Predictions of when international flights may resume/bans lifted

guiguioz

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2011
Posts
23
Services Australia has revealed that technology to allow Australians to travel overseas with proof of vaccination will be ready within weeks.

The so-called visible digital seal (VDS) project will allow Australians to verify their vaccination status with Home Affairs, who will create a “highly authenticated” digital record for travel and for use by third parties, such as airlines and other countries.

Services Australia said at the request of an individual, the department would send a person’s vaccination status to the passport office.

“What they will then do is take that data, make sure it’s all correct, and then they will put what they call a visible digital seal onto a certificate that they will then send back to us,” the department’s Charles McHardie said.

“And that certificate will then appear straightaway in your Medicare Express Plus app, and then you can download it to your phone.”

“That can be used at, you know departure gates, etcetera, wherever it may be utilized as as the borders start to open up.”

The VDS technology is internationally recognised and was developed by the International Civil Aviation Organization.

Chief executive Rebecca Skinner said she expected the technology to be ready within three weeks.

“We are confident that the technology will all be in place within the next sort of two to three weeks, well before the end of October,” Skinner said.

“Our plan is to have all of the technology in place so that it is settled and tested situation before the policy decisions need to be made.

“We don’t want to be in a situation where policy decisions can’t be taken because the technology isn’t ready.”
 

N860CR

Established Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2004
Posts
4,884
And if it's not? Why not have the home Q infrastructure in place and tested? If we get a variant that is more dangerous and we don't want in the community, are we happy to say we didn't need even the simplest of risk mitigation (ie a couple of day's isolate and test at home)?

Someone suggested it didn't make sense that we would need home Q anymore. I think there at least a couple reasons why health authorities might still want to go down that path, even if short term.

you’re still not answering the question.

What’s the plan moving forward? Do you advocate for permanent quarantine for the rest of our lives because of this fear of a “new variant”.

We have new variants of influenza enter the country every year, but we’ve certainly managed to live with that. And that’s with less effective vaccines that aren’t as widely distributed.
 

Pushka

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2011
Posts
28,902
Qantas
Platinum
Virgin
Red
Services Australia has revealed that technology to allow Australians to travel overseas with proof of vaccination will be ready within weeks.

The so-called visible digital seal (VDS) project will allow Australians to verify their vaccination status with Home Affairs, who will create a “highly authenticated” digital record for travel and for use by third parties, such as airlines and other countries.

Services Australia said at the request of an individual, the department would send a person’s vaccination status to the passport office.

“What they will then do is take that data, make sure it’s all correct, and then they will put what they call a visible digital seal onto a certificate that they will then send back to us,” the department’s Charles McHardie said.

“And that certificate will then appear straightaway in your Medicare Express Plus app, and then you can download it to your phone.”

“That can be used at, you know departure gates, etcetera, wherever it may be utilized as as the borders start to open up.”

The VDS technology is internationally recognised and was developed by the International Civil Aviation Organization.

Chief executive Rebecca Skinner said she expected the technology to be ready within three weeks.

“We are confident that the technology will all be in place within the next sort of two to three weeks, well before the end of October,” Skinner said.

“Our plan is to have all of the technology in place so that it is settled and tested situation before the policy decisions need to be made.

“We don’t want to be in a situation where policy decisions can’t be taken because the technology isn’t ready.”
The app is downloadable from the App Store. . Just need the QR code on the Certificate to become fully set up.
 

MEL_Traveller

Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 27, 2005
Posts
23,782
you’re still not answering the question.

What’s the plan moving forward? Do you advocate for permanent quarantine for the rest of our lives because of this fear of a “new variant”.

We have new variants of influenza enter the country every year, but we’ve certainly managed to live with that. And that’s with less effective vaccines that aren’t as widely distributed.

I think for a trial period, home Q makes sense. The world is just starting to open up, there's the potential for variants to develop and spread.

If the next six months shows that we have nothing to worry about from new variants, and current vaccines are effective, then get rid of home Q.
 

N860CR

Established Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2004
Posts
4,884
I think for a trial period, home Q makes sense. The world is just starting to open up, there's the potential for variants to develop and spread.

If the next six months shows that we have nothing to worry about from new variants, and current vaccines are effective, then get rid of home Q.

Ok great. So in six months, the current risk of new variants disappears?
 

N860CR

Established Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2004
Posts
4,884
Maybe, maybe not. But the data from the next few months or so will give health authorities time to assess whether home Q is needed, or not.

Sure. Hate to be blunt, but you’re just making this up. We’re sitting at over 2 billion “cases”. There have been a small handful of variants and none of them have been materially worse or have evaded existing vaccines.

Your plan would have more logic for a totally new virus.
 

MEL_Traveller

Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 27, 2005
Posts
23,782
Sure. Hate to be blunt, but you’re just making this up. We’re sitting at over 2 billion “cases”. There have been a small handful of variants and none of them have been materially worse or have evaded existing vaccines.

Your plan would have more logic for a totally new virus.

That's right. None have yet. That may change when people start flying around in large numbers again and variants mix.
 

Pom-DownUnder

Active Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2020
Posts
652
From the article:
"
Has the hybrid been detected among actual viruses circulating in people?
No, although the sequence is from a virus taken from an infected person, so it is a plausible hypothesis that the recombinant virus is in the community. However, it could have already fizzled out after failing to transmit to other people. The US has relatively low rates of viral sequencing, so it is hard to say either way.
"

seems a legit fear to overly complicate people getting their freedoms back /s
 

OATEK

Established Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2013
Posts
4,512
Maybe, maybe not. But the data from the next few months or so will give health authorities time to assess whether home Q is needed, or not.
This is a recurring theme from your posts - just a few more (insert a figure here [ ] ) months and then lets see. This sort of proposition provides no certainty, and is not based on a sound risk assessment. Life is to be lived, not locked up in fear. The key to ending lockdown has been vaccination, and sooner or later we have to be brave enough to go out again and put it to the test. Most of us who are actual or wannabe frequent flyers seem to be ready to live, especially those of us separated from loved ones on the other side of the world.
 

Pom-DownUnder

Active Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2020
Posts
652
This is a recurring theme from your posts - just a few more (insert a figure here [ ] ) months and then lets see. This sort of proposition provides no certainty, and is not based on a sound risk assessment. Life is to be lived, not locked up in fear. The key to ending lockdown has been vaccination, and sooner or later we have to be brave enough to go out again and put it to the test. Most of us who are actual or wannabe frequent flyers seem to be ready to live, especially those of us separated from loved ones on the other side of the world.
exactly, no-one is going to be roused from their home and forced to participate in some sort of satanic ritual with the compulsory exchange of bodily fluids, those that wish to can get their groceries delivered, can tell their employers they want to work from home and only put their bins out at 4am and run back inside.

no-one is going to be forced to do anything, people just need to be free to make their own choices / risk assessments again.
 

Pushka

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2011
Posts
28,902
Qantas
Platinum
Virgin
Red
This is a recurring theme from your posts - just a few more (insert a figure here [ ] ) months and then lets see. This sort of proposition provides no certainty, and is not based on a sound risk assessment. Life is to be lived, not locked up in fear. The key to ending lockdown has been vaccination, and sooner or later we have to be brave enough to go out again and put it to the test. Most of us who are actual or wannabe frequent flyers seem to be ready to live, especially those of us separated from loved ones on the other side of the world.
And let's face it, we are running out of years left to safely travel overseas. I'm so sick of the variants issue. Media blares the headlines 'scary new variant' one day and within 24 hours it's gone pffft. Could be an earthquake. A volcanic eruption. It's unnecessary chatter.
 

MEL_Traveller

Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 27, 2005
Posts
23,782
This is a recurring theme from your posts - just a few more (insert a figure here [ ] ) months and then lets see. This sort of proposition provides no certainty, and is not based on a sound risk assessment. Life is to be lived, not locked up in fear. The key to ending lockdown has been vaccination, and sooner or later we have to be brave enough to go out again and put it to the test. Most of us who are actual or wannabe frequent flyers seem to be ready to live, especially those of us separated from loved ones on the other side of the world.

And fair to say that each of the time periods has materialised and progress has been made at each junction. Waiting a few months for a vaccine to be developed, and then another few months for it to be rolled out. And we will soon be ready to open borders, Those opposed to waiting for a few months were predicting international travel wouldn't start until 2024-25. The timeline has been much faster than that.
 

OATEK

Established Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2013
Posts
4,512
And fair to say that each of the time periods has materialised and progress has been made at each junction. Waiting a few months for a vaccine to be developed, and then another few months for it to be rolled out. And we will soon be ready to open borders, Those opposed to waiting for a few months were predicting international travel wouldn't start until 2024-25. The timeline has been much faster than that.
Yes the timeline has been much faster than many expected, and that seems to be unsettling to some who want to wait longer instead of being brave enough to go out and test their vaccination in the real world.
 
Now with contactless delivery, shop online to get drinks delivered to your door or pick up in-store in 30 minutes. Lowest Liquor Price Guarantee. Biggest Range.

AFF Supporters can remove this and all advertisements

antycbr

Established Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2009
Posts
2,035
Qantas
Bronze
Virgin
Platinum
And that variant was found on 2/2/21.If it was a problem surely it would have supplanted delta by now.It does however tend to support my position that the next variant may be less virulent which is the way it often goes with viral infections and how the Spanish flu eventually ended.
I saw an article that Mu has been eliminated from the US because Delta has crowded it out.
 

hb13

Active Member
Joined
Sep 2, 2013
Posts
697
Qantas
Gold
If the health advice says we need to spend a couple days in home Q I don't see the problem.

Tourists aren't high on my agenda at the moment - not least because I don't even know what the tourist market will be once we are in covid 'normal'. But for Aussies wanting to travel, and for those wanting to come home what's the issue of a couple days home Q if it brings benefits?

This is not about mortality. It's about controlling the spread and making sure our hospitals aren't overwhelmed. (Which they already are.)

Most countries are only just starting to open up. Home Q seems reasonable as a small hurdle to allow Aussies out and back.

How about every other country in the world does the same thing and imposes a 2-3 day home quarantine on all Australians forever - and you need to have a home or else you can't visit. Are you happy forever not being allowed to be a 'tourist' in any country?
 

Enhance your AFF viewing experience!

From just $6 we'll remove all advertisements so that you can enjoy a cleaner and uninterupted viewing experience.

And you'll be supporting us so that we can continue to provide this valuable resource :)


Sample AFF with no advertisements? More..
Top