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Building a Home

Matt_01

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I think we're getting a tiled splash back.
I recall you mentioning this so I reverted to page 1 of this thread and found post #4 when you first mentioned the tiled splash backs. If you can I would suggest you use the benchtop caesarstone or a matching/ complementary glass colour as a splashback. New tile and grout looks nice at first but it does not take long for cooking fats, dust etc. to discolour grout and the silicone joins will discolour over time. Just my thoughts
 
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Julesmac

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Take your biggest kitchen utensil - it's usually the soup ladle! - & test it out in the utensil drawer. Almost always utensil drawers are made to the same dimensions as the cutlery drawer &not deep or wide enough to contain all the equipment
 

Vic

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Different burners too. But it's an easy job to swap them.

Most range hoods are rubbish. Do some research on Quasair.

If you have 3 phase installed, then you can have more solar. It is normally limited to 5 kw per phase.
Thanks I didn't know about the burners.

We don't have a range hood, but one of those bathroom style fans. It's very industrial chic, rather than aesthetically pleasing.

One of the people I was thinking about has something like a 15 kW solar system.
 

samh004

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I recall you mentioning this so I reverted to page 1 of this thread and found post #4 when you first mentioned the tiled splash backs. If you can I would suggest you use the benchtop marble or a matching/ complementary glass colour as a splashback. New tile and grout looks nice at first but it does not take long for cooking fats, dust etc. to discolour grout and the silicone joins will discolour over time. Just my thoughts
I have a glass splashback and I love it. No grubby grout and super easy to keep clean. It comes in a range of colours.
Maybe Think about a glass splash back. I find that grubby stuff gets into grout no matter how quickly I clean it up?
As always, it comes down to cost. The house and land is at the upper end of what we can afford right now (home builder and first home buyer notwithstanding), and the many extras are eating into all facets of future life (I may never board a plane again at this rate). The build will likely be as standard as they come, with a few changes... some of the ideas in this thread make sense, but I haven't won the lottery nor do I have a high enough paying job :p if I did, I might be talking about my country estate build instead. ;)

Everything will be considered when we get into the design studio, but adding a glass spashback at the prices they charge could mean keeping batten lights throughout the house. Adding 1km of Cat6 cable could mean not installing the glass splashback. Lots of great ideas but Sam doesn't have enough money to fund them all. :(
 

Pushka

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As always, it comes down to cost. The house and land is at the upper end of what we can afford right now (home builder and first home buyer notwithstanding), and the many extras are eating into all facets of future life (I may never board a plane again at this rate). The build will likely be as standard as they come, with a few changes... some of the ideas in this thread make sense, but I haven't won the lottery nor do I have a high enough paying job :p if I did, I might be talking about my country estate build instead. ;)

Everything will be considered when we get into the design studio, but adding a glass spashback at the prices they charge could mean keeping batten lights throughout the house. Adding 1km of Cat6 cable could mean not installing the glass splashback. Lots of great ideas but Sam doesn't have enough money to fund them all. :(
Agree. It chips away. Get the bones right and you can flesh out the add ons later.

One thing I did to cover the tiles when cooking was to put one of those glass “mats“ usually used as a fancy cutting board behind the stove top. Then when needed it could be washed in the dishwasher. Being clear you didn’t really see it against the tiles.
 

tgh

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We used extra large rectified tiles as a splashback, lots of colours and textures available.
Miles cheaper than other stuff , a very clean look with minimal grouting and has stood the test of time.
 

VPS

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When I built my house the cabinet maker suggested some of the shelves in the kitchen cupboards (this was way before drawers) have a half height shelf at the back (half the depth of the cupboard). This meant you effectively had 50% more shelf space and was great for cans and small jars of things
 

vetrade

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To minimise the number of grout lines in our guest kitchenette, we used 900 x 300 plain white porcelain tiles for the splashback, arranged vertically.
They were cheap and took minimal time to lay as they only needed a single cut to length on the long side. Only one vertical grout line every 300mm and I think it looks good.
 

p--and--t

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Nothing to do with the op or this thread intrinsically, but some recollections.

Another time in another era, but my first build was at a time when a roof over the head with enough bedrooms (3) in the shell was the first consideration. On handover the floors were bare unfinished concrete (except in wet areas, no kitchen cabinets, no stove, no hotplates, no window furnishings, no carport or garage.

We survived.

Old donated sheets nailed at the windows. An electric jug and an electric frypan as wedding presents for cooking. Some left over scraps of carpets edged made do as mats for the floor. As money came in, i came home after work and laid some 30x30 vinyl tiles from Kmart on the floor myself, each week buying 2-3 boxes more until a few months out the family room and kitchen and one bedroom were done. Eventually being able to afford some kitchen cupboards and a few months later installed the hotplates to the cable that had been hanging out of the wall since handover. Washing nappies in an old secondhand hoover twin tub washer and clothes drying on a rope outside in the sun.

It seems today its almost life will not go on unless there is ducted aircon, paving, landscaping, fencing, a media room, a dishwasher and a walk-in pantry and pleas in the media month on end that housing is so unaffordable.

A different time, a different era, different expectations.
 
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Pushka

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Nothing to do with the op or this thread intrinsically, but some recollections.

Another time in another era, but my first build was at a time when a roof over the head with enough bedrooms (3) in the shell was the first consideration. On handover the floors were bare unfinished concrete (except in wet areas, no kitchen cabinets, no stove, no hotplates, no window furnishings, no carport or garage.

We survived.

Old donated sheets nailed at the windows. An electric jug and an electric frypan as wedding presents for cooking. Some left over scraps of carpets edged made do as mats for the floor. As money came in, i came home after work and laid some 30x30 vinyl tiles from Kmart on the floor myself, each week buying 2-3 boxes more until a few months out the family room and kitchen and one bedroom were done. Eventually being able to afford some kitchen cupboards and a few months later installed the hotplates to the cable that had been hanging out of the wall since handover. Washing nappies in an old secondhand hoover twin tub washer and clothes drying on a rope outside in the sun.

It seems today its almost life will not go on unless there is ducted aircon, paving, landscaping, fencing, a media room, a dishwasher and a walk-in pantry and pleas in the media month on end that housing is so unaffordable.

A different time, a different era, different expectations.
I'm guessing mid '70's. We had the same. Everything was second hand including the bed. And only a double! Three small bedrooms. Sheets. Everywhere. I do want better for the kids though!
 

p--and--t

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I'm guessing mid '70's. We had the same. Everything was second hand including the bed. And only a double! Three small bedrooms. Sheets. Everywhere. I do want better for the kids though!
Yes mid-70's was my first build and was supposed to be my forever home, not to be for various reasons (a divorce helps haha).

Since then 13 purchases and 20 builds later, still engaged with this type of thread.

I thought I was quite settled now, but in the last week now thinking more and more about one last move, build or buy, to live in until I cark it (to somewhere a bit warmer - just to clarify, before I cark it - being a non-believer I wasn't thinking about that other place).

The excitement of the planning and watching construction of a build is just as strong as planning an overseas holiday to somewhere none of your friends have been (and some would never go)

One thing I've not done to date is a buy to renovate. Probably never will - too limiting to the imagination. (I have renovated/extended in situ after a couple of decades)
 
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p--and--t

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Back on topic, one thing I've learned the hard way a few years after the fact is a builder will always install an a/c motor at least one size smaller than is required for the space to be conditioned (even taking into account zoning) resulting in a motor burn out just after the warrantee has expired. Best to check the volume of space to be conditioned and the recommended HP of the main compressor. Invariably the one the builder has selected is at the bottom (or lower) of the recommended range of models, the differential in initial price being miniscule compared to replacement cost.
 

TheRealTMA

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Maybe Think about a glass splash back. I find that grubby stuff gets into grout no matter how quickly I clean it up?
We put in a full glass splashback behind stove and along bench dome 20 years ago. It has been brilliant. Worth every cent (dollar). Highly recommend. Also, We used mainly drawers, Blum soft-close drawers with inner drawers as well. That is one drawer with a smaller inner drawer like a shelf. (much like the inner shelf suggested by VPS above but easier access.)

If you’ve got the funds, a ZIP Filter system with boiling/cold (and now soda). Has also been worth its price.
 

travelislife

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I recall you mentioning this so I reverted to page 1 of this thread and found post #4 when you first mentioned the tiled splash backs. If you can I would suggest you use the benchtop caesarstone or a matching/ complementary glass colour as a splashback. New tile and grout looks nice at first but it does not take long for cooking fats, dust etc. to discolour grout and the silicone joins will discolour over time. Just my thoughts
100% agree! We used the same benchtop stone on kitchen, pantry and laundry splashbacks. No grout to clean!
 

travelislife

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As always, it comes down to cost. The house and land is at the upper end of what we can afford right now (home builder and first home buyer notwithstanding), and the many extras are eating into all facets of future life (I may never board a plane again at this rate). The build will likely be as standard as they come, with a few changes... some of the ideas in this thread make sense, but I haven't won the lottery nor do I have a high enough paying job :p if I did, I might be talking about my country estate build instead. ;)

Everything will be considered when we get into the design studio, but adding a glass spashback at the prices they charge could mean keeping batten lights throughout the house. Adding 1km of Cat6 cable could mean not installing the glass splashback. Lots of great ideas but Sam doesn't have enough money to fund them all. :(
Good attitude! In all seriousness it doesn't matter how big your budget is $200k, $500k, or even $5m, there are always compromises on cost and it never seems to be enough to get everything you 'want'. Like I said earlier a lot of things won't actually improve your lifestyle nor the value of your home so better to keep the money in your pocket now and see what you really need once you move in, because there will be things you want a contingency fund for (window furnishings aren't cheap!).

We moved in to our place with some things not done, knowing full well we could do it down the track (extra cabinetry, front fence, deck, landscaping, etc.) but it wouldn't affect our immediate enjoyment of living there, but would have added a lot of $$ to the build price if we tried to wrap it all in at once.
 

TomVexille

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Nothing to do with the op or this thread intrinsically, but some recollections.

Another time in another era, but my first build was at a time when a roof over the head with enough bedrooms (3) in the shell was the first consideration. On handover the floors were bare unfinished concrete (except in wet areas, no kitchen cabinets, no stove, no hotplates, no window furnishings, no carport or garage.

We survived.

Old donated sheets nailed at the windows. An electric jug and an electric frypan as wedding presents for cooking. Some left over scraps of carpets edged made do as mats for the floor. As money came in, i came home after work and laid some 30x30 vinyl tiles from Kmart on the floor myself, each week buying 2-3 boxes more until a few months out the family room and kitchen and one bedroom were done. Eventually being able to afford some kitchen cupboards and a few months later installed the hotplates to the cable that had been hanging out of the wall since handover. Washing nappies in an old secondhand hoover twin tub washer and clothes drying on a rope outside in the sun.

It seems today its almost life will not go on unless there is ducted aircon, paving, landscaping, fencing, a media room, a dishwasher and a walk-in pantry and pleas in the media month on end that housing is so unaffordable.

A different time, a different era, different expectations.
Different era, but many of the same struggles for first home buyers/builders
 

SuePa

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As always, it comes down to cost.
I understand what you're saying and as travelislife said, your budget is never big enough.
I was owner/ builder so had more flexibility. In my case, I think glass was fairly comparable to tiles. Costs more to buy, but quicker to install, so saved on labour costs.
 

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