Feels Like Home - Series 2

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It has all of the (must have) jingoistic images of Aussie (outback, country,family) covers the national , and international flavour that is qantas. However I have NEVER enjoyed the irritating , strained singing in this one. The problem is (IMHO) you can never quite hit the heights that the Peter Allen anthem inspires. As an immigrant to Australia I think "I still call Australia home" is head and shoulders above anything before or since, but I think the message is overall a good one
 

Alanslegal

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Just like Series 1, Series 2 does not do it for me. It's too sentimental, makes you feel nice to be back home but maybe a tad too boring. It definitely won't make me open a new web browser tab right now and enter qantas.com.au ;)

However I wonder if the Qantas marketing team was spending too much looking at Singapore Airlines' commercials because they do say "make you feel at home" in several of their ads.

https://www.youtube.com/user/singaporeair/thelengthswegoto
 

MEL_Traveller

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And a grand total of one (1) non-white person across FLH Mark 1 and 2? Or did i miss something somewhere?
 

under the radar

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[QUOTE=Melburnian1;134247

I love farmers and rural residents but it is not typical for most of us to live inland - about 80 to 85 per cent of us live on the coast, and mostly in cities of above a million people, with the conurbations of Sydney and Melbourne unusual worldwide in how they together have about four in every 10 of our country's residents.

QANTAS flies to many 'rural'/farmers destinations, and shock/horror 'rural' residents and farmers travel :shock:... so why not showcase OUR DIVERSE COUNTRY AND ITS DIVERSE RESIDENTS...they also contribute to QFs bottom line, and quite frankly they are probably more easy going/less demanding/don't have a stick up their a***e as the 'citycentrics out there!!! :rolleyes:

well done QF for highlighting the diversity in OZ :D
 

funkyr

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I prefer series 1 - showed more cultural diversity and gave the sense of a more international airline.
 

andye

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I saw this on television last night; not as engaging as the first time I saw it online
 

Alanslegal

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The latest Emirates commercial with Jennifer Anniston is pretty cool; if you haven't seen it, it's basically Jennifer being stuck in economy, not able to have a shower or a drink at the on board bar; then she wakes up and realises it was only a nightmare. Sure ~99% of the population will never get shower at 40,000 feet or enjoy their heated bathroom flooring; but it makes flying desirable, creates a dream and something to aspire to achieve. It's like many of those glossy lifestyle magazines, they showcase plush hotels with $15,000 per night suites, being chauffeured around hotel's Bentley limousine and so on. ~99% will never experience it but it makes us all want it even though its beyond many of us.

Take this Qantas ad, and I admit I have been critical of Series 1 and now 2. What are they showcasing? Safe? Comfortable? Coming home? Home to the three bedroom brick veneer home in your average suburb in one of the capital cities. I don't want to see the average three bedroom home in the average suburb - that's depressing. I want to see a glamorous penthouse overlooking the water - will I get there? or many of us get there? Probably not but it creates a dream, a long term desire and it makes us want to investigate further.
 

boomy

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+1 for the Emirates add, it's brilliant!

JA copped a lot of flack over this add on social media basically saying she is disconnected from her fans who most will never get to fly in first class, like she supposed to represent middle class America lol.

Will be nice if QF will do some humorous adds. This type of advertising, if done properly, can be very effective.
 

Brettmcg

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The latest Emirates commercial with Jennifer Anniston is pretty cool; if you haven't seen it, it's basically Jennifer being stuck in economy, not able to have a shower or a drink at the on board bar; then she wakes up and realises it was only a nightmare. Sure ~99% of the population will never get shower at 40,000 feet or enjoy their heated bathroom flooring; but it makes flying desirable, creates a dream and something to aspire to achieve. It's like many of those glossy lifestyle magazines, they showcase plush hotels with $15,000 per night suites, being chauffeured around hotel's Bentley limousine and so on. ~99% will never experience it but it makes us all want it even though its beyond many of us.

As humorous as that is, it seems an unusual strategic decision to me. In effect, you're using a celebrity to showcase the benefits of a product/class of service inaccessible to those most likely to be influenced by the gloss of said celebrity. There are plenty of studies and research into why and how celebrity endorsements can work, and they will show you that many of those with the financial ability to purchase First and Business Class fares, have a more complex understanding of advertising works upon them and are therefore considerably less likely to be influenced by the perceived aspirational and prestige benefits of using celebrity. Admittedly, that advertisement (so I believe) was designed for US audiences as a salvo across the bow of the US airlines arising from their long-running battle against UAE airlines. Not sure if they are trying to suggest that the level of luxury and comfort shown in the featured product can be expected across all levels of service, but I assume there is a reason they don't feature their cramped Economy cabins, not the horrible hard "premium" product on their older 777s, 330s and 340s. Then again, Emirates is a law upon itself and is big enough to do whatever the hell they want in regards to advertising. I think this execution serves to further the perception that they are overly blingy, which is what their domestic market demands.

Take this Qantas ad, and I admit I have been critical of Series 1 and now 2. What are they showcasing? Safe? Comfortable? Coming home? Home to the three bedroom brick veneer home in your average suburb in one of the capital cities. I don't want to see the average three bedroom home in the average suburb - that's depressing. I want to see a glamorous penthouse overlooking the water - will I get there? or many of us get there? Probably not but it creates a dream, a long term desire and it makes us want to investigate further.

In relation to the Qantas Feels Like Home campaign, I feel there is a greater purpose being served than just highlighting product. In a consolidated, coordinated campaign, you have to work on specific levers at different times to bring about the desired action, which I would assume is booking flights and increasing loyalty. There is little to be gained by showing new J suites and First cabins, especially when there are carriers out there with better products on some of their aircraft. The long and short of it is that a majority of audiences of a TV and print campaign are going to be booking Economy. Showing them aspirational images of "a glamorous penthouse overlooking the water" would only serve to reinforce some perceptions in the marketplace that it is an elitist carrier (when compared with VA, JQ, TT etc.) I have been surprised by the number of people who've questioned my choice to stick with QF, because they believe them to be for "uppity wanker business types" - fine by me! :) In reality, a three-bedroom, brick veneer home in your average suburb is the reality for most people, and it is these people with whom QF need to strike a chord. Purely based on cabin numbers, Economy and low-fare pax are always going to constitute the bulk of numbers.

By fostering an emotional connection - ie. who do you trust to bring your loved ones back to you at important times - you bring the brand back to a much more human level, a theme which resonates with everyone, rich or poor. Especially after the grounding, there was an initial groundswell of anger at QF for having stranded many thousands of people at an important time of the year. I'm sure their research tells them that this has dissipated with time. There is something to be said for reinforcing the continuity of almost 100 years of service - something along the lines of, we've been here for so long, and we'll be around to look after you for many more to come. Qantas is one of the few brands in this country, which has enormous emotional connection. Regardless of whether they have chosen to travel with QF or not, there'd be few Australians who haven't smiled at seeing that big red tail in a foreign port of a long stint away. Everyone has an opinion about QF, informed or not, so I feel QF is really trying to play to that strength.

Qantas already has a very strong corporate business, one which is kept satisfied by enhancements to products and services, not which requires in-your-face reminders of privilege. The same kind be said of the types of FF who congregate here - we understand the brand and the offering so intrinsically, and are linked by our points accounts etc, such that we do not really form the focus of this type of campaign.

My thoughts only, but I really like the execution. Maybe my marketing background gives me some insight into the strategy driving this campaign?
 
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maninblack

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And NZ great over the years too. Why does Qantas think being depressing and humourless is appealing? Why not convey something upbeat about your product and your people not more sad tired crying travelers and their worried families. Might say something about the culture at head office, I dunno but I don't get the angle.
 
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Happy Trails

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I finally got around to watching this and it's just like the first one.

Welcome Home.jpg
 

MEL_Traveller

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Qantas already has a very strong corporate business, one which is kept satisfied by enhancements to products and services, not which requires in-your-face reminders of privilege.

Satisfied by enhancements or kept there by golden hand-cuffs? I'd like to see how the P1 CEOs and travel-deciders would fare in the 'real world' where award availability is actually limited or impossible to obtain? Where they couldn't just decide to take the family skiing in Canada and ring QFFF to secure 4x business class seats at short notice. Or take the husband to New York and snag a last minute upgrade, booting the bronze grandma and grandpa on the trip of a lifetime who requested an upgrade a year in advance.

I'm not sure how many of these P1s would survive in a regular program where seats and upgrades are open to everyone. I'm not sure QF keeps their top status pax through great service or outstanding product, but rather through access to FF program benefits?
 

Altair

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I had a Feels Like Home moment yesterday. First time back into the SYD First Lounge since March....after losing my WP status. Gee I missed it and enjoyed what I could before I boarded my EK A380 First Suite, well I went to their lounge too once I realised it was going to be delayed again by 30 minutes.....
Regading the JA add I thought it was about her dreaming of waking up in an EK 777 when she was on the A380....and of course she could have another hour on the plane due to ATC at DBX.....:p
 

Brettmcg

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Satisfied by enhancements or kept there by golden hand-cuffs? I'd like to see how the P1 CEOs and travel-deciders would fare in the 'real world' where award availability is actually limited or impossible to obtain? Where they couldn't just decide to take the family skiing in Canada and ring QFFF to secure 4x business class seats at short notice. Or take the husband to New York and snag a last minute upgrade, booting the bronze grandma and grandpa on the trip of a lifetime who requested an upgrade a year in advance.

I'm not sure how many of these P1s would survive in a regular program where seats and upgrades are open to everyone. I'm not sure QF keeps their top status pax through great service or outstanding product, but rather through access to FF program benefits?

Either way, they don't really have to be marketed to...at least not through this brand campaign. As far as I understand, that is what this thread is about, not the pros and cons or the pitfalls of the QFF program.
 

Alanslegal

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My thoughts only, but I really like the execution. Maybe my marketing background gives me some insight into the strategy driving this campaign?

Thanks for your detailed response. Sounds like the perfect marketing report to Qantas. I can just picture sitting there in a focus group / market research and then your report going up to Qantas :)

As you know there are no right and wrong answers ;)

The Jennifer Anniston ad - if it was targeted for the US market - works (for me) because it's gone viral, seen globally and people talk about it. Family, friends, and colleagues all mention it "did you see that Jennifer Anniston Emirates ad?" is not uncommon. Never been asked "did you see that Qantas Feels Like Home ad?".

Qantas Feels Like Home series 2 has approximately 1,386 views per day on Youtube (19,400 views over 14 days) versus the Jennifer Anniston ad has been viewed on average 130,945 views per day (viewed 4,845,000 in 37 days). I can extrapolate which is more successful. Can everyone fly suites? 99% won't but it won't stop them talking about it or dreaming about.

Qantas can continue to rely on "safe" "comfortable" "reliable" "dependable" such as what I am getting from their recent advertisements but none of my family, close friends or work colleagues have paid cash to fly on any Qantas plane in well over two years now - can't see that trend stopping. Sadly, we are booked to fly Qantas next year after a multi year sabbatical but purely because we are using AApoints and they were the only flights available. Points flyers, generally, can't be fussy on who they fly with.

For example, some work people love Etihad's The Residence - they have seen the ads, the videos, the blogs. None would ever pay or could afford to pay for it. Anyway, so just this year two colleagues went to Europe and ended up flying in their economy. If The Residence is unbelievable, then there must be a flow on effect and economy should be quite good. No mention of Qantas? We had friends come to our wedding in Las Vegas a few months ago, again none of them flew Qantas.

Qantas is safe and can continue to play on that emotional feeling, that's Qantas' prerogative but travellers are becoming wiser, they read more, travel more, learn more from their friend's experiences and so on. It is now OK to travel on budget airlines and as more people get to travel and learn from travellings, they start to know that flying is the safest form of transportation or the chances of something terrible happening is well over 1 in a million, so that "safe" concept is becoming a bit negligible.
 

BAM1748

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The latest Emirates commercial with Jennifer Anniston is pretty cool; if you haven't seen it, it's basically Jennifer being stuck in economy, not able to have a shower or a drink at the on board bar; then she wakes up and realises it was only a nightmare. Sure ~99% of the population will never get shower at 40,000 feet or enjoy their heated bathroom flooring; but it makes flying desirable, creates a dream and something to aspire to achieve. It's like many of those glossy lifestyle magazines, they showcase plush hotels with $15,000 per night suites, being chauffeured around hotel's Bentley limousine and so on. ~99% will never experience it but it makes us all want it even though its beyond many of us.


The only 380's I've been on are QF, but upstairs at the forward exit doors there is heated flooring, ok it's not in the bathroom but it was hot enough not to stand there too long in socks, it was the middle of the night so no one around to ask if it was normal. So all (if in J) can experience the heated floor in a QF 380 but I didn't see it in the ad. :shock:

Matt
 
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If I weren't welded on to QF. This ad would actually put me off.
 
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