Login Now to remove this and all advertisements (GOLD and SILVER members)
Not a member? Register Now for free

aircraft certification?

Status
Not open for further replies.

wandering_fred

Established Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2006
Messages
2,574
Flights
My Map
One of my "I wonder why" questions...

Aircraft manufacturers have to certify new aircraft before they are allowed to enter commercial service. One of the steps involved is a demonstration "test" that a full load of passengers can exit the plane within a relatively short period of time (90 seconds comes to mind).

On many of my trans-Pacific trips, normally there is a significant number of wheel chairs lined up in the jetway as I make my out. I would speculate if that number of people (who actually do need wheel chair assistance) were to be included in the certification processing tests, most airliners would fail the test. And if any of these people are seated in aisle seats, passengers closer to the windows would be "disadvantaged. The same would potentially be true with a "passenger of size" in the aisle seat.

An example of where this sort of testing has caused changes is that most economy rows (ie three seats) can legally only include ONE lap child as otherwise there would be an insufficient number of oxygen masks.

Anyone with actual knowledge of how the rules are actually implemented to "overlook" this potential issue?

Happy wandering

Fred
 

markis10

Veteran Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2004
Messages
30,449
The certification tests have taken into account people with disabilities in the past, and is the reason why only aisle seats are to be used, as it was found to take up to 50% of the time just getting to the aisle if your movement limited? Work is ongoing, at present certification tests must have a set minimum percentage if different ages and sex, and there is work being done to look closer at movement limited impairments.

http://easa.europa.eu/system/files/dfu/EASA 2008.C.25 Final report Issue 1.1.pdf
 

MEL_Traveller

Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 27, 2005
Messages
21,593
On many of my trans-Pacific trips, normally there is a significant number of wheel chairs lined up in the jetway as I make my out.
I have noticed this as well, and suspect by far the majority of those chairs are simply to expedite immigration and customs in the USA. I have a feeling if there was actually an emergency, most of those pax would be fully able to get themselves out without assistance.

My Aisiana flight to ORD had 27 wheelchairs on arrival. I saw 1 wheelchair going on. Same with my CX flight a couple months ago into SFO.
 

MrHyde

Member
Joined
May 16, 2008
Messages
412
Flights
My Map
Isn't there also a limit to how many movement impaired people can be on a single flight. I seem to remember reading about cases of disabled people being denied boarding because they did not inform the airline prior and then the airline could not carry them due to exceeded some number. Same with number of infants on board and availability of child seat belts.
 

wandering_fred

Established Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2006
Messages
2,574
Flights
My Map
I sort of agree with MEL_traveler as to the true nature of most of the wheel chair requests.
OTOH I can't see any objective study not concluding that some limit to the number of "limited movement" passengers would not be required for "safe" operation. I wonder how the European study will clash with the ADA (disability access) rules in the USA.

And on the other side of the issue, while Mrs. WF was waiting for a knee replacement, she could still move around but had no desire to walk 500 meters in a terminal building.

May we live in interesting times while wandering

Fred
 

MEL_Traveller

Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 27, 2005
Messages
21,593
I thought there was a distinction between pax who could move on their own accord (walk to/from or in the aircraft) vs those who could not make their way onto the aircraft by themselves at all?

My understanding was that there may be a limit to the latter category, but not to the first?

edited: I just found this... it doesn't seem to indicate/propose a maximum. But it's a long document and I've only scanned it: http://easa.europa.eu/system/files/dfu/rulemaking-docs-npa-2014-NPA-2014-01.pdf
 
Last edited:
The Qantas Premier Platinum Card delivers up to 100k Qantas Points, 75 bonus Status Credits, complimentary lounge invitations and travel insurance. All this with a reduced first-year annual fee of $199.

Recommended by the Australian Frequent Flyer
Status
Not open for further replies.

Community Statistics

Threads
86,423
Messages
2,088,875
Members
53,781
Latest member
khoobh16
Top