DVT prevention and carriage of clexane needles in carry on luggage.

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by Quickstatus, May 6, 2014.

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  1. Quickstatus

    Quickstatus Senior Member

    Oct 13, 2013
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    I decided to get a prescription of clexane (injectable blood thinner) for my last trip to the US.

    I gave myself the clexane at the airport prior to customs and security and carried the needles through security. Carried same to security for connecting flight to Denver. Another dose on the evening in Denver. Did the same for the return

    i fully expected to be asked about the needles but was never questioned by any security officer.

    I carried a copy of the prescription in case.

    There are needle disposable receptacles at the airports i visited though i felt a bit of a drug addict using one.
     

  2. kelvedon

    kelvedon Active Member

    Jan 23, 2012
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    That seems rather more serious than the Asprin I usually take.
     
  3. Quickstatus

    Quickstatus Senior Member

    Oct 13, 2013
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    Aspirin has a lingering effect which i did not want as i was going skiing. So did not want a brain bleed if i crashed ( helmet on).

    Clexane for me is better in that once i was acclimatised the effect subsides.

    i was surprised though i was not asked about the needles at security
     
  4. robd

    robd Established Member

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    Have you had DVT before, or are you just trying to prevent getting it?
     
  5. Quickstatus

    Quickstatus Senior Member

    Oct 13, 2013
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    Prevention better than cure and Im not getting younger and i was travelling to high altitude ski resort via DEN.

    Also travelled in QF J (this in of itself would obviously help).
     
  6. robd

    robd Established Member

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    I must say I'm a bit gob smacked. You said "I decided to get a prescription for Clexane". I don't know any doctor that I could dictate to and get them to give me a prescription without having a medical reason to justify it. You didn't actually pose a question in your OP. What is the point of your post?
     
  7. Cynicor

    Cynicor Established Member

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    There's probably a lot more medical history to the story, and I'd give it with the right reasons, but I think the point was mainly about security and the needles?
     
  8. Cynicor

    Cynicor Established Member

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    I think some studies show more DVT from J and F- likely less getting up as people are more comfortable and more/better alcohol so higher rates of dehydration.
     
  9. Jack3193

    Jack3193 Established Member

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    The American College of Chest Physicians guidelines recommend that neither aspirin nor anticoagulants should be used to prevent DVT in long haul travellers - even those with previous venous thromboembolism and/or other risk factors. In those at risk, they recommend the use of graduated compression stockings and other measures such as frequent exercise.

    By the way, there is a significantly greater risk of bleeding with Clexane than with low dose aspirin.
     
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  10. Quickstatus

    Quickstatus Senior Member

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    #10 Quickstatus, May 6, 2014
    Last edited: May 6, 2014
    There was no question. Thats why i put it as a open discussion thread.

    The point was about security and the carriage of needles.

    (The DVT issue is a real one too but its an issue best discussed with your medical professional)
     
  11. robd

    robd Established Member

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    Oh, ok. I was a bit confused. I am sure there are thousands of travellers every day travelling with Clexane or Insulin and other medications requiring needles and I expect it is not unusual to see it. My daughter was diagnosed with CVST in May last year and my sister was diagnosed with breast cancer a couple of years ago, both requiring Clexane.
     
  12. Quickstatus

    Quickstatus Senior Member

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    I wonder if diabetics with their insulin pens and clexane users have ever been stopped so security can confirm their injection gear?
     
  13. Jack3193

    Jack3193 Established Member

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    I'm certainly not relying on Dr Google. But it sounds like you might be well served googling the American College of Chest Physicians and educating yourself about the credibility of their guidelines.
     
  14. Cynicor

    Cynicor Established Member

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    Sure. But NICE guidelines suggest there is no good evidence for graduated compression stockings (thought they do recommend them), and that there may be a role for LMWH in consultation with a haematologist.

    We all know medicine is rarely one size fits all.
     
  15. Quickstatus

    Quickstatus Senior Member

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    Im sure the organisation you mention carries significant credibility in that it represents a consensus opinion, but as I said my medical practitioner is my go to person for all things medical.

    I will google it though.
     
  16. under the radar

    under the radar Established Member

    Apr 8, 2010
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    QANTAS.com > Fly > Specific Needs > Medical Assistance > Hypodermic Needles
     
  17. Jack3193

    Jack3193 Established Member

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    Agree there is no one size fits all. However, as you said, the NICE guidelines also recommend GCS as the main preventative measure. In people at high risk of DVT, they actually recommend avoiding long haul travel altogether unless it's "unavoidable". Even then, they recommend the use of GCS and other measures in addition to consulting a haematologist to get advice on prescribing LMWH. I don't think those guidelines are consistent with prescribing Clexane to someone so they can go skiing.
     
  18. k_sheep

    k_sheep Established Member

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    Aspirin is an antiplatelet agent - good for preventing arterial clots, but no good for venous.
     
  19. kelvedon

    kelvedon Active Member

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    So is asprin of no help in preventing DVT?. I ask that as a laymans question, and not to contest your comment
     
  20. janelarm

    janelarm Junior Member

    Sep 21, 2010
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    My family has a history of blood clots and so I have been traveling with injectable fragmin for the last 12 years and never had any issues in the US. Qantas club also makes disposal before flight really easy.
     
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