General COVID-19 Vaccine Discussion

MARTINE

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Long Covid in UK is a very significant issue. Many very ill people were not hospitalised early on in the pandemic..but treated at home.
I was logged in on a webinar in London w a specialist physician recently (who haS long Covid) and numbers are huge. Treatments are aimed at organ involved/physical rehab as lung/cardiac/nervous system effects can be v disabling. I don’t know of any ‘special ventilators’ .. Shane must be very special.
I don’t know but he may have been trialled in a hyperbaric oxygen chamber (like that used for treating divers w bends). This is being researched - theory being high level oxygenation of blood prevents the dropping of oxygen which can intermittently recur with Covid patients post acute phase , is anti-inflammatory and (studies are being undertaken on this) can it actually reduce viral load.
My understanding is this is part of ongoing research..
 

ethernet

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Ref: The Benefits of Using Hyperbaric Chambers For Athletes |

I don't see any downside, only upside. And my bet there is a lot of chamber space going unused.
Actually the downsides are : can get a toothache, the compression and deco finds cavities, same for regular diving, and ear infections are known for real deep divers on oil platforms etc. Obviously no smoking inside is allowed.

Seems to me, subjecting somebody's cadaver lungs for a O2 pressure test seems basic medical research.
 
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ethernet

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Intravenous Injection of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) mRNA Vaccine Can Induce Acute Myopericarditis in Mouse Model

If so, the 'protection' would also be reduced.
 

CaptainCurtis

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Intravenous Injection of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) mRNA Vaccine Can Induce Acute Myopericarditis in Mouse Model

If so, the 'protection' would also be reduced.
That's incredibly interesting, a GP mentioned this to me recently after my struggles with pericarditis after my 1st jab. Interestingly, the individual who administered my jab at the Olympic Park hub was 'in training'.
 

OZDUCK

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Early days yet but this treatment by a 'pill' does seem to be a very promising option. It must be given early in the infection and has previously shown to be of little value to already hospitalised patients. Results were -

"An analysis of 775 patients in the study found:
  • 7.3% of those given molnupiravir were hospitalised
  • that compares with 14.1% of patients who were given a placebo or dummy pill
  • there were no deaths in the molnupiravir group, but eight patients who were given a placebo in the trial later died of Covid"
"US drug-maker Merck said its results were so positive that outside monitors had asked to stop the trial early.
It said it would apply for emergency use authorisation for the drug in the US in the next two weeks.

Dr Anthony Fauci, chief medical adviser to US President Joe Biden, said the results were "very good news", but urged caution until the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had reviewed the data."

 

Pushka

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Early days yet but this treatment by a 'pill' does seem to be a very promising option. It must be given early in the infection and has previously shown to be of little value to already hospitalised patients. Results were -

"An analysis of 775 patients in the study found:
  • 7.3% of those given molnupiravir were hospitalised
  • that compares with 14.1% of patients who were given a placebo or dummy pill
  • there were no deaths in the molnupiravir group, but eight patients who were given a placebo in the trial later died of Covid"
"US drug-maker Merck said its results were so positive that outside monitors had asked to stop the trial early.
It said it would apply for emergency use authorisation for the drug in the US in the next two weeks.

Dr Anthony Fauci, chief medical adviser to US President Joe Biden, said the results were "very good news", but urged caution until the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had reviewed the data."

I heard from a Prof today from Qld Uni said they had to stop the trials because the drug was so effective that it was deemed unethical to keep giving out placebo and they were becoming very ill or even died.
 

Princess Fiona

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Early days yet but this treatment by a 'pill' does seem to be a very promising option. It must be given early in the infection and has previously shown to be of little value to already hospitalised patients. Results were -

"An analysis of 775 patients in the study found:
  • 7.3% of those given molnupiravir were hospitalised
  • that compares with 14.1% of patients who were given a placebo or dummy pill
  • there were no deaths in the molnupiravir group, but eight patients who were given a placebo in the trial later died of Covid"
"US drug-maker Merck said its results were so positive that outside monitors had asked to stop the trial early.
It said it would apply for emergency use authorisation for the drug in the US in the next two weeks.

Dr Anthony Fauci, chief medical adviser to US President Joe Biden, said the results were "very good news", but urged caution until the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had reviewed the data."

It’s $1000 a course so can’t see it having widespread use really.
Might have some merit in v rural and remote places who do not have access to a hospital / clinic for Sotrovimab (trial on this was likewise stopped early as clearly showing benefit over placebo).
Looking forward to reading once it’s published.

The vaccines are even better at preventing severe disease and death.
 

TheRealTMA

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It’s $1000 a course so can’t see it having widespread use really.
Might have some merit in v rural and remote places who do not have access to a hospital / clinic for Sotrovimab (trial on this was likewise stopped early as clearly showing benefit over placebo).
Looking forward to reading once it’s published.

The vaccines are even better at preventing severe disease and death.
Big Pharma is missing out.
 

ethernet

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How to save lives. Now how would we get people to take notice?

1) Get people to print the barcodes at 5 times the size and 10 times the size. My camera phone cant read Woolworth's barcodes because they are lousy copies of copies. Same for Bakers Delight, as a very strong downlights interfere with my phone reading the QR. Any queuing or manual logging is an avoidable risk.
2) Run commercials saying time is running out. Shopkeepers are not delusional that the risk of a $1000 fine will not protect staff from no jab entry - vile word abuse. Some are setting up pinhole cameras so they can greenmail particularly abusive customers - payup, otherwise footage sent to police.
3) If you get Covid, a post hospitalization vaccination will not save you. Bit of footage on today's news, but if you asked the public at large in a poll, I think 9/10 would day it would be beneficial or lifesaving.
 

Quickstatus

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if you asked the public at large in a poll, I think 9/10 would day it would be beneficial or lifesaving.


Why do a poll?. NSW will be heading above 90% 1jab for 16+ in a day or two. Effectively guaranteeing same rate for 2jab
 

jakeseven7

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How to save lives. Now how would we get people to take notice?

1) Get people to print the barcodes at 5 times the size and 10 times the size. My camera phone cant read Woolworth's barcodes because they are lousy copies of copies. Same for Bakers Delight, as a very strong downlights interfere with my phone reading the QR. Any queuing or manual logging is an avoidable risk.
2) Run commercials saying time is running out. Shopkeepers are not delusional that the risk of a $1000 fine will not protect staff from no jab entry - vile word abuse. Some are setting up pinhole cameras so they can greenmail particularly abusive customers - payup, otherwise footage sent to police.
3) If you get Covid, a post hospitalization vaccination will not save you. Bit of footage on today's news, but if you asked the public at large in a poll, I think 9/10 would day it would be beneficial or lifesaving.

This is needed for WA, QLD, SA and NT.

Rest of the states doing pretty well without it, although Tas is slowing down.
 

OZDUCK

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More supplies of Sotrovimab, as mentioned by Princess Fiona above, are now arriving and the total order has been increased. And discussions are "very advanced" regarding the ordering of Molnupiravir as another possible treatment.

 

ethernet

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Does anyone critically read and understand these actual trial numbers and enrolled people. The PBS once did comparative analysis fairly well, and not falling for glossy drug brochure syndrome. When statins were first introduced, the drug rep proudly told the GP this lowers cholesterol. The Doc, replied, what was the life expectancy increase measured for those on statins ?Good question Doc, was the reply.

I think the Sotrovimab difference was about 6%. Ok possibly saving 6 deaths in 100, may sound good, but what if those in hospital have co-moralities / pre existing conditions. So it will be less than 6%, and tipping money down the drain for the other 94%. Like anticancer drugs, you would want to know which people it is not going to work on.

Moving onto UQ. They have some pretty good candidates I hear. How about trialing their stuff on people who are out of time. Again, what if Sotrovimab + something else worked well in combination. There is the problem with combination drug trials - they expose the relative economic worth or lack thereof of new drugs, rather clearly.
 

drron

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Some more on Boosters.First the official line in the USA.Boosters should be given to those>65 and those 50-64 with underlying medical conditions at least 6 months after the first dose.
For those 18-49 eith underlying disease and frontline HCWs the advice is that a booster MAY be given.

The EMA is evaluting the evidence of Moderna as a booster but they say -
According to the EMA, while this evaluation is ongoing, the agency and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) have highlighted their position regarding the need for additional and booster doses of COVID-19 vaccines in a separate communication, noting that “although EMA and ECDC do not consider the need for COVID-19 vaccine booster doses to be urgent in the general population, EMA is evaluating the present application to ensure evidence is available to support further doses as necessary.”

And in the USA vaccine hesitancy is dropping but slowly.
 

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