Qantas passenger faces jail term for stealing

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Denali

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It may be a mental health issue and not related to illegal drugs at all.
Some illegal drugs are a major a scourge on society, but not all.

I agree, sounds like a mental health issue. Considering the man's behaviour did not improve with time/sobering up. If it was drug related, I suspect prescribed drugs before illegal drug use.
 
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BadgerBoi

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I read that he broke numerous pairs of plastic cuffs? Cable ties or duct tape would have done a better job by the sounds of it. Both I carry on board.

I'm not sure that I'm very comfortable with the idea of random passengers carrying restraints with them on flights.
 
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We're also trying to work out what other large aircraft were in Cairns. Any eye witness accounts?

In Cairns on Friday......... EDIT- Wrong day....sorry!

IMG_6682 (2).jpg
 
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Denali

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I'm not sure that I'm very comfortable with the idea of random passengers carrying restraints with them on flights.

I don't consider them restraints. Duct tape has saved a few trips for me (broken bag, sealing box, place tape over sharp edge, once used duct tape for a fractured arm) and cable ties for scuba gear. I usually carry them in checked luggage but they also get thrown into carry bag.
 
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casanovawa

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I read that he broke numerous pairs of plastic cuffs? Cable ties or duct tape would have done a better job by the sounds of it. Both I carry on board.

So might a couple of knees to the head...
 

Hvr

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Long story.

I feel sorry for him. A lot more to the story than what has been published. Possible personality issues.

Not sure how much I can say but quite happy to relate my experience in person.

And this shows that there is always more to the story than is published.

Sadly in this country (and many others) mental illness is often treated as a criminal offence rather than a medical issue. Timely and appropriate treatment would decrease the number of incidents and be better for society as a whole.
 

JohnK

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Sounds like you were on the flight. Some cairns old timer on Facebook is trying to tell us it was an A380.

We're also trying to work out what other large aircraft were in Cairns. Any eye witness accounts?
The only one I noticed, and have photo, immediately on our right was the BUNDESREPUBLIK DEUTCHLAND aircraft. It didn't look big. A320?
 

medhead

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The only one I noticed, and have photo, immediately on our right was the BUNDESREPUBLIK DEUTCHLAND aircraft. It didn't look big. A320?

I'm trying to identify a 4 engined aircraft the departed cairns in the afternoon. They do have an A340. Otherwise, a 707 has been mentioned that I assume might be a tanker aircraft. All this based on a iPad photo with the aircraft a small lump in a huge expanse of sky. (I might start a thread.
 

markis10

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I'm trying to identify a 4 engined aircraft the departed cairns in the afternoon. They do have an A340. Otherwise, a 707 has been mentioned that I assume might be a tanker aircraft. All this based on a iPad photo with the aircraft a small lump in a huge expanse of sky. (I might start a thread.

I already answerer in the ot, it was the german a340 going to hanoi
 

JessicaTam

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Well dang. Not been picked up for it in all these years so will remember in future as I dont argue with security staff, unless its QLD security who think scuba regulators are dangerous weapons.
I didn't realise that either. Not that I have carried them, but still.
 
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I didn't realise that either. Not that I have carried them, but still.

I've carried them in hand luggage just about every (work) flight I've taken for about the past 6 years. Only the 100mm ones though, for hanging Danger/US tags when needed, so not exactly a threat to any pax or crew.
 

BadgerBoi

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I don't consider them restraints. Duct tape has saved a few trips for me (broken bag, sealing box, place tape over sharp edge, once used duct tape for a fractured arm) and cable ties for scuba gear. I usually carry them in checked luggage but they also get thrown into carry bag.

Several years ago I saw a young guy stopped by security at SYD, arguing that the knuckle dusters they found in his bag weren't weapons, they were jewellery.
 
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I wish people would stop getting drunk and making coughs of themselves on planes. Eventually they are going to ban booze on planes and it's the only thing that keeps me sane on some flights! :shock: :oops: :oops:

Nine MSN currently have a poll running about whether or not alcohol should be banned on flights following a call for it by an anti-alcohol group.

By the way, I'm not either of the respondents named Ian. I haven't responded to the comments section.
 
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JohnK

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Interesting twist in the court case yesterday.

Allowed out on bail to get married.
 

anat0l

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And this shows that there is always more to the story than is published.

Sadly in this country (and many others) mental illness is often treated as a criminal offence rather than a medical issue. Timely and appropriate treatment would decrease the number of incidents and be better for society as a whole.

It doesn't show that there is more to the story. The fact that is there may be more and what that is, if any, has not been reported. So there may not be more, or there may be, but either way we don't know. Presuming there is always a giant caveat which excuses completely the presented story is not healthy as much as presuming the original story at face value, even though the known unknown may be unfairly prejudiced / "less believable" than the face-value story.

And I've said it many times before, but the only thing worse than failing to acknowledge mental illnesses, is those who make a mockery of it and maliciously plead they have mental illnesses when they do not. Be that as it may we give people the benefit of the doubt, but I still look at such incidents with a grain of salt.

Maybe I only relate to my own experience with depression. Apart from possibly attempted suicide (or suicide had I actually gone through with it), nothing I did when I was depressed was patently illegal. Incidents like these - which we see manifesting on aircraft often - have severe legal implications and can also represent a threat to other people's lives (not just the person in question).

Nine MSN currently have a poll running about whether or not alcohol should be banned on flights following a call for it by an anti-alcohol group.

Sounds like an overreaction to me!

Although to be "fair", if they did ban alcohol consumption on flights, I suppose it would dramatically reduce the incidence of these incidents; or, we will at least narrow down the cause of the incidents especially if it is shown to have little effect. (Consumption of alcohol, e.g. from personal duty free, would have to be also banned and classed as an offence punishable by law). Baby with bathwater or European approach to the rabbit in forest joke and all that.

I guess unless we ever find out what happened in this case, it's still premature to even contemplate this question, and the funny thing is that it seems to shift a whole lot of the responsibility onto the airlines rather than the person. It is seemingly going that way for alcohol consumption on the ground, i.e. someone drunk who is harmed when he leaves a licensed premises seems to shift the prime (or whole) responsibility onto the premises rather than himself. That's really, really questionable.

I think that unless the lack of malice or likewise (e.g. a mental illness) or anything which viably discharges responsibility from the passenger (e.g. airline negligently serves too much alcohol) can reasonably established, an incident like this should carry a stiffer penalty, which may include large monetary penalties or mandatory imprisonment. At the moment, it seems it is far too easy to get away with misdemeanours in the air, with the only known exceptions to be (possibly) sexual assault, wilful and clear-malice assault and terrorism.
 
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