had to be restrained on an international flight after assaulting crew members who tried to stop him smoking has been released from police custody in Queensland.

I wonder if he was an AFF'r?

'Smoker' detained on Emirates flight

The arrogance of some people is astounding. I watched about 6 hours of Ultimate Airport Dubai last night and some peoples sense of entitlement is way out of sync with reality….
 

TomVexille

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If you can't survive that long without one, don't get on the flight... seems simple enough
 
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SteveJohnson

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Amazing this still happens. I would actually have expected it to be a Chinese national, as they seem to be the ones most likely to flout the laws for smoking. Either way, I wonder what sort of cash penalty and ban will be placed on him? I bet Emirates will ban him for life from all EK flights!
 

ashleyn

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Really makes you wonder what is inside some people's heads ?
 

fersea

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I watched about 6 hours of Ultimate Airport Dubai last night and some peoples sense of entitlement is way out of sync with reality….

I disagree. I think if you pay for Foxtel you are reasonably entitled to watch it. Admittedly six hours straight is a bit much for me but if that what you want to do it is up to you.

I wouldnt call call you arrogant for doing that.
 

tinkybelle

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I disagree. I think if you pay for Foxtel you are reasonably entitled to watch it. Admittedly six hours straight is a bit much for me but if that what you want to do it is up to you.

I wouldnt call call you arrogant for doing that.
did you see the guy on the news??
YES he was arrogant.
I do hope he gets a huge fine and cannot leave the country till it is paid.
 

anat0l

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did you see the guy on the news??
YES he was arrogant.
I do hope he gets a huge fine and cannot leave the country till it is paid.

The fine, although still a fine and money to be paid, is not awfully substantial (but likely a huge dent in the wallet for everyday humans).

I'd probably half-expect there may be a countersuit against the airline in light of assault or the minor injuries he's sustained. Then again, as he was belligerent first (assumed), I'm hoping that may deter such a suit.

EK may or may not have blacklisted him by now.

My guess is that for such an offence, they can't legally confine him to the country until he pays up, so they'll likely hand him his passport back. If he leaves, he may not be able to re-enter Australia without paying the fine, but of course he doesn't have to do either.

If they manage to confine him here until he pays up, then who knows if he'll squat here for a while without paying. Not sure if that is ideal. He can't necessarily be imprisoned because that would then be in lieu of the fine, and as far as I know smoking on an aircraft, unless it has serious consequences, can't be punished via imprisonment.
 

under the radar

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once again...soft punishment handed out to those who think they are 'above' everyone else...smoking on aircraft constitutes a violation of air safety endangering peoples lives....hopefully other airlines 'red card' this guy and ban carriage of him.. may his next flight / only other flight be an excorted flight back to his homeland ...harsh you may say...but look around you....namby pamby gets us nowhere!!
 

anat0l

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once again...soft punishment handed out to those who think they are 'above' everyone else...smoking on aircraft constitutes a violation of air safety endangering peoples lives....hopefully other airlines 'red card' this guy and ban carriage of him.. may his next flight / only other flight be an excorted flight back to his homeland ...harsh you may say...but look around you....namby pamby gets us nowhere!!

Soft punishment for offenders of all kinds on aircraft is, I believe, both universal and definitely unfair.

However, legal systems around the world are extremely ill equipped to hand out equitable punishments for such offences. Not to mention that at least in Australia, the "out of character" argument for behaviour on an aircraft seems to hold quite some sway (for some very odd reason).

I wish it could change for the better in this regard, but I fear it will not, and not quickly soon.

In any case, this man probably could not be punished "properly" unless he was imprisoned. Fining him, as I said, may not be effective because unless his fine can be enforced in his home country (unlikely), all he will do is leave the country and not come back. He could be blacklisted from the target airline and maybe some others who seem fit to act on such an incident, but that's a rather soft "unfortunate consequence" as it were.
 

burmans

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smoking on aircraft constitutes a violation of air safety endangering peoples lives!!
Personally I regard this as extreme hyperbole, while I am certainly not in favour of people smoking on planes (in fact not anywhere) smoking was de-rigure on planes for a long time and I dont think air safety was the reason they stopped it.
 

under the radar

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The fine, although still a fine and money to be paid, is not awfully substantial (but likely a huge dent in the wallet for everyday humans).

I'd probably half-expect there may be a countersuit against the airline in light of assault or the minor injuries he's sustained. Then again, as he was belligerent first (assumed), I'm hoping that may deter such a suit.

EK may or may not have blacklisted him by now.

My guess is that for such an offence, they can't legally confine him to the country until he pays up, so they'll likely hand him his passport back. If he leaves, he may not be able to re-enter Australia without paying the fine, but of course he doesn't have to do either.

If they manage to confine him here until he pays up, then who knows if he'll squat here for a while without paying. Not sure if that is ideal. He can't necessarily be imprisoned because that would then be in lieu of the fine, and as far as I know smoking on an aircraft, unless it has serious consequences, can't be punished via imprisonment.

as long as there are 'lawyers' around who stand to gain (monetarily) from any type 'legal action'....
 

anat0l

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Personally I regard this as extreme hyperbole, while I am certainly not in favour of people smoking on planes (in fact not anywhere) smoking was de-rigure on planes for a long time and I dont think air safety was the reason they stopped it.

I can't quite pin down evidence on it, but inflight smoking as an almost universal ban appears to be international convention (ICAO at least?).

In many cases it is also enacted into law (which allows it to be tried in a court and subject to judicial punishment). This is a stronger tie compared to, say, electronic devices and potential interference.

I guess it was likely more passenger comfort that inflight smoking was banned, but at the same time, smokers can do some questionable things too (like throwing butts into bins which haven't been extinguished).

If you are to believe Qantas at the least, smoking inflight is regarded as a fire hazard.

I guess any way you read it, you can at least (to a credible degree) pervert the phrase "air safety endangering peoples lives" to suit any of those explanations.

In short, just don't do it!
 

DC3

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From the Legal Aid (Queensland) web site: I've been ordered to pay a fine - how long do I have?

The court will nearly always give you some time to pay the fine, with a period of time to be spent in jail if you do not pay the fine in time (called 'in default'). So if the magistrate says an amount and five days in default, this is how long you will spend in jail if you do not pay the fine on time.

If you don't pay the fine on time, you don't go straight to jail - the court will send notice of the fine to the State Penalties Enforcement Registry (SPER). SPER will write to you. You can make arrangements to pay SPER an amount each week/fortnight/month. If you do not follow these arrangements then there may be a warrant to take you to jail for however long the magistrate said was 'in default'.

If you can't pay the fine you can apply to SPER to do unpaid work (community service) instead. This is called a fine option order.

So, maybe fine defaulters can be imprisoned. The passport could remain surrendered if considered to be a flight risk prior to any hearing/resolution.

What happens after I have been convicted?
 
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markis10

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I can't quite pin down evidence on it, but inflight smoking as an almost universal ban appears to be international convention (ICAO at least?).

In many cases it is also enacted into law (which allows it to be tried in a court and subject to judicial punishment). This is a stronger tie compared to, say, electronic devices and potential interference.!

It was hardly universal and originated in the US as soon as the Surgeon General declared it to be harmful to humans

Smoking Regulations on International Flights | eHow
 
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legroom

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It was hardly universal and originated in the US as soon as the Surgeon General declared it to be harmful to humans

Smoking Regulations on International Flights | eHow

Looking back, it was ludicrous to sit in a non-smoking section .... which was 1-2 seats away from a smoking section.

There was, of course, no separate screening or ventilation.

What a breath of fresh air that regulation had been !

On topic, how recently did you come across an instance of surreptitious smoking on your flights ?

Personally, I cannot remember any transgression from my memory bank.
 

markis10

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Looking back, it was ludicrous to sit in a non-smoking section .... which was 1-2 seats away from a smoking section.

There was, of course, no separate screening or ventilation.

What a breath of fresh air that regulation had been !

On topic, how recently did you come across an instance of surreptitious smoking on your flights ?

Personally, I cannot remember any transgression from my memory bank.

I remember a CX flight in 1999 ex TPE, it had originated in Japan and on departure the last few rows of Y became very smoky.
 

froggerADL

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Looking back, it was ludicrous to sit in a non-smoking section .... which was 1-2 seats away from a smoking section.

There was, of course, no separate screening or ventilation.

What a breath of fresh air that regulation had been !

On topic, how recently did you come across an instance of surreptitious smoking on your flights ?

Personally, I cannot remember any transgression from my memory bank.

I was on an A380 last year where someone had a smoke. They didn't know who it was but were obviously pi**ed of judging by the tone and threats of the PA warning.

I don't understand why people don't just take nicotine replacements on the flight.
 
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