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Australian women on Qatar flight internally examined

MEL_Traveller

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I don't think there has been any proposal to name the women. Some have come forward to be interviewed, most have not so far.

In the days of social media, combined with the fact there are so few arrivals, and actually making it home is ‘news’ in itself these days, it may be an indirect consequence that the identities came out if it had been widely publicised the day after the flight arrived.
 

DC3

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In the days of social media, combined with the fact there are so few arrivals, and actually making it home is ‘news’ in itself these days, it may be an indirect consequence that the identities came out if it had been widely publicised the day after the flight arrived.
This has not happened.

Edit: “I decided it is better to scream. Silence is the real crime against humanity.”
― Nadezhda Mandelstam, Hope Against Hope
 
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DC3

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That's right. The point was that you don't need to specifically print names in order for people to be identified these days.
Anyway, I’m not optimistic of anything positive coming from all of this. A month on, and it’s still gobbledygook.
 

RAM

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That's right. The point was that you don't need to specifically print names in order for people to be identified these days.
Hmmm, not sure of your logic.

As it is now over a week since the story broke - only women who wished to have their time in the spotlight have been quoted, and other than the lady seeking support of every other woman to launch a class action - there does not appear to have been any unapproved identification.

The actions, or lack thereof by the off-duty DFAT lady would normally have had the intense focus of at least one news program over her role. However, that has not happened.
 

MEL_Traveller

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As it is now over a week since the story broke - only women who wished to have their time in the spotlight have been quoted...

That's right. The media weren't camped outside the quarantine hotel. If someone posts on social media they are coming home tomorrow on Qatar, and then the story breaks that women on last night's flight were assaulted... not hard to put two and two together. While some may not have minded that, others might.
 

DC3

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Seems like Qataris have realised the error of their ways ...
Quite a co-incidence. They realised the error of their ways, but not until after the story broke publicly, weeks on.
 
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RooFlyer

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Edit: “I decided it is better to scream. Silence is the real crime against humanity.”
― Nadezhda Mandelstam, Hope Against Hope

Nice quote. But where is the 'silence' in this case? As noted above, the incident was reported to the Australian authorities by the DFAT person as soon as the plane landed here and the passengers went into quarantine. Its been public for over a week now.

The actions, or lack thereof by the off-duty DFAT lady would normally have had the intense focus of at least one news program over her role. However, that has not happened.

You are right to be sceptical of what the media report, but given that they have reported that the DFAT lady reported the incident to the authorities "shortly after" the incident on October 2, what's your evidence of her not doing anything (as in "actions ... or lack thereof")?

A month on, and it’s still gobbledygook.

Well, there has been a formal apology by the Qatari authorities (as opposed to their first effort). Call that 'gobbledygook if you like, but I reckon its about as good a result at this stage as you'd realistically hope for. As to the Qatari justice system's follow up? I wouldn't hold my breath.
______________

And as a general comment, I wouldn't be looking out for a running commentary from DFAT as to what might be going on between the governments.

I remain surprised at the very low key reactions reported by the British and New Zealand governments over the reported treatment of their citizens.
 

kelvedon

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I wonder if, in casting such a wide net, the Qatari police actually apprehended the woman who attempted to murder of her
baby ?
 

RAM

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You are right to be sceptical of what the media report, but given that they have reported that the DFAT lady reported the incident to the authorities "shortly after" the incident on October 2, what's your evidence of her not doing anything (as in "actions ... or lack thereof")?
What she said in her seemingly one & only interview.
 

RAM

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Can't find it, can't find any extracts from it, including here :) . Can you help?
I'll do a search later (on my 'to do' list). Think it had a quote where she says she saw a crying young woman coming out of an ambulance.
 

RAM

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Can't find it, can't find any extracts from it, including here :) . Can you help?
Found it!

That was the good news....

Bad news, it is behind a paywall. I've copied about 1/12 of the article (below) so that should not breach copyright

But if you have a subscription then search for:


Marise Payne condemns Qatar airport strip search incident
A woman says she was “lucky” to escape a “terrifying” strip-search ordeal forced upon a dozen other Australian women in Qatar.
October 26, 2020 7:12pm


Australian Kim Mills was ultimately spared because of her age but said other younger Australian women were left distraught by the ordeal at Hamad International Airport on October 2.

“They told me to step forward, to go into the ambulance, and as I stepped forward another officer came round and stood in front of me and said: ‘No, no, you go, you go’,” she told Guardian Australia.

“I was the luckiest one on the whole flight because I have grey hair and I’m in my 60s. They probably looked at me and thought well, that’s impossible, it could not be her.”

Ms Mills tried to help women emerging from the ambulances who were “crying and distraught”.

“I said, ‘What’s wrong, what’s going on?’ And she told me that they’d found a baby in the bathroom at the airport and they were examining all the women,” she said
.

Now doing some 1 + 1 should = 2.

  • There was only one woman, as reported by the lady seeking to launch a class action, who was not required to be examined due to her age. Confirmed by Ms Mills herself.
  • All women, including 5 foreign Nationals flying into Australia with our closed international borders, were made to leave that flight.
  • In earlier articles it stated that the DFAT off-duty woman was not examined but did not identify her.

Ass/um/e (with all its pitfalls) that the various earlier reports of the other lady's interview are accurate (given they're recorded they should be) then Ms Mills should be the off-duty DFAT lady. Or I'm wrong.

New news that contradicts all the earlier articles based on "Ms Class Action's" interview: Ms Mills tried to help women emerging from the ambulances who were “crying and distraught”.

“I said, ‘What’s wrong, what’s going on?’ And she told me that they’d found a baby in the bathroom at the airport and they were examining all the women,” she said."

So, according to Ms Mills, someone involved in the process told at least one woman why they were to be examined. If the earlier report was accurate in one sense (where the lady said there were 6 other women from the plane in her ambulance & 6 in another) then that implies that at least six of the women were told in the ambulance.

Directly contradicts the 'nobody told the women why we were being examined' line potentially.

Now this in no way excuses the Qataris for what went on, but it does change the storyline somewhat.

As Ms Mills went into quite some detail about what she did then I also assumed all other possible actions such as identifying herself as a DFAT official & asking to speak with who is in charge or seeking Australian diplomatic assistance before any further actions taekn etc - did not happen (but could be wrong again).

Who knows the full 'factual account - we certainly don't.
 
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The NYTimes quotes an Aussie nurse called Jessica who was assaulted :
Women on Qatar Airways Flight Are Strip-Searched, Sparking Outrage in Australia
Jessica said that there were windows in the ambulance with no covers and men standing outside.

 
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MEL_Traveller

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  • There was only one woman, as reported by the lady seeking to launch a class action, who was not required to be examined due to her age. Confirmed by Ms Mills herself.
...

Directly contradicts the 'nobody told the women why we were being examined' line potentially.

There was another woman on the flight who was not examined because of her age: Woman ordered off Qatar flight thought plane was being 'hijacked'

From reading the reports it appears the 'no one told the women why' relates to the period prior to the examinations. Several reports indicate the women were told after the examination had taken place.
 

MelMel

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60 Minutes are interviewing at least one of the passengers on Sunday. If the promo is anything to go by there may be more details to come out.
 

drron

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60 Minutes are interviewing at least one of the passengers on Sunday. If the promo is anything to go by there may be more details to come out.
Though 60 minutes promos are often the only 60 seconds that actually say something relevant.Hopefully this time it may be more informative.
 

Scr77

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Currently on 60 minutes. A victim has explained what happened. Now they are about to look at Qatari culture.
 
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