SQ321 LHR-SIN Encountered Severe Turbulence [At least 1 Fatality and 30 Injured]

Of course, they just HAVE to. “Climate armageddon”- speaking of cry wolf :rolleyes:
Depends on which forest you wander in. Some of them may have real wolves.

When I grew up, it was obvious that something's afoot. Especially the character of winters changed. When you look the first two diagrams on this page, they lead you you to the self-evident question: why? What's triggered such a change? The follow-on questions are what else is changing and what now?

We could talk all night about the potential causes or long-term variations (millions of years) but that might be much better suited to a lounge with your favourite drink instead of here (in this thread, perhaps we need a 'Aviation and climate' thread somewhere).
 
Not sure if this was covered in earlier discussion about "the plunge", but FR24 had some more detailed tracking info on their blog, and reiterated that it was a standard rate of descent initiated by the pilots after the period of severe turbulence.
 
I remember reading some years ago that we are fortunate that Australian skies are quite mild in terms of turbulence because of large land mass and no high mountain ranges.

@jb747 and others, is this true.
 
Not sure if this was covered in earlier discussion about "the plunge", but FR24 had some more detailed tracking info on their blog, and reiterated that it was a standard rate of descent initiated by the pilots after the period of severe turbulence.
That was obvious to everyone except the media from the moment this event was reported.
 
I flew MEL-DOH last night on QR. We hit some turbulence early on and the seatbelt sign stayed on for 75% of the 13.5 hour flight. Cabin crew operated as normal and seemed surprised that I wasn't leaving my seat with the sign on.
 
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I remember reading some years ago that we are fortunate that Australian skies are quite mild in terms of turbulence because of large land mass and no high mountain ranges.

@jb747 and others, is this true.
Not really. For sure the incidence of some particular types of weather can differ around the world, but our skies aren’t particularly mild, compared to other places. What we don’t have anything much of, is standing wave. Saw them a fair bit over Europe, and they give a bit of a roller coaster ride. They do sometimes show up to the east of the Dividing Range.

Most CAT is from the mixing of layers of air, especially fast moving layers. That can happen anywhere, and is more related to where those fast moving layers are than anything else. Think east of Perth, or west of the US mainland. Also south of Japan. You can normally descend out of these, but at a cost in fuel burn. Rarely, you can climb over them.

The sort of mechanical turbulence that you’re thinking of was evident on the routes closest to the Himalayas, but that’s mostly China into the various ‘stans, including Russiastan.

This event was not CAT. I’m sure it will come back to how the radar was being operated, and what choices they were making based on the radar returns.
 
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I actually had to google that up

31 October 2000 – Singapore Airlines Flight 006, a Boeing 747-400, attempted to take off on the wrong runway...It collided with the construction equipment that was parked on a closed runway, killing 83 of the 179 onboard and injuring a further 71 people. This was the first fatal accident involving a Singapore Airlines aircraft. The aircraft 9V-SPK was painted in a "Tropical" promotional livery at the time of the accident. The only other aircraft painted with the promotional livery, another 747-400 registered 9V-SPL, was immediately removed from service and repainted with standard Singapore Airlines livery.


EDIT: How in the world do you attempt to take off on a wrong runway and collide with an immobile construction equipment is beyond my imagination🫥🫥
Ironically this aircraft is also in a special Star Alliance livery
 
I flew MEL-DOH last night on QR. We hit some turbulence early on and the seatbelt sign stayed on for 75% of the 13.5 hour flight. Cabin crew operated as normal and seemed surprised that I wasn't leaving my seat with the sign on.
Was there any issue with passengers needing to leave their seats to use the bathrooms whilst the seatbelt sign was on?
 

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