Hiking the Camino de Santiago in 2019

GoldCanyon340

Established Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2011
Posts
2,741
Qantas
Platinum 1
Day 21 supplemental - The Monastery of San Anton

The Monastery of San Anton is located in the abandoned village of San Antón. It was founded in 1146 by King Alfonso VII and known as the “Royal Xenodochium of San Antonio Abad”, a xenodochium being a hospital for foreigners or pilgrims. The current ruins belong to the 14th century.

In the 12th century the Order of the Hospital Brothers of St. Anthony was founded and it opened several hospitals along the Camino de Santiago. They treated contagious diseases, specifically the so-called “St. Anthony’s fire”, and treated pilgrims on the way towards Santiago. This monastery was one of these hospitals.

7DC92BE8-20D0-43FA-99D3-60CBD4EEE68C.jpeg

D384AD75-4670-4A34-A3E2-92492CB7601D.jpeg

8E235301-6B74-4B5B-B442-9B1F8EF258A7.jpeg

A8D282FB-645C-4AE5-9E50-E89D5180E77B.jpeg

93529824-1FB5-47CA-B12A-B8C3D1A9823C.jpeg

3233BEA1-134F-4806-9B23-3BEF40C0F1F7.jpeg

B904054A-71E9-4A6A-8E7A-7BC0A3D933B8.jpeg

87163EB1-5E88-4FB0-9B95-D8495ACD9959.jpeg

(Text edited from blog.caminofacil.net)
 

GoldCanyon340

Established Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2011
Posts
2,741
Qantas
Platinum 1
Day 22 - 30th September 2019: Castrojeriz to Frómista

Mrs 340 is feeling the effects of the yesterday’s long hike in the heat. I’m a little sunburnt, probably more wind burn really. She decides to skip this section and get a taxi to Frómista and I’m not keen for her to do that on her own so we go together. It’s not a big deal for us really. We’d like to walk every inch of the trail but as I mentioned before we have to plan a Marathon not a sprint.

We have this morning view from our hotel room after breakfast.

953249C4-E32D-4F24-9DBD-CF945962C39C.jpeg

The taxi ride is easy and we have a second breakfast once at Frómista before exploring.

1DE93B69-01CF-44F8-BE19-66E361EA4F8A.jpeg

There are two churches here: Iglesia de San Pedro and Iglesia de San Martin.

17EBDF51-DE18-4613-BF34-8BDBBF178820.jpeg

9D33CC27-B17A-4311-B568-104A4C2D4F61.jpeg

Saint Elmo, without his fire.

15534138-02A4-40BA-BD76-9D82B8EF4E7C.jpeg

I have a pilgrim lunch while Mrs 340 reads, rest in the room for a while then Mrs 340 has a pilgrim dinner while I write text for this trip report. Both these meals, of course, come with a bottle of wine (ahem).

73966AEC-B197-41EB-8F11-FC0472F03B1F.jpeg

One item we’ve enjoyed on this journey, and in other European countries, is the gathering of families and generations in families in the town square or other area. Frómista’s main gathering place is outside our accommodation and it’s a joy to see people of all ages getting together as a community. The two main countries in my life, the UK and Australia, really miss out with this I feel with sprawling suburbs and most socialising enacted behind fences in private.

Well lubricated we partake in an evening stroll and browse the town by night.

609B9E17-B772-445E-9DA3-B6A303DCA543.jpeg

9ED730DF-1BF7-4F73-915E-6C9EF6D82716.jpeg
 

GoldCanyon340

Established Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2011
Posts
2,741
Qantas
Platinum 1
Even more thoughts from the front.....

Despite my best attempts to post we’ve had more tiring days but thankfully no injuries. Had one bad day of rain but you’ll see that later on.

Currently having our last rest day before the last stretch into Santiago. I have a glass of wine so am putting together text and pictures. It takes me about an hour to edit pictures and write text for a day’s blog so sometimes it is just too difficult; today is my first official rest day in two weeks, with a few 20km days.

All is good at this end though.
 

GoldCanyon340

Established Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2011
Posts
2,741
Qantas
Platinum 1
Day 23 - 1st October 2019: Frómista to Carrión de Los Condes

20.5kms today with a gain of 60 metres in elevation between origin and destination. The Meseta produces long and flat days. The ‘official’ Camino on this section runs the entire length of the road between Frómista and Carrión but there is an ‘alternativo’ that heads on a track to the north out of the first settlement at Población de Campos and rejoins at Villalcázar de Sirga. This is more pleasant, runs along the Rio Uciéza and adds just 0.9km.

We leave Frómista with the sun peeking above the horizon. Hiking this distance makes you very tall.

C41F8534-332F-4018-9EC2-E4BC1DA9D463.jpeg

You can see the Frómista to Carrión road in this picture and we will be glad to leave it and get out to the countryside. Población de Campos is 3.4km along with one café open for desayunos (breakfast). We skip this as we’re carrying pastries and fruit to eat along The Way.

The Camino alternativo turns right (northwest) on the western border of town and we take that route heading for Villovieco in another 4.1kms.

4.1kms of straight as straight country track along the Rio Uciéza and it’s into the very quiet town that’s mostly farm sheds, warehouses and machinery. One stork family also decided to make its home here.

2A3FD3F8-3678-4E09-86CD-93B394761E83.jpeg

It isn’t the first stork nest we’ve seen but this one looked particularly good. The birds rear their family in the warmer months then head south after. Many return to the same nest the following year.

So Villovieco is quiet but does have a good café, good for a caffe con leche and caffe Americano with our pastries.

CBBF7BB6-98C0-490E-AB0D-4D27404C36F2.jpeg

Then a longer 6.5km stretch to Villalcázar de Sirgar but this section has good shade from the rising sun. Just before town is the church Ermita de la Virgen del Rio.

FCA2B34D-A850-473D-91D2-7A0E799762B2.jpeg

A stop for lunch in town girding ourselves for the 6kms to Carrión as this is back on the road. Still straight but now very windy and tiring.
Compared to the last few hours in farmland the view has changed considerably and now it’s just a path on the side of the road with no shade.

56A0B99D-40A0-46E8-83B4-18351C0639F5.jpeg

Carrión is a good sized place to stay the night.

C85A7D9F-B40F-4C3B-83CA-35B16A1A7896.jpeg

FA246462-169F-4936-B51B-AB8AC57F7E35.jpeg

We stay at the old monastery over the river away from the town centre itself.

0F1662FC-B7E0-40D5-8A88-FC68B15C59F8.jpeg

We have a few beers, catch up with friends who have lost one of their phones (!) then have dinner. A good day aside from the lost phone.
 
Sponsored Post

Struggling to use your Frequent Flyer Points?

Award Flight Assist takes the hard work out of finding award availability and redeeming your frequent flyer or credit card points for flights.

Using their expert knowledge and specialised tools, the Award Flight Assist team at Frequent Flyer Solutions will help you book a great trip that maximises the value for your points.

GoldCanyon340

Established Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2011
Posts
2,741
Qantas
Platinum 1
Day 24 - 2nd October 2019: Carrión de Los Condes to Calzadilla de la Cueza

16.3kms across flat, empty landscape. Away from roads and pretty much all civilisation until tonight’s stop at Calzadilla.

The good news to start the day is our friend recovered his phone. It was handed in at the police station.

This is the ‘secondary’ cloister at our hotel, the old monastery. It looks good in the morning light.

0436EEE1-2084-4C6C-8ED5-A65D93A7F475.jpeg

As today is a long slog we get breakfast at the hotel and hit the road. This is the view we essentially see all day: a quiet back road only used by the odd local, sometimes with farm machinery.

7A47C5D5-A4B5-4182-B0AE-BF90E21C5510.jpeg

This section is so quiet there’s nothing until the 9.1km mark at Café Móvil. A landmark on The Way and mentioned in guidebooks this is operated by a local. She has sausages cooking over a camp fire and sells basic coffee and snacks too. The smell of the wood burning is excellent.

59142BB0-DDB7-4060-BC85-029581258B82.jpeg

Then more of the same road for 7.2kms to our destination. This is classic Meseta and pilgrims either love it or they don’t. I’m in the former camp as I take the bush and wilderness over the beach any day of the week.

Arriving into Calzadilla there are random murals with the church as the background.

D5F57B0D-B338-4AF9-A19C-8FDCE7ED8AE0.jpeg

We had quite a few beers and wines at the bar with what is to me a perfect view. Just open land and views stretching for a long way. The picture can’t quite encapsulate the landscape but it gives an idea.

899B4F75-B267-4E0C-B6B4-1AEB5745194A.jpeg

A filling pilgrim dinner tonight at our albergue and then early to bed: it’s more of the same tomorrow.
 

GoldCanyon340

Established Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2011
Posts
2,741
Qantas
Platinum 1
Day 25 - 3rd October 2019: Calzadilla de la Cueza to Sahagún

20.7kms today again through flat landscape but with a few villages to break the trip.

One of those early 7am alarms. We have breakfast at the accommodation as it’s cheap and acquire pastries for the hike.

The sun highlights the hills nicely this morning.

5B17AA3A-9DD4-4A36-B3FE-05B206DCF0BA.jpeg

A helpful arrow points the way in case bearings are lost.

BE6E8460-70E7-41EC-8FDF-5016E1C96FC5.jpeg

6.1kms along is our first town, Ledigos. It is quiet at this time of the morning.

E458DE38-59B1-42EF-89BE-3096632A48EA.jpeg

A few local dogs hang around the western exit from town and walk with us for a while. They’re friendly and obviously enjoy seeing new faces every day. We have a stretch along the local main road until Terradillos de los Templarios, which has a large church in relation to the obviously small population.

C62E61AE-2F9E-4521-91AF-5738D518ABB8.jpeg

Moving away from the main road we once more are surrounded by farmland. I really enjoy this. It is peaceful and many people contemplate the Meaning Of Life, the Universe and Everything on this section of The Camino. Not finding the number 42 anywhere I decide instead to get a picture to encapsulate this countryside.

6753F68A-661B-4FDA-9E9B-E52334747010.jpeg

Though Moratinos (3.2km) and into San Nicolás del Real Camino (2.8kms). Quiet again but there is an albergue/café open catering for pilgrims. Many of these villages do not see any real movement before 1pm for the locals.

A08C472E-7876-43B4-BE0A-108F3CAECA72.jpeg

Then an interesting section. The sun is getting warm and legs are tiring. The 4kms along the road is mentally tiring to add to the complaints from our legs. Just as Sahagún is in touching distance the trail diverts right (north) over the road. 300 metres later we realise why as we turn left again and approach the Ermitage del Virgen. This small church marks the half distance of The Way from St Jean Pied de Port.

0209E750-43DE-494B-B8DC-718AAD905436.jpeg

543983E5-6415-47B3-82FB-DF85BD80A8D0.jpeg

We take 20 minutes here, a long break, to rest legs and eat pastry. A break like this works wonders and refreshes the limbs superbly. We need it as the western approach to Sahagún is not impressive. However once over the bridge, past the railway station and into the Old Town Sahagún opens up into really a nice place.

We have a couple of post hike drinks, shower and rest before a quiet dinner at the accommodation. It’s been a physically tiring day but we have a rest day here tomorrow and can explore.
 

Melburnian1

Enthusiast
Joined
Jun 7, 2013
Posts
22,612
The photos are atmospheric and terrific.

You said early on that walking in Dec/Jan would still be enjoyable, but it'd be less busy. Wouldn't the weather at that time of year be challenging at times for walkers?
 
Joined
Jun 3, 2014
Posts
567
Qantas
Bronze
Virgin
Red
It could occasionally be a little challenging at that time of the year...
This isn’t my photo, but was taken during January (admittedly at one of the higher altitude spots).
If you’ve got your heart set on walking in their winter, be sure to plan for lots of rain, mud, snow, etc. Many people love it then, because there are few other walkers around, but it can also mean that the accommodation & eating options are also fewer. It also seems that the risk of sunburn is much reduced...

1579921400059.gif
 

GoldCanyon340

Established Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2011
Posts
2,741
Qantas
Platinum 1
For anyone still subscribed.....

Hello! I got lagged in posting updates from Spain and then went through Morocco and Ireland before heading back to Australia. And then Covid hit and then, well, you know. I'm still going to post the pics and narrative for the rest of the Camino Frances though. Stay prepared as we are hiking the Portuguese Camino from Porto to Santiago de Compostela in May 2023.

I hope you've enjoyed everything.... we had such a good time and I do support anyone and everyone doing this walk.
 

Enhance your AFF viewing experience!

From just $6 we'll remove all advertisements so that you can enjoy a cleaner and uninterupted viewing experience.

And you'll be supporting us so that we can continue to provide this valuable resource :)


Sample AFF with no advertisements? More..
Top