General Medical issues thread

wandering_fred

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Have had a long term discussion with several GPs on cholesterol levels. Now take 2g fish oil/day in addition to what is in the following discussion. There was a period of 3-4 years where only a higher level of fish oil was taken as the original lipitor/atorvastatin script at 10mg encouraged leg muscle pain.
Put on ezetrol without great success until an observant GP noticed it is supposed to have 10mg atorvastatin as well. That lasted 6 months (albeit with stellar cholesterol levels) and after much friendly discussion I started cutting the 10mg tablets in half. Most of the muscle aggravation went away and while the cholesterol levels increased - it was to a still acceptable level. Which is where I am at the moment.
Muscles still get seriously aggravated at times, but there is a good correlation between "abusive" activity and the pain levels.
Maybe this will help someone with their medical wandering
Fred
 

Pushka

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Have had a long term discussion with several GPs on cholesterol levels. Now take 2g fish oil/day in addition to what is in the following discussion. There was a period of 3-4 years where only a higher level of fish oil was taken as the original lipitor/atorvastatin script at 10mg encouraged leg muscle pain.
Put on ezetrol without great success until an observant GP noticed it is supposed to have 10mg atorvastatin as well. That lasted 6 months (albeit with stellar cholesterol levels) and after much friendly discussion I started cutting the 10mg tablets in half. Most of the muscle aggravation went away and while the cholesterol levels increased - it was to a still acceptable level. Which is where I am at the moment.
Muscles still get seriously aggravated at times, but there is a good correlation between "abusive" activity and the pain levels.
Maybe this will help someone with their medical wandering
Fred
Why does cholesterol medication impact so much on muscular areas?
 

wandering_fred

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Why does cholesterol medication impact so much on muscular areas?

statins deplete coenzyme Q10 which is important in muscle operation and repair.
As well self generation is reduced as a person ages.

There exists a discussion (argument?) as to whether CoQ10 supplements are effective.
Anecdotal response (both I and cardiac affected spouse): YES
Note: the heart is a LARGE muscle

Search engines will supply a path for further wandering
Fred
 

TheRealTMA

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Have had a long term discussion with several GPs on cholesterol levels. Now take 2g fish oil/day in addition to what is in the following discussion. There was a period of 3-4 years where only a higher level of fish oil was taken as the original lipitor/atorvastatin script at 10mg encouraged leg muscle pain.
Put on ezetrol without great success until an observant GP noticed it is supposed to have 10mg atorvastatin as well. That lasted 6 months (albeit with stellar cholesterol levels) and after much friendly discussion I started cutting the 10mg tablets in half. Most of the muscle aggravation went away and while the cholesterol levels increased - it was to a still acceptable level. Which is where I am at the moment.
Muscles still get seriously aggravated at times, but there is a good correlation between "abusive" activity and the pain levels.
Maybe this will help someone with their medical wandering
Fred
My old GP suggested that one of the things that can sometimes help the leg muscle pain and wandering leg syndrome is Magnesium (chelated) along with vitamin D to help absorption. Seems to have a positive effect. YMMV.
 

tgh

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I have a steady association with debilitating nocturnal leg cramps.
Prescription Quinate.. absolute magic bullet..but health downsides with everyday use… leads to….
Magnesium solution.. life saver at 1am.. nails it in a flash
Magnesium tablets ..big help but no magic unless combined with
Stretching.. absolute key to survival.. every night drunk or sober.. down on the floor and stretch ..hard…
 

cove

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I have two medications that cost the same whether it is a 10 or a 20 so the specialist prescribes the bigger tablet and I cut it in half with a pill cutter.
Just received my blood test results and almost no red numbers so I was pleased. I got the lab to email me the results and they came in just over 24 hours.
 
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Seat0B

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statins deplete coenzyme Q10 which is important in muscle operation and repair.
As well self generation is reduced as a person ages.

There exists a discussion (argument?) as to whether CoQ10 supplements are effective.
Anecdotal response (both I and cardiac affected spouse): YES
Note: the heart is a LARGE muscle

Search engines will supply a path for further wandering
Fred
thanks for this info - I recently started on rosuvastatin after not being able to get (hereditary) high cholesterol under control by other means and have had muscle pains - mainly upper arms and quads. I googled it, and tried the "stop it for a week, then resume every second day for 2 weeks, then back to full dose" advice which does seem to have helped a fair bit, but I might try a CoQ10 supplement. It can't hurt anything other than my hip pocket nerve to try that.
 
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Did you get an answer to your question RK? Normally I would think it would be OK but as you are immunocompromised I think one of the medicos would have a better idea.
 

RooFlyer

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Not sure if this belongs in a covid thread, but I guess it can be moved if so. Thought I would share the covid-type precautions when I was admitted to hospital via Emergency Dept on Friday (all OK, false alarm; I went to Emergency out of an abundance of caution and because I have excellent health insurance!).

I had or felt an 'issue' in downtown Hobart after a strenuous gym session, so I showered then walked 100m into the Emergency Dept of Hobart Private Hospital. Mask on at entrance, quickly triaged by nurse at reception, usual covid questions. Vax status asked but evidence not asked for. I filled out a bit of paperwork and paid the fee, as I clearly wasn't 'critical' for my minor symptoms.

Admitted to the emergency ward; curtains closed and again triaged by masked nurse poking her head through the curtains at an appropriate distance. Given a RAT, throat and nose swab with nurse in full PPE. Hooked up to machines by nurse in full PPE. Nothing except observations until result came through (doctor may have poked her head through curtains, can't remember); I was comfortable and knew myself by this time that it most likely wasn't the medical issue feared, but happy to see it through.

RAT negative, then consult by doctor in mask only. Bloods taken. Chest x-rays; enternal wait; one blood result higher than it should be. Wait 2 hours for second blood to be taken. Wait for more hours until result came through - a little bit more elevated. My specialist consulted by phone by the staff and wants me admitted. Damn; I wasn't expecting that by this time.

PCR test given; results took some hours to come through - negative, then taken up to the critical care ward. Masks on in all 'public' areas on the ward, but I could take my mask off in my room - that was a bonus and surprise and I wasn't asked to mask up when people came into my room. All workers on the ward in masks; no visitors allowed (to the hospital full stop except for palliative etc). My specialist came in Saturday morning, closely examined all results, me and my circumstances. OK to be discharged. Nothing to see here.

And that was about it; all the covid stuff seemed approriate and sensible from my point of view, except for not being asked for evidence of vax status on ED admission. No evidence of any stretched resources; some of my waits were long, but I don't think thats unusual.

And the whole process? It was a bit of a nuisance for me; happy to suffer it rather than bear the worry of whatever it might have been flaring up to something serious later. Strangely, I never was given any inpatient admittance paperwork.
 
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VPS

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Not sure if this belongs in a covid thread, but I guess it can be moved if so. Thought I would share the covid-type precautions when I was admitted to hospital via Emergency Dept on Friday (all OK, false alarm; I went to Emergency out of an abundance of caution and because I have excellent health insurance!).

I had or felt an 'issue' in downtown Hobart after a strenuous gym session, so I showered then walked 100m into the Emergency Dept of Hobart Private Hospital. Mask on at entrance, quickly triaged by nurse at reception, usual covid questions. Vax status asked but evidence not asked for. I filled out a bit of paperwork and paid the fee, as I clearly wasn't 'critical' for my minor symptoms.

Admitted to the emergency ward; curtains closed and again triaged by masked nurse poking her head through the curtains at an appropriate distance. Given a RAT, throat and nose swab with nurse in full PPE. Hooked up to machines by nurse in full PPE. Nothing except observations until result came through (doctor may have poked her head through curtains, can't remember); I was comfortable and knew myself by this time that it most likely wasn't the medical issue feared, but happy to see it through.

RAT negative, then consult by doctor in mask only. Bloods taken. Chest x-rays; enternal wait; one blood result higher than it should be. Wait 2 hours for second blood to be taken. Wait for more hours until result came through - a little bit more elevated. Specialist consulted and wants me admitted. Damn; I wasn't expecting that by this time.

PCR test given; results took some hours to come through - negative, then taken up to the critical care ward. Masks on in all 'public' areas on the ward, but I could take my mask off in my room - that was a bonus and surprise and I wasn't asked to mask up when people came into my room. All workers on the ward in masks; no visitors allowed (to the hospital full stop except for palliative etc). Specialist came in Saturday morning, closely examined all results, me and my circumstances. OK to be discharged. Nothing to see here.

And that was about it; all the covid stuff seemed approriate and sensible from my point of view, except for not being asked for evidence of vax status on ED admission. No evidence of any stretched resources; some of my waits were long, but I don't think thats unusual.

And the whole process? It was a bit of a nuisance for me; happy to suffer it rather than bear the worry of whatever it might have been flaring up to something serious later. Strangely, I never was given any inpatient admittance paperwork.
always better to be safe than sorry - good thing it worked out OK
 

Anna

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Asking for a friend (yes really) - does it seem at all likely to be covid if there is the faintest of sore throats, a hardly-at-all dripping nose and the main symptom is spasms in the gut? Triple vaxxed person.

Night 1 - 2 episodes of spontaneous dry retching without vomiting (no alcohol had been consumed), night 2 - woken twice by pain from spasm in the bowel (pain only, no diarrhoea). Dr Google doesn't rule out digestive covid symptoms but doesn't seem to think they are very common?
 

andye

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Asking for a friend (yes really) - does it seem at all likely to be covid if there is the faintest of sore throats, a hardly-at-all dripping nose and the main symptom is spasms in the gut? Triple vaxxed person.

Night 1 - 2 episodes of spontaneous dry retching without vomiting (no alcohol had been consumed), night 2 - woken twice by pain from spasm in the bowel (pain only, no diarrhoea). Dr Google doesn't rule out digestive covid symptoms but doesn't seem to think they are very common?
Gut symptoms were quite common with Delta, less so with omicron in my experience
 

wandering_fred

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Given there is (officially at least) no Covid circulating in regional WA, quercetin vitD vitC zinc and panadol quickly eliminated my "cold" quite quickly. Where was this knowledge years ago when it would have been more useful....

Especially when wandering
Fred
 
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Not sure if this belongs in a covid thread, but I guess it can be moved if so. Thought I would share the covid-type precautions when I was admitted to hospital via Emergency Dept on Friday (all OK, false alarm; I went to Emergency out of an abundance of caution and because I have excellent health insurance!).

I had or felt an 'issue' in downtown Hobart after a strenuous gym session, so I showered then walked 100m into the Emergency Dept of Hobart Private Hospital. Mask on at entrance, quickly triaged by nurse at reception, usual covid questions. Vax status asked but evidence not asked for. I filled out a bit of paperwork and paid the fee, as I clearly wasn't 'critical' for my minor symptoms.

Admitted to the emergency ward; curtains closed and again triaged by masked nurse poking her head through the curtains at an appropriate distance. Given a RAT, throat and nose swab with nurse in full PPE. Hooked up to machines by nurse in full PPE. Nothing except observations until result came through (doctor may have poked her head through curtains, can't remember); I was comfortable and knew myself by this time that it most likely wasn't the medical issue feared, but happy to see it through.

RAT negative, then consult by doctor in mask only. Bloods taken. Chest x-rays; enternal wait; one blood result higher than it should be. Wait 2 hours for second blood to be taken. Wait for more hours until result came through - a little bit more elevated. My specialist consulted by phone by the staff and wants me admitted. Damn; I wasn't expecting that by this time.

PCR test given; results took some hours to come through - negative, then taken up to the critical care ward. Masks on in all 'public' areas on the ward, but I could take my mask off in my room - that was a bonus and surprise and I wasn't asked to mask up when people came into my room. All workers on the ward in masks; no visitors allowed (to the hospital full stop except for palliative etc). My specialist came in Saturday morning, closely examined all results, me and my circumstances. OK to be discharged. Nothing to see here.

And that was about it; all the covid stuff seemed approriate and sensible from my point of view, except for not being asked for evidence of vax status on ED admission. No evidence of any stretched resources; some of my waits were long, but I don't think thats unusual.

And the whole process? It was a bit of a nuisance for me; happy to suffer it rather than bear the worry of whatever it might have been flaring up to something serious later. Strangely, I never was given any inpatient admittance paperwork.
Glad to hear you were given the all clear - and better to be safe than sorry as they say, and of course the lingering worry if you hadn't had it checked out.
Post automatically merged:

No, I didn't, so went ahead anyway, as I may be not so mobile later (I'm thinking another operation soon).
This for the mets in the lung? Or sprung up elsewhere?
 
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