Qantas Domestic & International Business Class meals/menus

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Berlin

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No PDB and no spirits
I personally don't care much about spirits but can see ho it makes people angry- it's not that Qantas J class is suddenly way cheaper than it used to be so a couple of tiny gin or vodka bottles won't break the bank you'd think.

The PDB is where I'm annoyed and it hasn't been Qantas high for years now- choice of still or sparkling water? coughmon!
 

Berlin

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QF723 a few days ago. Amazed that they are still serving the chicken thighs in lemon thyme sauce.
Lol- that has been on their menu for many many months now! But not the worst dish, found it quite tasty in June or thereabouts.
 

SJF211

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Lol- that has been on their menu for many many months now! But not the worst dish, found it quite tasty in June or thereabouts.
I have to say it was actually the best today out of the times I've had it. The sauce wasn't congealed and the vegetables tasted fresh. I was also very pleasantly surprised to have "garlic bread," today. I do enjoy the usual sourdough nice but is a bit tedious after a while.
 

Berlin

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I do enjoy the usual sourdough nice but is a bit tedious after a while.
It sure does! I very much prefer the grainy one that they sometimes offer on the trans-Tasman or international sectors as an alternative. Not saying they must have more than one choice on a 1 hour domestic flight but some rotation for a bit of variety would be nice.
 

justinbrett

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I personally don't care much about spirits but can see ho it makes people angry- it's not that Qantas J class is suddenly way cheaper than it used to be so a couple of tiny gin or vodka bottles won't break the bank you'd think.

The PDB is where I'm annoyed and it hasn't been Qantas high for years now- choice of still or sparkling water? coughmon!

Yet on AA domestic J (F), they'll make you a G&T or any "coughtail" as a PDB, albeit in a plastic cup, but I'm not complaining.

Spirits are cheaper to serve than wine (at least the wine QF buys). Bit of an urban legend that spirits are more expensive.
 

Berlin

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Yet on AA domestic J (F), they'll make you a G&T or any "coughtail" as a PDB, albeit in a plastic cup, but I'm not complaining.
Yes indeed, unless you have a really cough crew which is like a 1 in 3 chance on AA. But in general I agree and it's one of the reasons I actually usually quite enjoy flying AA in 'F' i.e. J Domestically. Especially if you're in one of the furthest up seats, you often even get a full drink service even on most of the regional AA branded services.

I usually just ask for Sam Adams and rather than sneak in a second one :D
 

justinbrett

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Yes indeed, unless you have a really cough crew which is like a 1 in 3 chance on AA. But in general I agree and it's one of the reasons I actually usually quite enjoy flying AA in 'F' i.e. J Domestically. Especially if you're in one of the furthest up seats, you often even get a full drink service even on most of the regional AA branded services.

I usually just ask for Sam Adams and rather than sneak in a second one :D

If in some crazy world AA operated domestically in Australia I'd fly them over QF. For starters, the price of F is way cheaper on AA than QF's J for similar routes (especially the 0-3 hour routes ). But I find the US serving culture more reliable than QF - and QF FA's are quite slow.

Also I started flying AA just after 9/11 and have seen progressive improvements since - yet QF J has been on a downhill run.

Long and short, I'd never pay for QF domestic J (happy to use points) - but can and almost always pay for AA F.
 

Berlin

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If in some crazy world AA operated domestically in Australia I'd fly them over QF. For starters, the price of F is way cheaper on AA than QF's J for similar routes (especially the 0-3 hour routes ). But I find the US serving culture more reliable than QF - and QF FA's are quite slow.

Also I started flying AA just after 9/11 and have seen progressive improvements since - yet QF J has been on a downhill run.

Long and short, I'd never pay for QF domestic J (happy to use points) - but can and almost always pay for AA F.
100% with you: I'd have to be VERY needy of FF points and poor of time to pay Domestic J outright on QF (but don't mind at all if an employer wants to for out for it :p ) . But I find it a decent use of points AND always happily pay for Domestic F in the US.
 

Ade

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Spirits are cheaper to serve than wine (at least the wine QF buys). Bit of an urban legend that spirits are more expensive.
Is that because one can only consume so much spirits in, say an hour, but could potentially down a bottle of PN in that same amount of time? Like, I, for instance, might take an hour to polish off a nice PN, but I'd probably have 2*30 ml serves of spirit in an hour?
 

Berlin

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Is that because one can only consume so much spirits in, say an hour, but could potentially down a bottle of PN in that same amount of time? Like, I, for instance, might take an hour to polish off a nice PN, but I'd probably have 2*30 ml serves of spirit in an hour?
A good German liver can easily handle a bottle of both within an hour and the associated, admittedly slightly oversized, body still walks out the airplane up straight :D
 

justinbrett

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Is that because one can only consume so much spirits in, say an hour, but could potentially down a bottle of PN in that same amount of time? Like, I, for instance, might take an hour to polish off a nice PN, but I'd probably have 2*30 ml serves of spirit in an hour?

I don't think it's cost at all. In fact, spirits are much more airline friendly (take up less space and most mixers double as non-alcoholic drinks) and keep forever.

As for speed, that's up to the person but I think you'll find most people will drink spirits faster. I can easily do one every 15 minutes - I think it would take me two hours to drink a bottle of wine.

When they removed spirits from Y it was because some pax were getting too drunk - I still don't understand why they removed it from J, though clearing the wine backlog makes the most sense. I think we'll be calling it QF "J" (Y+) if they keep this stuff up.
 

Ade

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A good German liver can easily handle a bottle of both within an hour
I'd need good cheese & crackers to keep me going on a wholesome PN :)
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As for speed, that's up to the person but I think you'll find most people will drink spirits faster. I can easily do one every 15 minutes
Wow! you are probably like a few of my mates who can guzzle down spirits every 15 mins ... I can NEVER get even close to how quickly they can consume (& handle) the booze. I prefer to let the bottle of wine guide me in it's journey, blissfully :p
 

RichardMEL

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you can bet if AA operated in our environment they'd charge high prices too.

I keep finding these comparisons on price and service to be almost meaningless in different markets with different levels of competition, cost structures, employee groups, scale of operation and all the rest. You simply can't say "SYD-MEL is about the same as NYC-WAS" and then go from there (as example). There are so many factors involved that are dissimilar that t's a mostly worthless comparision imo.

I will say the one thing the US majors have managed well, that I seriously think Oz could definitely have and would possibly work out better for the airlines in the long run (and I had thought the introduction of Rex J into the mix may prompt this..) is the adoption of the cheaper premium cabin fares. What had been the "YUPP or KUPP type fares in the US" (pay Y, book into P) that could be inventory controlled but provide real price competition and incentive for pax to actually want to pay up if it's at a reasonable level and then the airline's not giving the J cabin to upgrades and staff in the main. Sure, have your full J for the FIFO's, companies with the travel budgets for it and so on, but those are not as they once were.

QF seems to use the odd dom J sales to grab these folks, but you can't rely on it as common. Current J sale fares sit at, for example, $399 MEL-ADL and $449 MEL-SYD one way. Thos eare actually less than the flex Y price. In this case, it's enticing to buy up to J for some (I know Rex has lower J fares overall, but let's leave that comparision to the side. QF clearly price factor in based on the strength of their network reach, FF program, partners etc to have a real premium over the competition, while Rex - and VA to an extent - need to price lower to get bums on seats because they - specially rex - simply can't compete on big items like network, partners and the FF loyalty). Anyway what if they priced in the I inventory for example fares at similar levels to the sale fares, put whatever AP conditions and capacity controls you like, but say sure, for half of the usual J price you can go sit there. If they like, do a QR and limit the perks - eg SC earn, FF point earn, whatever). those things may actually give incentive to more actually stumping up to pay for the bigger seat and slightly better microwave meals...

but anyway my main point is comparing AA and QF in this regard is, in my view, of limited usefulness. YMMV
 

justinbrett

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you can bet if AA operated in our environment they'd charge high prices too.

I keep finding these comparisons on price and service to be almost meaningless in different markets with different levels of competition, cost structures, employee groups, scale of operation and all the rest. You simply can't say "SYD-MEL is about the same as NYC-WAS" and then go from there (as example). There are so many factors involved that are dissimilar that t's a mostly worthless comparision imo.

I will say the one thing the US majors have managed well, that I seriously think Oz could definitely have and would possibly work out better for the airlines in the long run (and I had thought the introduction of Rex J into the mix may prompt this..) is the adoption of the cheaper premium cabin fares. What had been the "YUPP or KUPP type fares in the US" (pay Y, book into P) that could be inventory controlled but provide real price competition and incentive for pax to actually want to pay up if it's at a reasonable level and then the airline's not giving the J cabin to upgrades and staff in the main. Sure, have your full J for the FIFO's, companies with the travel budgets for it and so on, but those are not as they once were.

QF seems to use the odd dom J sales to grab these folks, but you can't rely on it as common. Current J sale fares sit at, for example, $399 MEL-ADL and $449 MEL-SYD one way. Thos eare actually less than the flex Y price. In this case, it's enticing to buy up to J for some (I know Rex has lower J fares overall, but let's leave that comparision to the side. QF clearly price factor in based on the strength of their network reach, FF program, partners etc to have a real premium over the competition, while Rex - and VA to an extent - need to price lower to get bums on seats because they - specially rex - simply can't compete on big items like network, partners and the FF loyalty). Anyway what if they priced in the I inventory for example fares at similar levels to the sale fares, put whatever AP conditions and capacity controls you like, but say sure, for half of the usual J price you can go sit there. If they like, do a QR and limit the perks - eg SC earn, FF point earn, whatever). those things may actually give incentive to more actually stumping up to pay for the bigger seat and slightly better microwave meals...

but anyway my main point is comparing AA and QF in this regard is, in my view, of limited usefulness. YMMV

The point, back on topic for the thread, is if AA can give you spirits - and spirits as a PDB at that - on a $200 F fare between LGA-BOS, surely - surely - QF can throw in a couple of G&Ts for their $500- (and usually much closer to) $900 SYD-MEL J fare.

The real reason is AA have two equal competitors and a number of smaller but equally fierce competitors (AS, B6)

QF has just got complacent.

Having said that, I don't believe the lack of spirits is due to cost, for reasons explored above.
 
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