Entering the US (LAX) with US Citizen - which line to use

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mjt57

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How would they know you are not married? A different surname is no indication and who is to say you must wear a ring?

In our case, other than carrying the marriage certificate with us, she's on my private health insurance card, we live at the same address as indicated on our drivers' licences and if we have to we'll fire up mobile internet banking (provided that we have a WIFI signal) and show them our names on the account.
 

knightman7

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Fwiw, whenever I fly into LAX with my cousin who is a US citizen, I always go with her to the US line and have never had a problem.
 

knightman7

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Yeah, so if I can use the US citizens line with my cousin, I would imagine that the OP can have the US line with his wife with no problem.
 

mjt57

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Yeah, so if I can use the US citizens line with my cousin, I would imagine that the OP can have the US line with his wife with no problem.
Fingers crossed. I'll find out on Friday night our time, actually.

Still would like to know why the official at JFK was insistant that I had to enter the foreigners line while my wife got directed to the US citz line.
 

knightman7

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I guess the key is to not ask. I give my cousin my passport, and she hands them over together to the immigration agent. I honestly never really put much thought into it before now as I assumed that was normal.
 

GazzaOak

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In short, its can be no, but however there can be rare cases.

In Bangkok, me and my mum were directed to the Thai passport queue because my mum has both thai and aussie passport.
 

mjt57

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Well, got to the area where my wife and I were directed to the different lines. I didn't bother questioning it as the line for "Visitors" was mercifully short. Through in about 20-30 mins.

My wife got through quickly, and was told by the officer that she saw that I could've been processed by him.

Grrr...

Anyway, got through, plenty of time to get our connecting Delta flight to JFK.
 

defurax

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Well, got to the area where my wife and I were directed to the different lines. I didn't bother questioning it as the line for "Visitors" was mercifully short. Through in about 20-30 mins.

My wife got through quickly, and was told by the officer that she saw that I could've been processed by him.

Grrr...

Anyway, got through, plenty of time to get our connecting Delta flight to JFK.

Had you filled two custom/immigration forms?
 

TomVexille

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Well, got to the area where my wife and I were directed to the different lines. I didn't bother questioning it as the line for "Visitors" was mercifully short. Through in about 20-30 mins.

My wife got through quickly, and was told by the officer that she saw that I could've been processed by him.

Grrr...

Anyway, got through, plenty of time to get our connecting Delta flight to JFK.

Good to hear it worked out okay in the end.
 

mjt57

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Had you filled two custom/immigration forms?
Yes, as my wife has her family name still. Maybe next time she'll have it changed so we use the one form.

But the woman directing us to the separate lines didn't see our forms.
 
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defurax

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Yes, as my wife has her family name still. Maybe next time she'll have it changed so we use the one form.

But the woman directing us to the separate lines didn't see our forms.

Having the same last name has nothing to do with it. My wife and I have different surnames and we fill a single form. As I mentioned here before, in Scandinavian countries for example it is getting extremely rare for spouse to change their name after getting married.
Though, now that I have Global Entry I try to avoid travelling with my wife so I don't have to wait in line with her:D
 

TomVexille

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Yes, as my wife has her family name still. Maybe next time she'll have it changed so we use the one form.

But the woman directing us to the separate lines didn't see our forms.

I would think you would be fine with one form as you are a family
 

mjt57

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Having the same last name has nothing to do with it. My wife and I have different surnames and we fill a single form. As I mentioned here before, in Scandinavian countries for example it is getting extremely rare for spouse to change their name after getting married.
Though, now that I have Global Entry I try to avoid travelling with my wife so I don't have to wait in line with her:D

Unfortunately this isn't the case for entry into the US. The Immigration form specifically states that it's for families with the same surname. The airline people handing out the cards also asked this question.
 

defurax

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Unfortunately this isn't the case for entry into the US. The Immigration form specifically states that it's for families with the same surname. The airline people handing out the cards also asked this question.

I posted the immigration form at post #10. No requirement to have the same last name (or first name for that matter...)
Just to convince you, there is a Canadian province called Québec and since 1994 women do not legally take their husbands name following a change in the civil code. Millions of Quebecers go to the US each year and I can assure you that "family" doesn't mean sharing the same last name.
 
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Yes, as my wife has her family name still. Maybe next time she'll have it changed so we use the one form.

But the woman directing us to the separate lines didn't see our forms.

Next time, just say yes, US Citizens...
 

defurax

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Here is the official answer, straight from US CBP website.

[h=3]Who is eligible to file a joint or family declaration on a CBP Form 6059B?[/h]A joint or family declaration can be filed on a CBP Form 6059B by persons who meet the following three conditions:
1. Are related by blood, marriage, or adoption;
2. Lived together in one household at their last permanent residence; and
3. Intend to live together in one household after their arrival in the United States.
This is in accordance with 19CFR148.34(b).
For more information about the Declaration Form 6059B, including a sample and instructions on how to complete the form click here.
Effective January 17, 2014, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) broadened the definition of "members of a family residing in one household" to include long-term same-sex couples and other domestic relationships. Visit cbp.gov/travel for more information.
"Domestic relationship" would be defined to include:
- foster children, stepchildren, half-siblings, legal wards, other dependents, and individuals with an in loco parentis or guardianship relationship;
- two adults who are in a committed relationship including, but not limited to, long-term companions and couples in civil unions or domestic partnerships where the partners are financially interdependent, and are not married to, or a partner of, anyone else.

https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/de...int-or-family-declaration-on-a-cbp-form-6059b
 

blackcat20

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Here is the official answer, straight from US CBP website.

Who is eligible to file a joint or family declaration on a CBP Form 6059B?

A joint or family declaration can be filed on a CBP Form 6059B by persons who meet the following three conditions:
1. Are related by blood, marriage, or adoption;
2. Lived together in one household at their last permanent residence; and
3. Intend to live together in one household after their arrival in the United States.
This is in accordance with 19CFR148.34(b).
For more information about the Declaration Form 6059B, including a sample and instructions on how to complete the form click here.
Effective January 17, 2014, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) broadened the definition of "members of a family residing in one household" to include long-term same-sex couples and other domestic relationships. Visit cbp.gov/travel for more information.
"Domestic relationship" would be defined to include:
- foster children, stepchildren, half-siblings, legal wards, other dependents, and individuals with an in loco parentis or guardianship relationship;
- two adults who are in a committed relationship including, but not limited to, long-term companions and couples in civil unions or domestic partnerships where the partners are financially interdependent, and are not married to, or a partner of, anyone else.

https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/de...int-or-family-declaration-on-a-cbp-form-6059b

But does that cover the scenario of one being a US citizen and one not?
 
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