New Zealand records Fresh cases of COVID19

NZflygirl

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You can go and read the daily summaries. I do not read them all, but I do not recall such a case in recent times.

From the 14th Nov but not sure they provide updates on returned travelers other than tested positive but this one in particular they should. 3A60C822-AC31-4C64-BC66-EEA0C184F05F.jpeg
 
AMX001595_Travel-Insider_1100x260

lovetravellingoz

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No new community cases today.


Media release by NZ Ministry of Health
16 November 2020
There is one new case of COVID-19 to report in New Zealand today - detected in a recent returnee in managed isolation. There are no new community cases
.
Today’s case arrived from Singapore on 11 November and tested positive around day 3 of their time in managed isolation. They will be transferred to the Auckland quarantine facility.
 

lovetravellingoz

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From the 14th Nov but not sure they provide updates on returned travelers other than tested positive but this one in particular they should. View attachment 233696

Australia and NZ work closely and so I would be confident that NZ would alert the relevant health authority in Australia.

Looking back to 1 Nov there were a batch of positive cases when they arrived and so quite possible they got on the flight from Australia, bus from airport etc.
 

lovetravellingoz

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Another local transmission case.


Media release
21 November 2020
There are six new cases of COVID-19 to report in New Zealand today, five in recent returnees in managed isolation
and one in a border worker already in quarantine for the past two weeks.

Of these recent returnees:

Two people arrived from Qatar on 17 November. They returned a positive result to routine day 3 testing and are being today transferred to Auckland’s quarantine facility.

One person arrived from Germany via Qatar and Australia on 10 November. They returned a positive result following a series of previous tests returning inconclusive results. The person has now been transferred to quarantine at our Auckland facility.

Two people arrived from the United States on 14 November. They have now returned a positive test and are now in quarantine in Christchurch.
We are also reporting a positive case in a close contact of one of the existing positive cases (case B) in the November quarantine cluster. This person was self-isolating at home from 7 November, and chose to transfer to managed isolation on 11 November. They had a negative day 5 test and are now confirmed as a case today after returning a positive test at around day 12.

They remain in the managed isolation facility in Wellington. All close contacts of case F have been followed up, tested and returned negative results
 
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lovetravellingoz

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More salient parts have been bolded:


Media release by NZ Ministry of Health
22 November 2020

There are 9 new cases of COVID-19 to report in New Zealand today, all in recent returnees in managed isolation. There are no new cases in the community.

Of these recent returnees:

  • One person arrived from France on 17 November and tested positive at around day 3. They are now in the Auckland quarantine facility.
  • One person arrived from the Netherlands on 17 November and tested positive at around day 3. They are now in the Auckland quarantine facility.
  • One person arrived from Dubai on 17 November and tested positive at around day 3. They are now in the Auckland quarantine facility.
  • One person arrived from the United States on 19 November and tested positive at around day 3. They are now in quarantine in Christchurch.
  • One person arrived from the United Kingdom on 14 November and tested positive following routine surveillance at around day 7. They are now in the Auckland quarantine facility.
  • Two people, who were travelling separately, arrived on the same flight from Bangladesh on 10 November and tested positive at around day 12. They are now in the Auckland quarantine facility.
  • One person arrived from Spain on 16 November and tested positive at around day 3. They are now in the Auckland quarantine facility.
  • One person arrived from Italy on 16 November and tested positive at around day 3. They are now in quarantine in Christchurch.
The varied origins of these cases is a clear reminder that as COVID-19 continues to batter countries and jurisdictions around the globe, mandatory isolation and testing will continue to be of critical importance as high numbers of New Zealanders return home before the holiday period.

The Ministry of Health again wants to thank all staff at the managed isolation and quarantine facilities for their efforts in keeping New Zealand safe.

In other updates today, we can report that genome sequencing of Case F reported yesterday has confirmed a direct link to the November quarantine cluster. Case F has been isolating since 7 November as a close contact of Case B.
 

HappyFlyerFamily

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Not a community case but Pakistan cricket team with positive cases into NZ, plus they apparently weren’t following special protocols carefully

 

lovetravellingoz

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Pakistan men’s cricket team members test positive for COVID-19

Media release by NZ Ministry of Health

26 November 2020
Six members of the Pakistan men’s cricket team have tested positive for COVID-19 at their managed isolation facility at the Chateau on the Park in Christchurch.

The Ministry is confirming these positive test results outside of our usual cycle of announcing cases because of the high public interest in visiting sports teams.

All members of the team returned a negative COVID-19 test and passed a symptom check before departing Lahore.

Fifty-three members of the squad arrived in Christchurch on 24 November and were tested on day 1. These cases are the results of those tests.

All cases are being moved to quarantine rooms within the facility. Members of the team will be tested a minimum of four times while in managed isolation.

As a result of these positive tests, members of the team will not be able to leave the facility to train. Any training is conditional on a public health assessment, so at this time, no training will be able to take place.

The Medical Officer of Health at Canterbury District Health Board has sent a letter to the squad’s management to be communicated to the whole team, reinforcing that all team members are required to stay in their rooms until advised otherwise.

In addition, since their arrival, several team members have been seen on CCTV at the facility breaching managed isolation rules, despite clear, consistent and detailed communication of expected behaviours while in the facility.

The team as a whole has been issued with a final warning.

It’s important to note that all incidents of breaches occurred within the facility and there is no risk to the public.

Director-General of Health Dr Ashley Bloomfield said any breaches of managed isolation rules were taken very seriously.

“It is a privilege to come to New Zealand to play sport, but in return teams must stick to the rules that are designed to keep COVID-19 out of our communities and keep our staff safe.”
 

lovetravellingoz

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Two Auckland women test positive in Fiji border quarantine


Two Fijians who arrived from New Zealand last month are the latest confirmed cases of Covid-19 in Fiji, and both are in border quarantine.

The Health Ministry said the pair - aged 75 and 57 and who live in Auckland - arrived at Nadi Airport on a repatriation flight from Auckland on November 19.

It was likely they contracted the virus on the flight from New Zealand as "they were both seated near a person who tested positive in border quarantine", the ministry said.

 

NZflygirl

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Two Auckland women test positive in Fiji border quarantine


Two Fijians who arrived from New Zealand last month are the latest confirmed cases of Covid-19 in Fiji, and both are in border quarantine.

The Health Ministry said the pair - aged 75 and 57 and who live in Auckland - arrived at Nadi Airport on a repatriation flight from Auckland on November 19.

It was likely they contracted the virus on the flight from New Zealand as "they were both seated near a person who tested positive in border quarantine", the ministry said.

Wonder if the person they caught it from was just transiting NZ? Also wondering if there is an obligation to test those people given 2 older people now have it and are at risk.
 

lovetravellingoz

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Probable (since confirmed) case of COVID-19 in a returnee

Media release by NZ Health

24 January 2021
The Ministry of Health is investigating a positive test result in a person who recently travelled from overseas and completed their stay in managed isolation in a facility in Auckland.

In the case we are investigating and reporting today, the person had travelled in Spain and the Netherlands late last year for work.
While in the Netherlands she was in contact with family members, who subsequently tested positive for COVID-19.

The person left the United Kingdom en route to New Zealand, travelling via Singapore, arriving in Auckland on 30 December.

She carried out the required 14 days in managed isolation at the Pullman in Auckland and returned two negative tests as part of routine testing – one on 2 January and one on 10 January.

After meeting the final health assessment for release, she left managed isolation on 13 January and travelled home to the Northland region. She lives with one other person who has not been symptomatic, who has been tested and is also isolating while awaiting results.

The person started developing mild symptoms on 15 January and these progressively got worse. The person had a test taken on Friday 22 January and self-isolated at home.

Late last night the result was returned as positive for COVID-19. Further testing is needed, including a serology blood test, to confirm whether the case is new or historical. However, the CT value from the initial test suggests that it is new and we are treating it as such.

We are undertaking rapid genome sequencing to see if there’s a match to other cases in the managed isolation facility as well as to whether the person has one of the more transmissable variants we’ve seen reported recently.

Importantly, we are working on the assumption any case might be a more transmissible variant and are taking appropriate precautions.
It is too early to say where this infection has occurred — we hope further testing and investigation will helpt to confirm this.
This is a reminder to us all of how COVID-19 is an extremely difficult virus to manage, as we’ve seen overseas and here in New Zealand.

Movements in the community

As part of the investigative process carried out by the public health unit, the person was able to provide thorough details on where they had been since departing managed isolation. Four close contacts are being tested and are required to isolate for a full 14 days since their last exposure.
The person visited a number of places in the Northland region on departing managed isolation and went to around 30 locations. Importantly the person has been vigilant in using the COVID TRACER app since leaving MIF and we have been able to rapidly identify these locations and are in the process of notifying them.




Now confirmed:


1611467637483.png



Wellington: New Zealand has reported its first case of community transmission in more than two months, although there was no immediate evidence the coronavirus was spreading.

Director-General of Health Ashley Bloomfield said on Sunday the case was a 56-year-old woman who recently returned from Europe.

Since leaving quarantine the woman visited about 30 locations, which were yet to be made public.

Like other returning travellers, she spent 14 days in quarantine and twice tested negative before being returning home on January 13.
The woman started feeling mild symptoms on January 15 including muscle aches, and began feeling sicker over time. A positive COVID-19 test was returned on Saturday evening.

Bloomfield said health officials will conduct genome testing but are working under the assumption that the case is a more transmissible variant of the virus.

He said they are investigating to see whether its possible she caught the disease from another returning traveller who was staying in the same quarantine facility.
 
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lovetravellingoz

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NZ COVID case contacts test negative

Meanwhile, New Zealand appears likely to avoid a fresh lockdown despite a new COVID-19 case being identified in the community.

On Sunday, health authorities revealed a 56-year-old Northland woman had tested positive for the virus after completing her 14-day isolation on arrival to New Zealand.

The woman returned two negative tests while in her compulsory hotel stay, and was released on January 13 before travelling around the region with her husband.

On Monday morning, COVID-19 Minister Chris Hipkins revealed two of the woman’s six identified close contacts – her husband and her hairdresser – had returned negative tests.

“That’s some good news,” he told Radio NZ.

Health officials are continuing to rapidly contact trace the woman’s contacts and movements, asking for people who have interacted with her to isolate and get tested.

“Her husband would without doubt be her closest contact. That coming back negative is a good sign. We’ll know more as the day unfolds as to what the overall risk of this case is,” Mr Hipkins said.

The woman has been praised by authorities for tracking her movements using the government’s COVID Tracer app and reporting her symptoms to health workers.

The health department has released a list of the 28 places she visited on her travels since being released, including supermarkets, cafes and retail stores.

Mr Hipkins said new testing stations were being opened in Northland but the case wouldn’t prompt the government to tighten its border regime.

“We haven’t got any evidence that the 14-day isolation and two tests isn’t sufficient,” he said.

 

lovetravellingoz

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From the update on now from the the Minister for COVID Response Chris Hipkins and Director-General of Health Dr Ashley Bloomfield

1611534160586.png


1611534398557.png


This case is currently considered likely to have become infected late in their quarantine period. It is uknown how.
 
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HappyFlyerFamily

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Why is it called community case when it seems to have been overseas acquired? I know there is community risk.
 

lovetravellingoz

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Why is it called community case when it seems to have been overseas acquired? I know there is community risk.

The case was detected when it was in the community. I do not think that NZ Health has at yet formally classified it,. though they have confirmed that it is a confirmed positive case. It may show up in their data update today as to its category. The case was not listed yesterday, and so far is not classified in their data.

They today indicated that it believed that the person became infected while in quarantine, and late in their quarantine (ie is not overseas acquired and infection occurred in New Zealand. They also stated that they believed that they did not catch it on the flight) from a person that she was not quarantined with (ie not sharing the same room with).



1611550540691.png

 
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lovetravellingoz

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Update on Northland case, and 6 cases of COVID-19 in managed isolation

Media release from NZ Ministry of Health

25 January 2021

The Ministry of Health can today confirm that the woman who recently travelled from overseas and completed their stay in managed isolation in the Pullman hotel in Auckland has subsequently tested positive for COVID-19.

The woman and her only close household contact are isolating at their home south of Whangarei.

The Northland District Health Board Medical Officer of Health has undertaken an assessment of the case and their close household contact, and it has been determined that the pair are currently able to isolate at home. The situation will be monitored closely to ensure there is no public health risk. 

Following a further interview with the woman, contact tracing has now found the woman has 15 close contacts. All 15 close contacts have been contacted by health officials, are self-isolating and have been tested.

Of the 15 close contacts, so far we know that two have returned negative test results.

Whole genome sequencing results for the woman have confirmed that she has contracted the South African variant, B.1.351.

We continue to monitor advice from the World Health Organization on this variant. Currently there’s limited epidemiological data available on the B.1.351 variant, making it harder to study. The preliminary concern of this variant is that the mutation affects the body’s immune response to it and its transmissibility.

New forms, or variants, of the virus have become increasingly common around the world – and we have expected to see them here in New Zealand.

Link to managed isolation

Whole genome sequencing has linked the case to another guest who was in the managed isolation facility. Their genome sequencing results are identical, leading us to suspect a managed isolation facility transmission.

Early information suggests the transmission occurred between 9 January and 13 January.


Routine testing picked up COVID-19 in the other guest, and this person was transferred to the Auckland quarantine facility on 13 January. They have been classified as recovered and were due to be released but will be asked to stay on for now.

As expected, there have been other cases in the same MIF and we are investigating any possible links between cases to exclude transmission within the MIF.
 

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Probable (since confirmed) case of COVID-19 in a returnee

Media release by NZ Health

24 January 2021

The person started developing mild symptoms on 15 January and these progressively got worse. The person had a test taken on Friday 22 January and self-isolated at home.

A bit surprised it took a full week from symptom onset to testing, or am I missing something?
 

lovetravellingoz

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A bit surprised it took a full week from symptom onset to testing, or am I missing something?

No, I don't think you are missing anything.

In Australia and in NZ the rate that people present for testing is probably pretty good.

However on the news the other evening there was a story going through the current situation and one statistic that stood out was that only 17% of symptomatic people got tested for Covid 19 (How they determined that they did not say). So she may well have been of the same mindset that getting tested is not important.

She only went for testing once the symptoms got worse. She may have assumed that as she was tested twice in quarantine that she was not positive.
 

Pushka

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No, I don't think you are missing anything.

In Australia and in NZ the rate that people present for testing is probably pretty good.

However on the news the other evening there was a story going through the current situation and one statistic that stood out was that only 17% of symptomatic people got tested for Covid 19 (How they determined that they did not say). So she may well have been of the same mindset that getting tested is not important.

She only went for testing once the symptoms got worse. She may have assumed that as she was tested twice in quarantine that she was not positive.
A positive is only as good as the day it was taken on.

Their percentage of how many symptomatic people get tested is pretty much impossible to ascertain.
 

lovetravellingoz

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A positive is only as good as the day it was taken on.
Certainly which is why she did the wrong thing. She should have gone and gotten tested as soon as she had a symptom. You would imagine that NZ Quarantine would be advising all who leave quarantine of that

But while you and I see this as probably just common sense, the various media reports indicate that she is unfortunately not too unusual.
 
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