Cabin Temperatures?

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Mrmaxwell

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I recently returned from overseas flying with several airlines (mostly in J) and found the cabin temperatures to be very warm across the board. Certainly over 21c (which I always assume is ideal).

The seats I were in didn’t need a blanket that’s for sure, and when I would get up and go for a walk I would always find a section of the plane (usually middle or back in economy) where it was at least 5c cooler (I’m sure some of the PAX there would argue it was too cold)

Who controls the cabin temp and why they push towards super warm? I found it stopped me from having truly great flights as there was just no air to be had.
 
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AviatorInsight

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This annoys me too when paxing, especially when in premium cabins and there's no individual gaspers.

The master environmental control system (ECS) will be in the flight deck. Depending on the aircraft type (777) the cabin supervisor may be able to control the temp a couple of degrees either side of the master setting (21ºc). On the 737 though it is all controlled through the flight deck, there's no controls in the cabin for the flight attendants. I usually find there are no complaints when I can keep the air coming out of the gaspers at around 20ºc. A very finicky control and constantly needs updating until the cruise.
 
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RooFlyer

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On numerous international flights I've had cause to politely enquire "if others are feeling warm, and if so, maybe the temperature might be lowered". Often met with success.

I've often thought that the general temp setting (where controlled by the cabin supervisor) might be set up a few degrees as the door areas, where the FAs etc mostly are, is generally a bit cooler than might be comfortable for them.

Premium cabins with seats with enclosed doors etc, and no air vents are the pits. Etihad F 'Apartments', I'm looking at you.
 

ozjuice

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ahhh....hence my last thread regarding fans. Yes it's usually very hot and uncomfortable for me.
 

opusman

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Almost always find it too warm. I can't remember ever being cold on a plane. I always laugh when I see the blankets!
 

jb747

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Almost always find it too warm. I can't remember ever being cold on a plane. I always laugh when I see the blankets!

Get a seat near a door. They're normally freezing.

The temps are about 21ºC. Even when the cabin crew can modify them, we still see the end result, and it rarely varies, unless the system is having problems.
 

Mrmaxwell

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The temps are about 21ºC

The flights I flew the cabin temp was nowhere near 21c up front of the plane (including QF330 and EK777)

Coming back home in J on A330 again very very warm however I got some relief by opening the overhead fan fully and pointing it away from me this cooling my surrounding area just a little.

If 21c is indeed the ‘standard’ setting I would say the majority of aircraft are faulty - the temp might be 21c right next to the gauge but certainly not evenly through the aircraft.
 

eddie 73

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I thought it was just me, and strongly agree. Fly QF J to HKG and LAX a few times each year.

Normally, very discreetly remove pj bottoms mid-flight and stick leg outside the blanket whilst trying to sleep.

Then pre-breakfast, re-robe, and find blanket needed, as id J cabin temp cools/chills on final 2hrs & descent.
 

RooFlyer

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Get a seat near a door. They're normally freezing.

The temps are about 21ºC. Even when the cabin crew can modify them, we still see the end result, and it rarely varies, unless the system is having problems.

I've seen you post similar before in the ATP thread and thought of that before I posted above ... yet I am in no doubt that some temp adjustments have resulted in a noticeably cooler cabin - to me and others. J or F flights on JAL, LH and CX come to mind. Yes, maybe a fault, but it happens pretty often (hot cabin).

i sometimes wonder if the manufacturer settings haven't kept up with the additional heat generated by bigger and bigger IFE screens and associated under-seat stuff and increased use of electronic devices on board.
 

ozjuice

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Would be interesting to take a thermometer on the plane.
 

Mattg

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I was once asked by the CSM when sitting in J what I thought of the cabin temperature, and if I thought he should turn the thermostat down a couple of degrees. Now that is proactive!

Generally though I agree that cabins are too warm. There are probably others that find it too cold - you can't please everyone! :p
 

pauly7

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A serial offender for me is Etihad (all J travel) they seem to keep their cabins almost as hot as the desert their home hub is in! :(
 

juddles

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I agree that cabin temperatures vary, but it is no big issue for me. I have felt overly warm on some, froze on others. But it has never really been a big issue. Anyone who travels without the clothing to adjust to some air temp differences shouldn't be travelling :p

I actually thought that the increasing prevalence of warmer temperatures was a ploy by the airlines, in similar vain to offerring a hot chocolate drink, that they hope the masses sleep on those long-haul flights and thus make less drain on the reduced cabin crew. I despise that new era of airline thinking - I way preferred it back in the truly glorious days when airlines actually understood their pax desires, and plied them with alcohol the whole flight. (and provided packs of smokes with your meal tray :) )

But I also recognize that times have changed, and so the desires of the pax. Now that international air travel is cheap enough for anyone to do it, the flair and fun of what was a really novel experience has died. Likewise all those that travel for work, who desire rest and sleep aboard! That is such a new notion!

Yet it appears the new age "road warriors" of the air can't pack a jumper, or some light pants.....
 

Archipelago

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Being based in SE Asia, and generally close to the equator - I've often wondered on cabin temps.
Oddly enough we seem to get the worst of it prior to and just after departure - understandably, given boarding in a hot and humid climate.
The overhead fans are always needed, I'm always drowning in sweat by the time I get on board.

In flight, I prefer a colder cabin temp myself.

Noted the OP's avatar pic is of Nok Air, one of the LCC's here in Thailand where I am based :)

On my J flights with MH last week heading to & from Malaysia ex-coughet, the cabin staff were proactive in asking about the cabin temp, which was great.
 

jb747

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The crew rest spaces behind the coughpit of the 380 have individual heat controls. It’s interesting seeing the range of temperatures that are selected by prior occupants. I made it a habit to always reset the heater any time I entered the rest. Personally, I liked it on the hot end of the scale, and set 23-24º. Others as low as the mid teens. That was always a hassle at changeover, as it took time to establish any new temperature, especially if a lot of heating was required.

If the heating failed, the rest would become unusable within a couple of hours, unless you happened to be an Eskimo.
 

opusman

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Anyone who travels without the clothing to adjust to some air temp differences shouldn't be travelling :p

There's a limit to how much clothing you can remove on a plane without triggering an unwelcome reception at the destination airport ;)
 

jb747

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There's a limit to how much clothing you can remove on a plane without triggering an unwelcome reception at the destination airport ;)

Doesn't it depend upon what you look like?
 
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