Airport security confiscated an empty water bottle

Ancient history now, but ISTR that the original rationale was that evil-doers might use the empty bottle to combine their liquid bomb ingredients from smaller, compliant containers.
There never was a rationale for any part of this liquid ban. TSA, one of the groups that pushed for the nonsense to begin with, allows empty water bottles.
 
The Frequent Flyer Concierge team takes the hard work out of finding reward seat availability. Using their expert knowledge and specialised tools, they'll help you book a great trip that maximises the value for your points.

AFF Supporters can remove this and all advertisements

Ancient history now, but ISTR that the original rationale was that evil-doers might use the empty bottle to combine their liquid bomb ingredients from smaller, compliant containers.
Then they can pour the water out from the bottle they give you onboard and use that ?!
 
Sponsored Post

Struggling to use your Frequent Flyer Points?

Frequent Flyer Concierge takes the hard work out of finding award availability and redeeming your frequent flyer or credit card points for flights.

Using their expert knowledge and specialised tools, the Frequent Flyer Concierge team at Frequent Flyer Concierge will help you book a great trip that maximises the value for your points.

For years we have flown back to Oz from either the US or Hong Kong with our 1 litre metal water bottles tucked into our backpack and have never had a problem...Go figure !!
 
For years we have flown back to Oz from either the US or Hong Kong with our 1 litre metal water bottles tucked into our backpack and have never had a problem...Go figure !!
We always have the kids water bottles with us, sometimes they don't even get emptied and no one seems to care 🤷‍♀️
 
Meanwhile, i walked through syd intl main security with half a bottle of water in my L bottle. I remember reading that the new machines (the one that you keep everything in your bags) can detect what liquid it is as well. Security didn't bat an eyelid.
 
There never was a rationale for any part of this liquid ban. TSA, one of the groups that pushed for the nonsense to begin with, allows empty water bottles.
There's a loophole large enough to drive a truck through anyway. There's an exemption for saline for medical purposes (like contact lenses) so as long as your water bottle has a sticker on it saying "Contact lens fluid" then it's totally permitted even when it's full of liquid.
 
We lost our empty water bottles in DPS earlier this year. Makes zero sense but then again I wouldn't expect anything related to perceived security to make any sense.

We've got through SIN, BKK and CNX security with full water bottle in daughters carry-on and it's been allowed. Think we were questioned once and we mentioned it's for daughter and they allowed it through.

Perceived safety. Justifies the obscene amounts spent on airport security.
 
Both Australia and NZ have domestic wine production/wine tourism and no liquid rules domestically. Coincidence?
Pretty much a coincidence, yep.

The liquids thing happened internationally when a few very grumpy chaps flew a couple of planes’ worth of jet-fuel into some well known skyscrapers, often referred-to as 11/9. Introducing it domestically was always going to be silly, given how silly it was internationally …
 
Pretty much a coincidence, yep.

The liquids thing happened internationally when a few very grumpy chaps flew a couple of planes’ worth of jet-fuel into some well known skyscrapers, often referred-to as 11/9. Introducing it domestically was always going to be silly, given how silly it was internationally …
No, it wasn't. It started some time after that when UK officials "discovered" a plot (which never out of planning, much less into any sort of testing) which reportedly was to use liquid explosives (which where inherently unstable and had no chance of getting to an airport in the first place) disguised as drinks to target a number of trans Atlantic flights to the US.

The UK went crazy and banned all carry on bags for a few days before deciding on liquid limits.
The US also went crazy and banned all liquids on board for a few days (including drinks served on board) before agreeing to the liquid limits.

I had flown UK-US a week before and was in DC the day the news came through with a flight to FL the next day.

Japan had liquid scanning machines in place not long after and offered to give them to the US (and put an end to the liquid stupidity). The US refused because they wanted a US made system for such scanning.
 
No, it wasn't. It started some time after that when UK officials "discovered" a plot (which never out of planning, much less into any sort of testing) which reportedly was to use liquid explosives (which where inherently unstable and had no chance of getting to an airport in the first place) disguised as drinks to target a number of trans Atlantic flights to the US.

The UK went crazy and banned all carry on bags for a few days before deciding on liquid limits.
The US also went crazy and banned all liquids on board for a few days (including drinks served on board) before agreeing to the liquid limits.

I had flown UK-US a week before and was in DC the day the news came through with a flight to FL the next day.

Japan had liquid scanning machines in place not long after and offered to give them to the US (and put an end to the liquid stupidity). The US refused because they wanted a US made system for such scanning.
The whole scare was rediculous in the first place. The idea that a “terrorist” could manufacture TATP explosives in the plane bathroom sink from liquid in bottles was fanciful at best.
 
The liquids thing happened internationally.....
No -i believe later around 2006 when AlQaeda info was uncovered bythe Germans

UK officials "discovered" a plot
It was actually the Germans who discovered it and assisted the UK counterparts to foil a plot relating to the use of coloured hydrogen peroxide in rosewater bottles.

There's an exemption for saline for medical purposes (like contact lenses)
There was one incident involving Phillipine airlines PR 434 back in 1994 (pre 9/11) where nitroglycerin was hidden in Contact lens fluid labelled bottles under a seat. The explosion punched a hole in the aircraft cabin floor an severed some flight controls, and killed the innocent passenger sitting in the seat

The terrorist only need to get one bottle in ...., well, filled with the explosive substance
 
Last edited:
I almost always carry a bottle of water with me when I travel. When clearing international airport security, I know you can't have more than 100mL of liquids so I usually just drink or empty the bottle before going through security, then fill it up with drinking water after security, if possible. I know many other people do the same and many airports even provide drinking water taps after security for this purpose. I never had a problem... until yesterday.

I was boarding LA801 at SCL and, as is common on long-haul flights bound for Australia, there was an additional bag check in the aerobridge as we boarded the plane. The security official immediately noticed my empty plastic water bottle and confiscated it. She claimed it wasn't allowed. I'm not quite sure why - it was an empty, transparent 500mL bottle.

Anyone experienced this before? It seemed pretty ridiculous to me, but did the security officer have a point?
Over officious I would say. We often carry an empty and never been challenged to and out of Australia.
mg transparent cream container confiscated (a mere 18mg over the 100) Had a very small perspirant spray confiscated in Melbourne recently
 
They just don't like you selling bottles of fresh Chile air
I almost always carry a bottle of water with me when I travel. When clearing international airport security, I know you can't have more than 100mL of liquids so I usually just drink or empty the bottle before going through security, then fill it up with drinking water after security, if possible. I know many other people do the same and many airports even provide drinking water taps after security for this purpose. I never had a problem... until yesterday.

I was boarding LA801 at SCL and, as is common on long-haul flights bound for Australia, there was an additional bag check in the aerobridge as we boarded the plane. The security official immediately noticed my empty plastic water bottle and confiscated it. She claimed it wasn't allowed. I'm not quite sure why - it was an empty, transparent 500mL bottle.

Anyone experienced this before? It seemed pretty ridiculous to me, but did the security officer have a point?
I wouldn't be surprised considering SYD banned me from taking laundry pods the second time I entered. The other time it was dishwashing pods. The rules clearly state that they are allowed. Time to file a ACCC complaint.
 
They just don't like you selling bottles of fresh Chile air

I wouldn't be surprised considering SYD banned me from taking laundry pods the second time I entered. The other time it was dishwashing pods. The rules clearly state that they are allowed. Time to file a ACCC complaint.
Wouldn't have though the ACCC was the airport security regulator.
 
I had almost the same situation at SCL too on the air bridge.

I tried to question it but one security staff said they didn't understand English when I asked why they needed to confiscate an empty bottle and there were no LATAM staff nearby.
 

Become an AFF member!

Join Australian Frequent Flyer (AFF) for free and enjoy a better viewing experience, as well as full participation on our community forums.

AFF members can also access our Frequent Flyer Training courses, and upgrade to enjoy lots of other benefits and discounts!

AFF forum abbreviations

Wondering about Y, J or any of the other abbreviations used on our forum?

Check out our guide to common AFF acronyms & abbreviations.

Staff online

  • NM
    Enthusiast
Back
Top