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Duty Free Smokes

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DrA

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I don't smoke, but I said I'd ask...

I've got 2 family members travelling from the UK to visit me, and they want to know if there's any legal way to get more than one packet of cigarettes each duty free into Australia. They're travelling together, so would be entitled to 1 packet (50 cigs) each I believe? They're used to being allowed to bring a carton, not just a single pack.

I'm guessing that they're probably stuck? Thought I'd ask the crowd just in case.

Thanks :)
 

harvyk

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They could always pay duty on the extra ciggies (assuming the extra didn't fall foul of our import laws such as packaging). Otherwise no, they are limited to 50 each.
 

DrA

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They could always pay duty on the extra ciggies (assuming the extra didn't fall foul of our import laws such as packaging). Otherwise no, they are limited to 50 each.
Figured as much. Thanks :)
 

MEL_Traveller

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I don't smoke, but I said I'd ask...

I've got 2 family members travelling from the UK to visit me, and they want to know if there's any legal way to get more than one packet of cigarettes each duty free into Australia. They're travelling together, so would be entitled to 1 packet (50 cigs) each I believe? They're used to being allowed to bring a carton, not just a single pack.

I'm guessing that they're probably stuck? Thought I'd ask the crowd just in case.

Thanks :)
Adult passengers arriving into Australia are entitled to bring 50 cigarettes each - so 100 for two pax.

Depending where they are transiting, how long they are staying, and how much they smoke, it will likely be a fair bit cheaper for them to buy cartons and pay the import duty than buying them here.

Import duty is currently ~40c per stick, plus GST. Paying duty is quick and easy. Savings can be upwards of $40-50 per carton imported vs retail in Australia. however - this entirely depends on where the cartons are bought duty free... Asia is probably one of the best places. Buying them on arrival and paying the duty would negate the purpose (and in fact make them more expensive than retail in the shops).

There is no requirement for cigarettes to comply with Australian packaging laws provided they are for personal use.
 
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DrA

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Adult passengers arriving into Australia are entitled to bring 50 cigarettes each - so 100 for two pax.

Depending where they are transiting, how long they are staying, and how much they smoke, it will likely be a fair bit cheaper for them to buy cartons and pay the import duty than buying them here.

Import duty is currently ~40c per stick, plus GST. Paying duty is quick and easy. Savings can be upwards of $40-50 per carton imported vs retail in Australia. however - this entirely depends on where the cartons are bought duty free... Asia is probably one of the best places. Buying them on arrival and paying the duty would negate the purpose (and in fact make them more expensive than retail in the shops).

There is no requirement for cigarettes to comply with Australian packaging laws provided they are for personal use.
Flying from LHR, and transiting in SIN, so presumably would be purchased in SIN. I'll let them know though :)
 

MEL_Traveller

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Flying from LHR, and transiting in SIN, so presumably would be purchased in SIN. I'll let them know though :)
SIN is cheap for cigarettes! They will be advised by the DF shop in SIN that the allowance for Australia is only 50 cigarettes - they only need tell the staff they are going to pay the duty on arrival in Australia and they will be good to go (syaff understand the concept and there has never been a problem)
 
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show them the fire retardant that's added these days to cigarettes to a) stop butt flicked fires and b) kill voters faster.

chop chop is available from any organised crime syndicate, except the disorganised ones in Parliament House:(
 

JohnK

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You are allowed to bring in 1 packet of cigarettes or 1 pouch of tobacco (50gms) duty free.

You are also allowed to carry another packet/pouch that is opened on your person.

I purchased a pack of 5 tobacco pouches duty free and leave in Thailand with my fiancee. I then bring back 1 opened tobacco pouch and purchase another duty free on my return.

It was much better when you could bring back 5 tobacco pouches. I don't smoke but it is a small present for dad as the retail price is more than double the duty free price.
 

MEL_Traveller

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You are allowed to bring in 1 packet of cigarettes or 1 pouch of tobacco (50gms) duty free.

You are also allowed to carry another packet/pouch that is opened on your person.
You are allowed 50 cigarettes - so up to 2.5 standard international packs or 5 smaller packs of 10 (which are rare).

There is no additional allowance under the rules for any opened packet... although customs may decide not to collect duty on that packet if they choose. An open packet in excess of 50 cigarettes must be declared as being in excess of your duty free allowance.
 

markis10

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There is no additional allowance under the rules for any opened packet... although customs may decide not to collect duty on that packet if they choose. An open packet in excess of 50 cigarettes must be declared as being in excess of your duty free allowance.
Spot on, just like alcohol an opened package makes no difference, except in the context that the opened containers capacity is assessed as part of your allowance. So an almost empty 50 pack is still counted as 50, and an almost empty 1L bottle is counted as 1L.
 

MEL_Traveller

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Spot on, just like alcohol an opened package makes no difference, except in the context that the opened containers capacity is assessed as part of your allowance. So an almost empty 50 pack is still counted as 50, and an almost empty 1L bottle is counted as 1L.
Can you expand on that a little (or have a link)? Are you talking about a situation where a passenger has concealed cigarettes or alcohol?
 

markis10

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Can you expand on that a little (or have a link)? Are you talking about a situation where a passenger has concealed cigarettes or alcohol?
Its applicable for declarations openly made or concealed. Where goods are in their original packaging, an open container will be counted as full regardless of its actual quantity of goods unless its empty, according to some customs officers who gave me a warning :oops:
 

MEL_Traveller

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Its applicable for declarations openly made or concealed. Where goods are in their original packaging, an open container will be counted as full regardless of its actual quantity of goods unless its empty, according to some customs officers who gave me a warning :oops:
thats interesting... I'd be interested to see where they came up with that one from!

generally customs officers will will 'waive' an open pack. but now I'm wondering what the actual law is. (I guess it kind of makes sense for alcohol... for which a quantity might be harder to deeming than counting an actual cigarette)
 

markis10

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thats interesting... I'd be interested to see where they came up with that one from!

generally customs officers will will 'waive' an open pack. but now I'm wondering what the actual law is. (I guess it kind of makes sense for alcohol... for which a quantity might be harder to deeming than counting an actual cigarette)
I believe its up to the CEO and published directions on valuation when it comes to the law, although beer was covered specifically in changes to the act tabled in 1989

if the volume of the contents of the
container is indicated on a label printed on, or attached to, the container and the actual volume of the contents of the container does not exceed 101.5% of the volume so indicated--the volume so indicated;
.

Where the amount is less than labelled, customs are only permitted to make an allowance if its due to a manufacturing process.
 

JohnK

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thats interesting... I'd be interested to see where they came up with that one from!

generally customs officers will will 'waive' an open pack. but now I'm wondering what the actual law is. (I guess it kind of makes sense for alcohol... for which a quantity might be harder to deeming than counting an actual cigarette)
I wouldn't worry too much.

They have waived open packs as they are not duty free.

They have also waived miniature bottles of alcohol. "From hotel mini bar?" was the remark.
 
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