Login Now to remove this and all advertisements (GOLD and SILVER members)
Not a member? Register Now for free

Getting off Caribbean cruise early

Status
Not open for further replies.

Mark3000

Active Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2014
Messages
656
Points
10
We are going on a Royal Caribbean Cruise from Florida through the Caribbean and Mexico and back to Florida.
We would like to get off at the last stop, which is Cozumel in Mexico.

Does anyone know if this would violate US Cabotage laws.
I know for example you cannot get off at a different US port, but how about Mexico?

The Royal Caribbean website is confusing and states:
If a passenger (as listed on a vessel passenger manifest) embarks in a U.S. port and the vessel calls in a nearby foreign port (such as Ensenada, Grand Cayman and Nassau) and then returns to the U.S., the person must disembark in the same U.S. port. A passenger who embarks and disembarks in two different U.S. ports (such as Los Angeles and San Diego) would result in the carrier (not the violator) being fined. The vessel must call in a distant foreign port before the U.S. embarkation and disembarkation ports can differ. The nearest distant foreign ports are in or off the coast of South America. If either the passenger's embarkation port or disembarkation port is in a foreign country, then the provisions of this cabotage law do not apply. Nor do they apply in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.
 

Pushka

Enthusiast
Joined
Jan 26, 2011
Messages
24,454
Points
2,745
The USA has all these weird laws that relate to US and non US stops. Then there is another issue with getting off a cruise early except in emergency. The port you wish to exit at may not have immigration processing available if departing a cruise (as opposed to transiting for the day)

I'd join Cruise Critic and post there. Full of USA experienced cruisers.
 

Mark3000

Active Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2014
Messages
656
Points
10
The USA has all these weird laws that relate to US and non US stops. Then there is another issue with getting off a cruise early except in emergency. The port you wish to exit at may not have immigration processing available if departing a cruise (as opposed to transiting for the day)

I'd join Cruise Critic and post there. Full of USA experienced cruisers.
Thanks so much Pushka, cruise Critic was a great idea. I found this in the posts:

U.S. GAO - Maritime Law Exemption: Exemption Provides Limited Competitive Advantage, but Barriers to Further Entry under U.S. Flag Remain
voyages by foreign vessels between two U.S. ports that include a distant foreign port, and round trip voyages from U.S. ports that include a nearby foreign port and other U.S. ports, do not violate the PVSA.

It gets very complicated, what is a distant foreign port and it depends whether you get off in a different US city or overseas, but for my purposes, since we are on a round trip US cruise, stop in a foreign port and are planning to get off in a different foreign port, we should be fine. If we wanted to get off in a different US city than we embarked on, we would not be allowed.
 
Get paid up to 25% in real cash from your everyday purchases from leading companies such as Virgin Australia, Booking.com, Woolworths, Coles, Apple, Microsoft and much more. Free to join and no catches!

Recommended by the Australian Frequent Flyer
Status
Not open for further replies.

Community Statistics

Threads
86,568
Messages
2,098,442
Members
53,895
Latest member
louie-m

Currently Active Users

Top