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Grammar Discussions

RooFlyer

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Just a matter of Style.
Thanks for posting that; I'm with this guy:

One notable departure from the sixth edition concerns punctuation: a spaced en dash has replaced the sixth edition’s unspaced em dash for additional, amplifying, or parenthetical material. “Crazy talk… You can pry em dashes—yes, these ones—out of my cold, dead hands,” one social media user wrote.
...

Perhaps the most contentious change concerns guidance on when to use numbers and when to use numerals. Prior editions advised using words for numbers up to 100 (for general texts) or up to nine (for statistical texts). This updated edition changes tack, recommending numerals for “2 and above” in most content.

In my sphere, its words for numerals up to but not including 1,000 and any lists of quantities. That ain't gunna change anytime soon. That will not change.
 
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MEL_Traveller

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Courtesy to the reader plays a big part. If I have a message to convey, I will do that in the most effective way, based on the audience. Sometimes the style guide has to be adapted for ease of reading.
 
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Katie

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In case anyone wants to get directly to the new public beta of the Style Manual, here it is:
Home | Style Manual

The last edition came out in 2002 (edited by Snooks and co, IIRC - mine is at home, and I'm back in the office), and there's certainly been a number of changes in the past 18 years that I've wanted guidance on Australian styles. I also use and refer to the Microsoft Manual of Style (now also online), Chicago Manual of Style, ANSI standards and a few others. I don't work in government, so this style manual is just one of many references, rather than being the guide that I need to adhere to.

I'm happy about the guidance on numerals vs words, and also using sentence case in headings. I spend far Too Much Time Editing Capitals Out As Though We Were Writing In German, not English. :p

I like this excerpt, a great example of fulfilling your own style recommendations:

Clear language and writing style

Use plain language.

Write short and simple sentences in active voice.

Choose the words that are familiar to the user. Only use the abbreviations, contractions, acronyms and initialisms that the user understands.


Oh, I just remembered another delight for me - "would of" made it in the list of common misspellings and word confusion. 😍
Although the people I know who suffer from this confusion are not likely to ever consult this style manual. 😓
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A bit like 'incentivise'. Blech!
I remember my first big editing project at my last employer, back in 2002. It was the first time I'd encountered the word incentivise. :oops:
 

kookaburra75

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I've always been a fan of George Orwell's Six Rules of Writing - the "... as little as possible, as much as necessary" approach.

Although, having originally worked as a Surveyor we had the punctuation and writing rules for plans and maps that were codified to the nth degree. The one that still creates controversy when I apply it, for an abbreviation if the last letter of the word is not the last letter of the abbreviation, then you put a full stop after the abbreviation. For example Street = St but Crescent = Cres.
 
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p--and--t

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I would say that you have had more than a couple birthdays, which likely happen on the same day each year.

But that would be wandering
Fred
That is news to me.

I thought we are all only born once (one birthday).

We hopefully have many celebratory anniversaries of that birthday.

We have one death.
 

p--and--t

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You might like to try: '22 June is one of my sisters' birthday.' ;)
Certainly if you adopt my convention (not recognised by the majority it seems) that there is only one birthday per person.

I fear though; my pursuit of the truth is fruitless .
 

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