NBN Discussion

SYD

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All these technical people on here might be able to answer my question. I rang Aussie BB recently because my broadband was becoming painfully slow. They said yep we'll set up another one for you and it has worked fine ever since. Problem is the old one was 2.4GHz and the new one is 5 and my printer isn't capable of connecting to the 5 so I have to disconnect from one wifi, reconnect to the old one, print and then reverse.

Is there an alternative to having to do that?
Do you have a make and model for the new modem/wifi? It should be at least dual band (2.4GHz and 5GHz).
 

VPS

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Do you have a make and model for the new modem/wifi? It should be at least dual band (2.4GHz and 5GHz).
It's not a new modem they just set a new wifi so I can now see both so it is obviously dual band - eg abc is 2.4 and def is 5
 

SYD

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It's not a new modem they just set a new wifi so I can now see both so it is obviously dual band - eg abc is 2.4 and def is 5
Possibly a password / pairing issue. Is there a WPS button you can push to try and re-pair the printer?
 
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TheRealTMA

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Do you have a make and model for the new modem/wifi? It should be at least dual band (2.4GHz and 5GHz).
That was my thought. All wifi devices are dual band so one can still connect to 2.4 devices.
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It's not a new modem they just set a new wifi so I can now see both so it is obviously dual band - eg abc is 2.4 and def is 5
Reset the printer connection details.
 
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Some wireless access points can use the same SSID (network name) and authentication mechanism across both 2.4 and 5GHz radios, and devices will connect to whichever they think is best. In such cases, the devices are logically connected to the same "network", using the same IP address details (subnet, default gateway etc). In this case, the printer can connect at 2.4GHz and a laptop at 5GHz and they will see each other as present on the same "network".

But some wireless access points don't permit the use of the same SSID on different bands. So if this is the case for your access point, you will see two different "networks" available to a dual-band device. And these networks may be established using different network parameters such as IP subnet, gateway etc. If that is the case then its possible or even likely that devices connected to one network won't "see" devices connected to the other.

So ultimately it may come down to the capabilities of the actual device providing the wireless LAN functions in your home.
 

VPS

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Some wireless access points can use the same SSID (network name) and authentication mechanism across both 2.4 and 5GHz radios, and devices will connect to whichever they think is best. In such cases, the devices are logically connected to the same "network", using the same IP address details (subnet, default gateway etc). In this case, the printer can connect at 2.4GHz and a laptop at 5GHz and they will see each other as present on the same "network".

But some wireless access points don't permit the use of the same SSID on different bands. So if this is the case for your access point, you will see two different "networks" available to a dual-band device. And these networks may be established using different network parameters such as IP subnet, gateway etc. If that is the case then its possible or even likely that devices connected to one network won't "see" devices connected to the other.

So ultimately it may come down to the capabilities of the actual device providing the wireless LAN functions in your home.
thanks - I've worked it out now. Even if the printer was on it was saying offline but if I click on it seems to change to network and available so all good.

Thanks for all the advice
 

TheRealTMA

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Telstra NBN in western suburbs of Brisbane has been annoying over the last week. Sites slow to respond or repoer no connection. Classic symptoms and related to the Telstra DNS.

Changing the DNS to Google 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.8.4 solves the issue.
 

Daver6

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TheRealTMA

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Hellstra...
Not at all. Very happy with them overall. Occasional issue but 300Mbps and auto-fallback to 4G major outrage or if idiots runs into the wires.
Anyone using their provider's DNS servers is just asking for certain sites to be blocked. Personally I use Cloudflare 1.1.1.1 — the Internet’s Fastest, Privacy-First DNS Resolver
Yes cloudfare is an option as well. Haven’t found any blocked yet. Will be interested to see.
 

TheRealTMA

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@Daver6 Curious. What sites does google dns block?

ref Google question. The except is not explained.

”Google Public DNS is purely a DNS resolution and caching server; it does not perform any blocking or filtering of any kind, except that it may not resolve certain domains in extraordinary cases if we believe this is necessary to protect Google's users from security threats.”


ref: cloudfare. Interesting they have family friendly DNS. Not for me but maybe useful for some.

 

Guvner

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Is there a reason you wouldn't use a local DNS server/service (local cache) forwarded to Cloudfare as Primary upstream and a non-Cloudfare DNS server as Secondary? Most users visit the same websites over and over, a cached DNS does the job, gives you more control/privacy and enables a few layers of redundancy.
 

straitman

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Is there a reason you wouldn't use a local DNS server/service (local cache) forwarded to Cloudfare as Primary upstream and a non-Cloudfare DNS server as Secondary? Most users visit the same websites over and over, a cached DNS does the job, gives you more control/privacy and enables a few layers of redundancy.
Wow. What language was that?
 

TheRealTMA

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Is there a reason you wouldn't use a local DNS server/service (local cache) forwarded to Cloudfare as Primary upstream and a non-Cloudfare DNS server as Secondary? Most users visit the same websites over and over, a cached DNS does the job, gives you more control/privacy and enables a few layers of redundancy.
No that would be ok. Also you could use Cloudfare as primary and Google as secondary. But this is for name recognition DNS not the web cache so there’s no real point. Cloudfare and Google DNs are gereraliy in the <15ms resolution. Most likely your local DNS would use Cloudfare etc as their upstream DNS anyway.
 

Daver6

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@Daver6 Curious. What sites does google dns block?

ref Google question. The except is not explained.

”Google Public DNS is purely a DNS resolution and caching server; it does not perform any blocking or filtering of any kind, except that it may not resolve certain domains in extraordinary cases if we believe this is necessary to protect Google's users from security threats.”


ref: cloudfare. Interesting they have family friendly DNS. Not for me but maybe useful for some.


Apologies for the confusion. I meant Australian ISP/RSPs DNS is used to deny access to certain sites.
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Is there a reason you wouldn't use a local DNS server/service (local cache) forwarded to Cloudfare as Primary upstream and a non-Cloudfare DNS server as Secondary? Most users visit the same websites over and over, a cached DNS does the job, gives you more control/privacy and enables a few layers of redundancy.

No reason at all. I have my own DNS server running on my NAS (not to solve the problem you mentioned). Also remember, your computer/phone etc will cache results so you don't really need a local one for that.
 

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