TK6491 crashes near FRU | Australian Frequent Flyer
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TK6491 crashes near FRU

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defurax

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I read on BBC that a TK 747 freighter just crashed near FRU, killing ~20 people.

Looking at FR24, it says that the plane landed...the last data point is 2375 ft of altitude (Wiki says the runway at FRU is at an elevation of 2,090 ft).

Bad weather is suggested as a possible cause.
 

docjames

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jb747

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Assuming the FR24 data is correct, he crosses the normal touchdown point at 175 kts ground speed (very fast) and 2,700'. That runway's threshold elevation is 2,055', which implies that he's over 600 feet high.

The last FR24 data point gives an altitude of 2,375', so if we assume that's the FR reading at a real 2,055', then he's still about 325' high. Nominally, a normal approach is 300' per mile, so from the height alone you end up about a mile long. Add the excess speed, and I don't think stopping was ever likely.
 
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moa999

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ACT Airlines is a Turkish cargo operator, from Wikipedia appears that China's Hainan Airlines owns 49%.

Plane was wet leased to TK, so TK code, but ACT plane and crew
 

jb747

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Assuming the FR24 data is correct, he crosses the normal touchdown point at 175 kts ground speed (very fast) and 2,700'. That runway's threshold elevation is 2,055', which implies that he's over 600 feet high.

The last FR24 data point gives an altitude of 2,375', so if we assume that's the FR reading at a real 2,055', then he's still about 325' high. Nominally, a normal approach is 300' per mile, so from the height alone you end up about a mile long. Add the excess speed, and I don't think stopping was ever likely.
FR24s numbers didn't really make a lot of sense, in that being so high, the aircraft would never have been on the glideslope at all. Apparently they aren't corrected for QNH, so that explains about 300' of the difference. Additionally, the low temperature at the time, brings into play yet another altimeter error, basically of 200'. That makes the aircraft about 500' lower than the FR altitudes, and so makes much more sense. The speed is still high, but now the altitude is only slightly so.
 
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